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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 1996
DENVER -- After a 3-year-old boy was killed in a drive-by shooting in December, 100 black men fanned out through a black neighborhood here. They knocked on doors until leads resulted in three arrests several days later.After rival gangs firebombed four houses in the same northeast Denver neighborhood in January, more than 1,000 men turned out for a five-hour protest rally, the All Black Men Conference. The firebombings stopped.It has been nearly six months since the Million Man March, the gathering of hundreds of thousands of black men in Washington in October organized by the Nation of Islam and its leader, Louis Farrakhan.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop , tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 15, 2009
A federal judge raised doubts Monday about the city's ability to prove huge financial losses from houses left vacant by Wells Fargo foreclosures, the latest development in a landmark civil suit alleging a pattern of racially based, discriminatory lending by the mortgage broker. U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz said he might pare the case, if not outright dismiss it. "Should we go down that road? ... It's going to cost a lot of people a lot of money, including the taxpayers," said Motz, who took over the case in August after the previous judge discovered a conflict of interest.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1995
Getting a pizza delivered around Annapolis can be an ordeal.Some city residents say food delivery companies discriminate against blacks by refusing to take orders from minority neighborhoods with high crime rates. Drivers say their reluctance has nothing to do with race. They simply don't want to enter areas where their co-workers have been mugged, robbed or shot -- just to make a $10 delivery, they say.The city council tried to solve the problem this week, but instead underscored the issue's complexity.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | January 12, 2008
Baltimore's lawsuit against Wells Fargo for its subprime mortgages has stirred up frustration among industry players, who say they're increasingly taking heat for offering loans in poorer and minority neighborhoods despite being urged for years to do just that. "What are you supposed to do?" asked Thomas Shaner, executive director of the Maryland Association of Mortgage Brokers, repeating the sentiment he heard this week. The city's suit, filed Tuesday, alleges that Wells Fargo targeted black neighborhoods for the higher-cost, looser-standards home loans and is responsible for the resulting high foreclosure rates.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
The city has filed a petition asking the Maryland Court of Appeals to reinstate an injunction requiring removal of 1,300 illegal billboards that advertise mainly alcohol and cigarettes in black neighborhoods.In filing yesterday, the city is seeking to expedite the legal fight over the billboards and move it to the state's highest court. The billboards' owner had appealed the case to the Court of Special Appeals, the intermediate appellate court."There has been considerable concern, and unrest in some instances, by many of our residents because of the presence of illegal billboards," Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1994
Using a closed-down East Baltimore night club as backdrop, members of The City Wide Liquor Coalition yesterday urged city residents to challenge the liquor licenses of package stores and taverns linked to drug dealing, loitering, noise and other community problems.Challenges to the licenses held by the city's 1,650 bars, restaurants and liquor stores can be filed with the Baltimore City Board of Liquor Commissioners throughout March. Hearings will be scheduled next month for any business hit with challenges from at least 10 people.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1996
The NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union have accused PHH Corp. of discriminatory mortgage lendingpractices in Philadelphia, a charge that the Hunt Valley-based company denies.In a complaint filed Thursday with the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission, the two groups say PHH U.S. Mortgage Corp. of Mount Laurel, N.J. -- PHH's mortgage lending division -- unfairly denied loans to African-Americans and rejected loans for properties in Philadelphia's black neighborhoods.PHH contends that it has programs and safeguards that prevent bias in lending.
NEWS
February 13, 1995
What the American Civil Liberties Union hopes to achieve through its public housing suit is clear. It hopes to duplicate Hills vs. Gautreaux and force the predominantly white counties surrounding majority black Baltimore to house some of the city's poor and subsidized families.Whether the ACLU suit will manage to repeat what happened in Chicago is quite another matter. Yes, Hills vs. Gautreaux began spreading subsidized families throughout the Chicago metropolitan area, but only because of a long legal tug-of-war that ended favorably for the plaintiffs.
NEWS
January 10, 2008
A spike in foreclosures can be seen across Baltimore: families moving out and houses ending up vacant and shuttered. The personal losses are devastating enough, but an investigation by the city suggests a disturbing trend - Baltimore's foreclosures are most prevalent in black neighborhoods, and it's not coincidental. The disproportionate rate, the city contends, is the result of an insidious and illegal practice, reverse redlining. The claims are at the center of an innovative lawsuit filed this week by Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration against Wells Fargo Bank, one of the top two mortgage lenders in Baltimore in the past three years.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Ivan Penn and Gerard Shields and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1999
Democratic mayoral candidate Martin O'Malley, whose strong showing in Tuesday's primary surprised even his most ardent supporters, gained one in three black votes and nine of every 10 white votes.According to a Sun analysis of voting results, O'Malley ran 28 percentage points higher in such black neighborhoods as Walbrook Junction than former City Council President Mary Pat Clarke, who is white, did in 1995 against Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. O'Malley also posted 25 percentage points more than Clarke did in liberal white neighborhoods such as Hamilton, which gave Schmoke one in three votes four years ago.O'Malley picked up 53 percent of the vote citywide -- despite running against two veteran African-American politicians and 14 other candidates.
NEWS
January 10, 2008
A spike in foreclosures can be seen across Baltimore: families moving out and houses ending up vacant and shuttered. The personal losses are devastating enough, but an investigation by the city suggests a disturbing trend - Baltimore's foreclosures are most prevalent in black neighborhoods, and it's not coincidental. The disproportionate rate, the city contends, is the result of an insidious and illegal practice, reverse redlining. The claims are at the center of an innovative lawsuit filed this week by Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration against Wells Fargo Bank, one of the top two mortgage lenders in Baltimore in the past three years.
NEWS
July 11, 2007
The symbolic burial of the N-word at this week's annual convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People was an important attempt to put to rest a word that has long been used to insult and disrespect those who are black. As welcome as this funeral was, however, the NAACP and others in the black community should be even more focused on the kind of disrespect that results in mindless violence and too many black-on-black killings. As an incendiary symbol of hatred and racism, probably no word is as loaded as the N-word.
NEWS
By Thomas E. Noel and Charles M. Christian | December 24, 2006
Young black men in our communities are falling into a deep hole - a hole filled with crime, unemployment and despair. They are falling so far, and so fast, that extricating many of them might well be impossible. And yet, for their sakes and ours, we must try. Our personal lives and our many years spent as a Circuit Court judge and college professor, respectively, have caused us to question the destiny of the black community - particularly that of the black male. In December 2004 we independently published articles in a book titled The State of Black Baltimore.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | August 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- After making what he admits were "demagogic" remarks about Jewish, Asian and Arab business owners, Andrew Young has done the right thing. The former civil rights leader, Atlanta mayor and U.N. ambassador found himself guilty and sentenced himself to resign as head of a Wal-Mart advocacy group. Mr. Young, 74, stuck his wingtips in his mouth during an interview published in Thursday's Los Angeles Sentinel, the West Coast's oldest and largest black-owned weekly. He was asked whether Wal-Mart squeezed small stores out of black neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2004
WHEN IRIS Smith moved into the Glen section of Northwest Baltimore, one of her neighbors was Jose Brito. That was 29 years ago. Today, Smith, an African-American medical social worker who grew up in Atlantic City, and Brito, a Jewish engineer who came to Baltimore from Brazil, are still in their houses a few blocks north of Pimlico Race Course. Smith, who heads the Glen Neighborhood Improvement Association, likes being able to take the subway to her job downtown and return to her shaded street.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | January 19, 2004
ATLANTA - The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. might be pleasantly surprised by many of the changes in the nation's social fabric since his death. The civil rights movement accomplished an astonishing transformation. But Dr. King would no doubt be quite disappointed in one area of black life that has only deteriorated since his assassination: the percentage of black men in prison. In 1954, black inmates accounted for 30 percent of the nation's prison population, according to the Sentencing Project, a Washington-based group that advocates alternative sentencing.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Patrick Gilbert and Michael A. Fletcher and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | September 13, 1991
Baltimore's black voters delivered huge majorities to Mayor ,, Kurt L. Schmoke, paving the way to his easy victory in the Democratic primary.Schmoke won 80 percent or more of the votes in mostly black neighborhoods such as Northwood, Ashburton, Arlington and Forest Park in yesterday's election, according to an analysis by the city's election board.Schmoke also did well in the city's upper-income white communities, including Mount Washington and Roland Park. Schmoke got close to 65 percent of the vote in both of those neighborhoods.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | August 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- After making what he admits were "demagogic" remarks about Jewish, Asian and Arab business owners, Andrew Young has done the right thing. The former civil rights leader, Atlanta mayor and U.N. ambassador found himself guilty and sentenced himself to resign as head of a Wal-Mart advocacy group. Mr. Young, 74, stuck his wingtips in his mouth during an interview published in Thursday's Los Angeles Sentinel, the West Coast's oldest and largest black-owned weekly. He was asked whether Wal-Mart squeezed small stores out of black neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2003
When city officials had to find new homes for residents displaced by a shuttered public housing complex, they initially considered converting a vacant school in Canton in Southeast Baltimore. But they finally decided on Johnston Square on the east side, buying and rehabilitating 10 abandoned rowhouses. How and why the city decided in the early 1990s to put public housing in an almost all-black neighborhood and not a mostly white one has become one of the focal points in the trial in federal court here on discrimination claims brought by public housing residents against the city and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
NEWS
By Anders Hoerlyck | July 3, 2003
IN THEORY, the American housing market is free and open. Theory would then predict that market forces would control supply and demand and thereby distribute houses in a fair manner depending on the economic choices of the household. But this is still not the case for black homebuyers in metropolitan areas. For a variety of reasons - including continued, if not so open, racism and discrimination - black homebuyers pay more than their white counterparts, get stuck with higher-interest loans and get less home value for the money spent.
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