Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlack Music
IN THE NEWS

Black Music

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
Paul W. "Scottie" Scott, a retired Maryland Transit Administration bus driver who was an ardent collector of Motown music and artifacts that earned him the sobriquet of "Mr. Motown," died Friday of bladder cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 78. Born to working-class parents in Baltimore, Paul Wesley Scott was raised in East Baltimore, where he graduated in 1953 from Dunbar High School. He joined the Navy in the mid-1950s, serving as a steward. "During his brief leaves, he loved to party to the sounds of Etta James, Ray Charles, Clyde McPhatter, Sam Cooke, the Coasters, Tina Turner, Otis Redding, Elvis, Chuck Berry, Billie Holiday, the Temptations, and the list goes on and on," said Sherrell Claiborne, a granddaughter, who lives in Owings Mills.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
Paul W. "Scottie" Scott, a retired Maryland Transit Administration bus driver who was an ardent collector of Motown music and artifacts that earned him the sobriquet of "Mr. Motown," died Friday of bladder cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 78. Born to working-class parents in Baltimore, Paul Wesley Scott was raised in East Baltimore, where he graduated in 1953 from Dunbar High School. He joined the Navy in the mid-1950s, serving as a steward. "During his brief leaves, he loved to party to the sounds of Etta James, Ray Charles, Clyde McPhatter, Sam Cooke, the Coasters, Tina Turner, Otis Redding, Elvis, Chuck Berry, Billie Holiday, the Temptations, and the list goes on and on," said Sherrell Claiborne, a granddaughter, who lives in Owings Mills.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1991
THE MORGAN State University choir was specifically written into a 45-minute musical history of 350 years of African-Americans by the collaboration of the composer, Hannibal Peterson, and Nathan Carter, choir director, two friends now preparing for tomorrow's Baltimore premiere of "African Portraits.""Hannibal composed the work with Morgan's choir in mind after we had sung with the American Composers Orchestra at Carnegie Hall a couple of times," Carter said. The talks between friends and others led to the first performance at Carnegie Nov. 11, a kind of trial run for tomorrow at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
Couples - mostly middle-class, middle-aged and almost entirely black - gather at Washington's Lincoln Theatre for a night of adventurous soul music, the kind seldom heard on today's commercial urban radio. Of the night's acts, Baltimore's Fertile Ground is the most musically daring. The septet crafts a sound that slips in and out of jazz, R&B, Brazilian samba and African roots music. James Collins, a lanky man with unruly dreads who founded the band with lead singer Navasha Daya, addresses the crowd from his keyboards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Hoffman and Larry Hoffman,Special to The Sun | June 24, 1994
For almost four decades Taj Mahal has parlayed a mastery of African-American music into an internationally celebrated career.An arsenal that includes banjo, bass, dulcimer, guitar, piano, kalimba, mandolin, vibes, fife and cello has enabled him to portray such styles as blues, ragtime, reggae and R&B much as an abstract painter might approach a still life.Although the musician balks at the term "eclectic," his presentation of the panorama of black music has made him a unique presence on the concert stage -- years before it was made fashionable by such pop stars as Paul Simon.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 11, 2004
If you bring sincerity and integrity to your work," Darin Atwater says, "people will feel it." The 34-year-old composer, conductor, pianist and arranger proves that point every time he expresses himself through music. This is especially true when the vehicle for that expression is the Soulful Symphony, the orchestra of African-American musicians he founded in 2000. On Saturday, the ensemble will give a concert at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, launching the first full season there as part of a new partnership with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | June 10, 2004
JUNE IS Black Music Month. President Bush finally got around to "proclaiming" it last year. But let me tell ya: I don't need 30 days designated as a time to recognize the wealth of contributions brothas and sistas have made to American music: the blues, rock, jazz, gospel, R&B, hip-hop. Please! Every day is Black Music Month. Just click on the radio or turn the channel to MTV: Black performers every hour on the hour -- gyrating across the screen, tossing silky weaves, rapping about -- well, nothing really.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | October 25, 1992
Move over Michael Jackson. Garth Brooks, the heartthrob of country music, is replacing the King of Pop at Annapolis' only black radio station.In another sign of the growing popularity of country music, WANN is dropping its mix of gospel, rhythm and blues, and public affairs programming for a mainstream country format Nov. 2.The AM station is adopting a new slogan, "Bay Country 1190," to attract more listeners with the chart-climbing country songs that have...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
Couples - mostly middle-class, middle-aged and almost entirely black - gather at Washington's Lincoln Theatre for a night of adventurous soul music, the kind seldom heard on today's commercial urban radio. Of the night's acts, Baltimore's Fertile Ground is the most musically daring. The septet crafts a sound that slips in and out of jazz, R&B, Brazilian samba and African roots music. James Collins, a lanky man with unruly dreads who founded the band with lead singer Navasha Daya, addresses the crowd from his keyboards.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2000
Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones, the African-American dramatic soprano who had performed in Baltimore, was such a commanding presence on the stage that she was often compared to Adelina Patti, one of the greatest coloratura Italian opera singers of the 19th century. Jones, who sang for presidents and kings and was denied a role at the Metropolitan Opera in New York because she was black, was known throughout her career as "the Black Patti," a name she somewhat despised. Born in Portsmouth, Va., in 1869, the daughter of a former slave and Baptist minister, Jones moved in 1876 with her family to Providence, R.I. She began singing as a child at the Pond Street Baptist Church there and studied at the Providence Academy of Music and the New England Conservatory of Music.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 11, 2004
If you bring sincerity and integrity to your work," Darin Atwater says, "people will feel it." The 34-year-old composer, conductor, pianist and arranger proves that point every time he expresses himself through music. This is especially true when the vehicle for that expression is the Soulful Symphony, the orchestra of African-American musicians he founded in 2000. On Saturday, the ensemble will give a concert at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, launching the first full season there as part of a new partnership with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | June 10, 2004
JUNE IS Black Music Month. President Bush finally got around to "proclaiming" it last year. But let me tell ya: I don't need 30 days designated as a time to recognize the wealth of contributions brothas and sistas have made to American music: the blues, rock, jazz, gospel, R&B, hip-hop. Please! Every day is Black Music Month. Just click on the radio or turn the channel to MTV: Black performers every hour on the hour -- gyrating across the screen, tossing silky weaves, rapping about -- well, nothing really.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 22, 2004
This year marks the 10th anniversary of the end of apartheid in South Africa. When this is mentioned to Albert Mazibuko, a member of the South African vocal group Ladysmith Black Mambazo, he immediately lets out a long, satisfied, "Yeaaahhh." "It's good to see it in this way," he said from Las Vegas, one stop on a tour that will bring the group to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis Wednesday. "Because I've seen it before how it was, and I can see it now. It's wonderful.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2000
Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones, the African-American dramatic soprano who had performed in Baltimore, was such a commanding presence on the stage that she was often compared to Adelina Patti, one of the greatest coloratura Italian opera singers of the 19th century. Jones, who sang for presidents and kings and was denied a role at the Metropolitan Opera in New York because she was black, was known throughout her career as "the Black Patti," a name she somewhat despised. Born in Portsmouth, Va., in 1869, the daughter of a former slave and Baptist minister, Jones moved in 1876 with her family to Providence, R.I. She began singing as a child at the Pond Street Baptist Church there and studied at the Providence Academy of Music and the New England Conservatory of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Hoffman and Larry Hoffman,Special to The Sun | June 24, 1994
For almost four decades Taj Mahal has parlayed a mastery of African-American music into an internationally celebrated career.An arsenal that includes banjo, bass, dulcimer, guitar, piano, kalimba, mandolin, vibes, fife and cello has enabled him to portray such styles as blues, ragtime, reggae and R&B much as an abstract painter might approach a still life.Although the musician balks at the term "eclectic," his presentation of the panorama of black music has made him a unique presence on the concert stage -- years before it was made fashionable by such pop stars as Paul Simon.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | October 25, 1992
Move over Michael Jackson. Garth Brooks, the heartthrob of country music, is replacing the King of Pop at Annapolis' only black radio station.In another sign of the growing popularity of country music, WANN is dropping its mix of gospel, rhythm and blues, and public affairs programming for a mainstream country format Nov. 2.The AM station is adopting a new slogan, "Bay Country 1190," to attract more listeners with the chart-climbing country songs that have...
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | July 12, 1991
WITH COMMANDING EXUBERANCE, William Sydnor leads the Chancel Choir of the Shiloh Christian Community Church through "Roll, Jordan, Roll," said to be the first published African-American spiritual in 1862.As choir members rehearse in their church, located in a stark, West Baltimore row house neighborhood, Sydnor envisions another choir: The Fisk Jubilee Singers. On a historic 1871 fund-raising tour, the group of nine black Fisk University students -- eight of them former slaves -- delivered their spirituals to white America and rescued their Nashville-based university from bankruptcy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 22, 2004
This year marks the 10th anniversary of the end of apartheid in South Africa. When this is mentioned to Albert Mazibuko, a member of the South African vocal group Ladysmith Black Mambazo, he immediately lets out a long, satisfied, "Yeaaahhh." "It's good to see it in this way," he said from Las Vegas, one stop on a tour that will bring the group to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis Wednesday. "Because I've seen it before how it was, and I can see it now. It's wonderful.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | July 12, 1991
WITH COMMANDING EXUBERANCE, William Sydnor leads the Chancel Choir of the Shiloh Christian Community Church through "Roll, Jordan, Roll," said to be the first published African-American spiritual in 1862.As choir members rehearse in their church, located in a stark, West Baltimore row house neighborhood, Sydnor envisions another choir: The Fisk Jubilee Singers. On a historic 1871 fund-raising tour, the group of nine black Fisk University students -- eight of them former slaves -- delivered their spirituals to white America and rescued their Nashville-based university from bankruptcy.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1991
THE MORGAN State University choir was specifically written into a 45-minute musical history of 350 years of African-Americans by the collaboration of the composer, Hannibal Peterson, and Nathan Carter, choir director, two friends now preparing for tomorrow's Baltimore premiere of "African Portraits.""Hannibal composed the work with Morgan's choir in mind after we had sung with the American Composers Orchestra at Carnegie Hall a couple of times," Carter said. The talks between friends and others led to the first performance at Carnegie Nov. 11, a kind of trial run for tomorrow at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.