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By WILEY A. HALL | January 6, 1994
Convicted murderer Dontay Carter apparently targeted middle class white men when he embarked on his violent crime spree in Baltimore two years ago. Carter was convicted last year of the kidnapping and murder of Vitalis V. Pilius and of the kidnapping, attempted murder and robbery of two other men. All were white.Carter and his compatriots used their victims' credit cards and identification to treat themselves to jewelry and sports shoes and to rent rooms in fancy downtown hotels; yet at his sentencing hearing last summer Carter -- who is black -- described himself as a victim striking back against white oppression.
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NEWS
October 3, 2012
Polling surveys all seem to ask black or white questions that leave little or no room for grays. Take the gambling survey used your recent article "Poll finds support for same-sex marriage, but not gambling" (Sept. 29). I think the question on gambling should have been a bit broader. For example, instead of simply asking "would you vote for expanded gambling Maryland," the survey might have asked "would you vote for allowing table games in Maryland casinos?" Or simply "does Maryland need another casino?"
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | December 24, 1992
Santa Claus: Kindly old gent or outdated patriarchal figure?In this era of multiculturalism, it is inevitable that Santa Claus would come under question: He's just so darn . . . white. And male. And consigns his wife to cookie-baking tasks."Santa Claus is a symbol. Symbols are very important in how we direct our lives," said Katherine Canada, a Goucher College associate professor of developmental psychology. "And the symbol of power, happiness and generosity during this time of year is a white man."
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | July 3, 2008
Democratic Sen. Barack Obama is the first nonwhite candidate in U.S. history to win a major-party presidential nomination. That fact alone makes him a tradition-breaking, political pioneer. Much less discussed is that Mr. Obama is an atypical, nontraditional African-American politician, too. I'm not talking about Mr. Obama's rhetorical abilities or personal charisma, which set him apart from the vast majority of American politicians of all races. I refer instead to five aspects of Mr. Obama's biography that make him unique even among America's black political class.
NEWS
June 13, 1999
Whole black or white peppercorns keep indefinitely in a cool, dark, dry place; ground pepper loses quality after three months.-- Cole's Cooking From A to Z
FEATURES
By The Los Angeles Times | November 7, 1991
HOLLYWOOD - Jermaine Jackson says that he took a biting musical swipe at his superstar sibling, Michael, because his younger brother had frozen him out of his life.In an interview, Jermaine explained that the cantankerous lyrics to his song "Word to the Badd!!," which criticize Michael for allegedly changing his skin color and obtaining plastic surgery, were written in retaliation for eight months of unreturned phone calls."I understand he's a very busy person, but after you repeatedly try to contact your own brother and he doesn't call you back, you begin to wonder if he hasn't just completely lost touch with reality," Jermaine, 37, told the Los Angeles Times.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 14, 1995
What may be the most expensive and elaborate promotional campaign in the history of popular music slipped into high gear last night as MTV offered the exclusive premiere of Michael Jackson's new video, "Scream."With a production budget of some $7 million, it's a hugely expensive promo clip, costing three-and-a half times as much as TLC's elaborate, effects-laden "Waterfalls" video -- and that's not counting duet partner Janet Jackson's share of the royalties.But that's just a drop in the bucket compared with the $30 million Jackson's label plans to spend on promotion for his new album, "HIStory."
FEATURES
By Richard W. Stevenson and Richard W. Stevenson,New York Times | November 13, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- It has been four years since his last album, "Bad," and nearly nine years since the release of "Thriller," the best-selling recording in history. And as Michael Jackson bursts back into the nation's musical consciousness this month with a new album amid a wave of carefully crafted hype, he must prove that he remains at the cutting edge of song and dance while defending his position as the world's pre-eminent pop star."This is the most important record in Michael Jackson's career," said Benny Medina, the director of artists and repertory at Warner Brothers Records, a label competing with Jackson's record company, Sony.
NEWS
June 24, 1997
THREE DECADES AGO, Jim Rouse's dream was to build a town without barriers. Black or white, rich or poor -- it didn't matter. People could live in the same communities. This was just the opposite of what was happening in many metropolitan areas across the country.In the 1960s, as Columbia was rising from farmland, white families were leaving neighborhoods in Baltimore and other cities that rapidly were becoming integrated. At the same time, white and black families were moving to integrated neighborhoods in Columbia.
NEWS
By JOHN SULLIVAN | September 15, 1992
This month I begin my third year teaching GED -- high school equivalency -- classes in the City That Reads. I have taught geometry, chemistry, grammar, decimals and dozens of other subjects. I believe my students have learned something from me. I know I have learned from them.I have learned that the biggest hurdle facing my students is not race, it's class.I teach in Pigtown in southwest Baltimore. About half my students are black and half are white -- some are themselves half black and half white.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | July 25, 2007
A thoughtful exhibition at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland - Visions of Conflict: Rendering Dissent - shrewdly questions America's use of military power to resolve international disputes, but some artists more than others take full advantage of the fertile topic's charged relevance. The show's centerpiece is a huge, oil-on-canvas triptych by painter Leslie Smith III that mockingly rebukes President Bush, his father, former President George H.W. Bush, former Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and former Secretary of State Colin L. Powell for their roles in embroiling America in the Iraq debacle.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 17, 2006
This is for a reader who demands to know why I write about gay issues. His conclusion is that I must secretly be gay. Actually, he doesn't express himself quite that civilly. To the contrary, his e-mails - which, until recently, were arriving at the rate of about one a week - evince a juvenility that would embarrass a reasonably intelligent fifth-grader. The most recent one, for example, carried a salutation reading, "Hi Mrs. Pitts." We're talking about the kind of thing for which delete buttons were invented.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Speciall to the Sun | August 27, 2006
There Goes My Everything: White Southerners in the Age of Civil Rights, 1945-1975 By Jason Sokol Alfred A. Knopf / 416 pages / $27.95 The civil rights movement of the 1950s and '60s confronted embedded beliefs and behavior, and transformed the social, political and legal landscape in the American South. Virtually no one, black or white, remained untouched by it. In There Goes My Everything, Jason Sokol, a doctoral student at the University of California at Berkeley, examines the response of ordinary white Southerners to the "new realities" - in public schools, municipal pools, motels, restaurants and voting booths.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2000
At Martin Boulevard Elementary School, small is beautiful: The eastern Baltimore County elementary does everything to teach reading in small groups or one on one. The school devotes so much attention to thinking small that its reading specialist's classroom has been split in two -- one side for the teacher to work with small groups of kids, the other side for a half-dozen cubicles for individual tutoring. Many elementaries would love to do this. Some use popular but expensive programs in which one teacher tutors just a few kids a day. But Martin Boulevard does it by hiring a handful of parents as tutors.
NEWS
June 13, 1999
Whole black or white peppercorns keep indefinitely in a cool, dark, dry place; ground pepper loses quality after three months.-- Cole's Cooking From A to Z
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 28, 1998
Fuzzy Zoeller and Al Campanis must be outraged. A black sports figure, Reggie White, has joined them and the late Jimmy the Greek in the Insensitivity Hall of Fame.White is a good man who was well-intentioned even in his worst moment. But his remarks to the Wisconsin Legislature were inexcusable, and he deserves the same criticism as those who stumbled before him.Gay bashing, racial stereotyping, it doesn't matter whether the offender is black or white, a minister or a layman.It's wrong.Yet White, an ordained fundamentalist Christian minister, refuses disavow his comments.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Speciall to the Sun | August 27, 2006
There Goes My Everything: White Southerners in the Age of Civil Rights, 1945-1975 By Jason Sokol Alfred A. Knopf / 416 pages / $27.95 The civil rights movement of the 1950s and '60s confronted embedded beliefs and behavior, and transformed the social, political and legal landscape in the American South. Virtually no one, black or white, remained untouched by it. In There Goes My Everything, Jason Sokol, a doctoral student at the University of California at Berkeley, examines the response of ordinary white Southerners to the "new realities" - in public schools, municipal pools, motels, restaurants and voting booths.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 28, 1998
Fuzzy Zoeller and Al Campanis must be outraged. A black sports figure, Reggie White, has joined them and the late Jimmy the Greek in the Insensitivity Hall of Fame.White is a good man who was well-intentioned even in his worst moment. But his remarks to the Wisconsin Legislature were inexcusable, and he deserves the same criticism as those who stumbled before him.Gay bashing, racial stereotyping, it doesn't matter whether the offender is black or white, a minister or a layman.It's wrong.Yet White, an ordained fundamentalist Christian minister, refuses disavow his comments.
NEWS
June 24, 1997
THREE DECADES AGO, Jim Rouse's dream was to build a town without barriers. Black or white, rich or poor -- it didn't matter. People could live in the same communities. This was just the opposite of what was happening in many metropolitan areas across the country.In the 1960s, as Columbia was rising from farmland, white families were leaving neighborhoods in Baltimore and other cities that rapidly were becoming integrated. At the same time, white and black families were moving to integrated neighborhoods in Columbia.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 13, 1995
On Sundays such as this, The Baltimore Times arrives. There are 32,000 copies printed each week, which are distributed through scores of the area's black churches, and through supermarkets and street boxes, and in this politically charged season its arrival tends to make the mayor of this city, Kurt L. Schmoke, duck for cover.Consider these words, from a recent front-page editorial written by the Rev. Peter Bramble, 49-year-old pastor at West Baltimore's St. Katherine's Episcopal Church who owns the Times and makes it a kind of political extension of his pulpit:"For the first time in his political life, Schmoke is wrapping himself in blackness -- African-American flag colors and symbols.
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