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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 1998
JASPER, Texas -- Despite fears of violence, a showdown between white supremacists and black militants remained relatively peaceful here yesterday on Jasper's courthouse square, leaving residents feeling relieved.Name-calling and threats were as bad as it got on a sweltering day in this East Texas town where a 49-year-old black man, James Byrd Jr., was dragged to death behind a pickup truck three weeks ago."It's wrong for either of them to be here," Joyce Edmond, a black woman, said of the two groups.
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NEWS
By Geraldine Baum and Geraldine Baum,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 28, 2007
VILLIERS-LE-BEL, France -- They burned the library overnight during a riot in this gritty suburb outside of Paris. The blackened shelves and books were thrown around like garbage the next morning, and singed desks were piled on top of each other like old firewood. As they examined the wreckage yesterday - the senator, the sports coach and the teenagers with sticks and pipes still skulking around in the light of day - all had similar explanations as to why. Why the arson up and down the commercial streets?
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | December 3, 1992
CBS News will broadcast a special report tonight called "Malcolm X: The Real Story." Calling this show "the real story" might be the most outrageous TV claim of the year.The show itself is a superficial archival-clips-and-quickie-interview job with Dan Rather as host. As such, it probably wouldn't be worth too much attention.But the fact that it will be seen by about 20 million people tonight and that CBS is telling those viewers that they are seeing "the real story" opens the door for a look at how TV has dealt with Malcolm X over the years.
NEWS
By Teresa Watanabe and Teresa Watanabe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Islam's two pre-eminent African-American leaders, separated by two decades of rivalry before reconciling two years ago, reaffirmed unity Friday in their first joint appearance in Los Angeles. Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and W.D. Muhammad of the Muslim American Society offered stark contrasts - one a fiery orator of political polemics and black empowerment, the other a low-key leader who resolutely sticks to religion. Once united under Nation founder Elijah Muhammad, they split 25 years ago over doctrine, with W.D. Muhammad rejecting his father's blend of Islam and black nationalism and moving into orthodox Sunni Islam.
NEWS
By KEN HAMBLIN | June 25, 1992
Denver -- Recently, a soul brother -- or maybe it was a soul sister -- determined that I needed to be reeled back into the racial fold and so he or she decided to help by sending me a free subscription to the Final Call, the official newspaper of the Nation of Islam and the Black Muslims.Whoever you are, thank you. I have been reading the publication from cover to cover every month. A short clip in the June 15 edition got my attention this week. The story said, ''Neither international law, moral outrage, complaints from lawmakers, nor threatened lawsuits have stopped President Bush from ordering Haitian refugees back home.
NEWS
May 15, 2000
C. Eric Lincoln, 75, a longtime Duke University professor who was among the leading scholars of black religious life, died yesterday in Durham, N.C. The cause of death was not determined yesterday. A professor emeritus at Duke, he was an author or editor of 22 books. His most well-known books were "The Black Muslims in America," written in 1961, and "The Black Church in the African-American Experience," written in 1990 with a former student. "The Black Church" book, considered the definitive work on the subject, revealed the strength of the black church in the United States but also raised troubling issues, including the failure of the black church to pay attention to young black males and the lack of young blacks entering the ministry.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | October 22, 1995
PARIS -- The black men's march on Washington last Monday was an astonishing initiative and, in its own terms, a great success. It was fully in the tradition of black activism in the United States. The ambivalence it provoked in America's black as well as white establishments -- which wanted to approve the march while disapproving of its sponsor -- was proof of its authenticity.The establishments advocate integration. The ideology of the march was separatist, the doctrine of Louis Farrakhan, its initiator.
NEWS
By HUGH PEARSON | November 27, 1991
Oakland, California -- Last month former members of the Black Panther Party met to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the party's founding. Though posters were placed throughout black neighborhoods in Oakland, Berkeley and Richmond, only about 50 people attended.The next day, on the grounds of what used to be the Oakland Community School, built and run by the Black Panthers, 3,000 people turned out for the worship services of Acts Full Gospel Church. Acts was started in 1984 by an Oakland evangelist, Bob Jackson.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1994
NEW YORK -- The crowd that packed a Brooklyn church to rally behind embattled NAACP Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. looked a lot like his vision for the venerable civil rights organization.In the crowd of 800 Tuesday night were elders and youth, black nationalists and integrationists, Baptists and black Muslims -- united by their support of the more militant course Dr. Chavis has set for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.To Dr. Chavis and his supporters, the special meeting of the NAACP board set for Saturday is as much about the new direction of the civil rights group as it is about Dr. Chavis' decision to pay $332,400 to a fired aide who accused him of sexual discrimination and sexual harassment.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | November 25, 1992
Washington -- James Farmer, a famous civil-rights leader in the '60s, took on the unenviable task of debating Malcolm X on television several times during the years when Malcolm still made it his mission to put a scare into white folks.Fortunately for Mr. Farmer, he was a much better debater than the hapless character Spike Lee pits against Malcolm in one rather amusing scene in his hit movie, ''Malcolm X.''Mr. Lee's Malcolm thrashes his black bourgeois opponent by comparing him to ''house slaves'' who were so loyal to their plantation masters that they would stay on the plantation even when freedom was offered to them by rebellious ''field slaves.
NEWS
May 15, 2000
C. Eric Lincoln, 75, a longtime Duke University professor who was among the leading scholars of black religious life, died yesterday in Durham, N.C. The cause of death was not determined yesterday. A professor emeritus at Duke, he was an author or editor of 22 books. His most well-known books were "The Black Muslims in America," written in 1961, and "The Black Church in the African-American Experience," written in 1990 with a former student. "The Black Church" book, considered the definitive work on the subject, revealed the strength of the black church in the United States but also raised troubling issues, including the failure of the black church to pay attention to young black males and the lack of young blacks entering the ministry.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 1998
JASPER, Texas -- Despite fears of violence, a showdown between white supremacists and black militants remained relatively peaceful here yesterday on Jasper's courthouse square, leaving residents feeling relieved.Name-calling and threats were as bad as it got on a sweltering day in this East Texas town where a 49-year-old black man, James Byrd Jr., was dragged to death behind a pickup truck three weeks ago."It's wrong for either of them to be here," Joyce Edmond, a black woman, said of the two groups.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1998
Recalling FBI harassment, harrowing missionary trips and the spellbinding teaching of Elijah Muhammad, five "pioneers" yesterday recounted their role in the founding more than 50 years ago of the Black Muslim movement in Baltimore.The pioneers, now in their 70s, held forth for nearly three hours before several dozen rapt members who sat listening on the dark green carpet of the Walter Omar Muslim Cultural Center in West Baltimore, a mosque of the American Muslim Society."In the beginning, I was known as Wali 2X," said Wali Abdul Hamid Aquil, 78, who converted to Islam in 1948, two years after the temple was founded in Baltimore.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | October 22, 1995
PARIS -- The black men's march on Washington last Monday was an astonishing initiative and, in its own terms, a great success. It was fully in the tradition of black activism in the United States. The ambivalence it provoked in America's black as well as white establishments -- which wanted to approve the march while disapproving of its sponsor -- was proof of its authenticity.The establishments advocate integration. The ideology of the march was separatist, the doctrine of Louis Farrakhan, its initiator.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1994
NEW YORK -- The crowd that packed a Brooklyn church to rally behind embattled NAACP Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. looked a lot like his vision for the venerable civil rights organization.In the crowd of 800 Tuesday night were elders and youth, black nationalists and integrationists, Baptists and black Muslims -- united by their support of the more militant course Dr. Chavis has set for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.To Dr. Chavis and his supporters, the special meeting of the NAACP board set for Saturday is as much about the new direction of the civil rights group as it is about Dr. Chavis' decision to pay $332,400 to a fired aide who accused him of sexual discrimination and sexual harassment.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | December 3, 1992
CBS News will broadcast a special report tonight called "Malcolm X: The Real Story." Calling this show "the real story" might be the most outrageous TV claim of the year.The show itself is a superficial archival-clips-and-quickie-interview job with Dan Rather as host. As such, it probably wouldn't be worth too much attention.But the fact that it will be seen by about 20 million people tonight and that CBS is telling those viewers that they are seeing "the real story" opens the door for a look at how TV has dealt with Malcolm X over the years.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer Staff writers Anne Haddad, Robert Hilson Jr., Sherry Joe, Mary Maushard and Sherrie Ruhl contributed to this article | November 18, 1992
Not long ago, Evelyn Chatmon, 50-something, started reading, "The Autobiography of Malcolm X." She was mesmerized."I grew up thinking he was a negative man, until Spike Lee piqued my interest," said Mrs. Chatmon, an assistant superintendent for Baltimore County schools."
NEWS
July 8, 1992
Insurance FraudI was appalled that the article relating to the indictment of 11 individuals by a federal grand jury for insurance fraud was buried on page 5 of Section E, June 26. In my opinion, this should have been front-page news.The public should be made aware on a constant basis of auto insurance fraud. This could help doctors, lawyers, insurance personnel and the public to be more aware of the problem.If all honest and law-abiding citizens help to attack insurance fraud, hopefully we will not have to pay higher insurance premiums to compensate for this ongoing fraud.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | November 25, 1992
Washington -- James Farmer, a famous civil-rights leader in the '60s, took on the unenviable task of debating Malcolm X on television several times during the years when Malcolm still made it his mission to put a scare into white folks.Fortunately for Mr. Farmer, he was a much better debater than the hapless character Spike Lee pits against Malcolm in one rather amusing scene in his hit movie, ''Malcolm X.''Mr. Lee's Malcolm thrashes his black bourgeois opponent by comparing him to ''house slaves'' who were so loyal to their plantation masters that they would stay on the plantation even when freedom was offered to them by rebellious ''field slaves.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer Staff writers Anne Haddad, Robert Hilson Jr., Sherry Joe, Mary Maushard and Sherrie Ruhl contributed to this article | November 18, 1992
Not long ago, Evelyn Chatmon, 50-something, started reading, "The Autobiography of Malcolm X." She was mesmerized."I grew up thinking he was a negative man, until Spike Lee piqued my interest," said Mrs. Chatmon, an assistant superintendent for Baltimore County schools."
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