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NEWS
October 18, 1996
THE SUBURBAN EXODUS, which caused Baltimore's population to decline from about 950,000 to below 700,0000 in the past five decades, continues.According to new U.S. Census Bureau estimates, the city lost 37,000 white residents from 1990 to 1994. Joining them were 14,000 blacks, who moved to the counties in search of better schools, lower taxes and a better quality of life.These statistics are likely to be debated. They are, after all, only estimates. But the federal demographers' projections dovetail with visual impressions that many city neighborhoods -- including once-stable black middle-class areas -- are emptying out. This trend is evidenced by a multitude of "For Sale" signs and the migration of such neighborhood anchors as houses of worship and retail businesses to the counties.
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NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | January 16, 2010
The poet Langston Hughes called Harlem the "Negro Capital of the World," and in the 1950s, when I was growing up there, it really was. The great northern migration of Southern blacks that began near the turn of the last century had made Harlem the largest African-American community in the country, and people still looked back with pride to the remarkable flowering of black arts and culture of the 1920s known as the Harlem Renaissance. So I was somewhat nonplused by a recent report that African-Americans no longer constitute a majority in Harlem.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | January 11, 2008
Seeking to erase the stark economic disparities between black and white Baltimore residents, a group of civic leaders unveiled a plan yesterday to expand the city's black middle class, saying doing so is vital to the city's economic health. Called "More in the Middle," the project, spearheaded by Associated Black Charities, is the culmination of 2 1/2 years of research among business and nonprofit leaders. Through public and private partnerships, the program aims to take on the large task of closing the black-white wealth gap, while trying to reverse decades of black flight and help low-income residents climb to the ranks of the middle class.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | January 21, 2008
Come April, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. will have been dead 40 years from the bullet of a racist assassin. In August, it will have been 45 years since he delivered his "I have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Dr. King gave his life to improve the condition of black Americans. If he were with us today, he would be witness to a march backward. He would see young, black high school dropouts standing on the street corners of Baltimore and other once-great cities, pants worn low, using foul language and killing each other by the thousands.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | February 21, 2005
A FEW WEEKS AGO, we celebrated the birth and life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and it was quite fitting and proper that we did so. This month, as we celebrate black history, we should remember that his dream was of an America that would be a place of peace, brotherhood, opportunity and justice for all of its people. The dream that he spoke of was the same dream that a long list of black heroes who went before him had dreamed. Their dreams were born of the nightmare of racial oppression, snarling police dogs, beatings, jailings and lynchings.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | January 21, 2008
Come April, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. will have been dead 40 years from the bullet of a racist assassin. In August, it will have been 45 years since he delivered his "I have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Dr. King gave his life to improve the condition of black Americans. If he were with us today, he would be witness to a march backward. He would see young, black high school dropouts standing on the street corners of Baltimore and other once-great cities, pants worn low, using foul language and killing each other by the thousands.
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | March 9, 2007
Bruce S. Gordon was, as always, tactful and circumspect in explaining why he was bowing out as NAACP president after only 19 months at the helm. He would only say that there were differences between himself and others in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; presumably, that meant his differences were with some on the organization's 64-member national board. His low-key pronouncement was in keeping with the no-nonsense, corporate approach to civil rights advocacy that he brought to the organization.
NEWS
December 31, 2007
Despite some progress, the economic mobility of black Americans is still not comparable to that of whites, according to three recent studies by a scholar at the Brookings Institution. Most disappointing is the financial stagnation that has hit black middle-class families, which raises serious questions about the idea that middle-class status guarantees an even better life for children and future generations. The stagnant, even falling, financial prospects for many blacks is a disturbing trend that will require a number of short- and long-term solutions.
NEWS
By John Rivera | January 20, 1992
Baltimoreans black and white gathered together in an East Baltimore church yesterday and recalled the dream of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., pledging to work for racial justice and peace in their city.The worshipers were members of 14 Presbyterian congregations that form a coalition they call "Harambee," Swahili for "pulling together."They gathered at the Knox Presbyterian Church, a group almost equally black and white, to sing, to pray and to commit themselves to "the Biblical vision for justice, peace and true hope for all people through Jesus Christ."
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | July 22, 1999
IN HIS keynote address to the NAACP's annual conference this month, NAACP President Kweisi Mfume blasted the gun industry, the TV networks and police agencies. Mr. Mfume's tough talk made me wonder whether the nation's oldest civil rights group would again become the big player in the battle against racism and injustice that it has been for most of its long history.I wondered about this because the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has spent most of the 1990s in a monumental retreat from cutting-edge social activism.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | January 11, 2008
Seeking to erase the stark economic disparities between black and white Baltimore residents, a group of civic leaders unveiled a plan yesterday to expand the city's black middle class, saying doing so is vital to the city's economic health. Called "More in the Middle," the project, spearheaded by Associated Black Charities, is the culmination of 2 1/2 years of research among business and nonprofit leaders. Through public and private partnerships, the program aims to take on the large task of closing the black-white wealth gap, while trying to reverse decades of black flight and help low-income residents climb to the ranks of the middle class.
NEWS
December 31, 2007
Despite some progress, the economic mobility of black Americans is still not comparable to that of whites, according to three recent studies by a scholar at the Brookings Institution. Most disappointing is the financial stagnation that has hit black middle-class families, which raises serious questions about the idea that middle-class status guarantees an even better life for children and future generations. The stagnant, even falling, financial prospects for many blacks is a disturbing trend that will require a number of short- and long-term solutions.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | December 3, 2007
ATLANTA -- A recent poll has found that 61 percent of black Americans believe that the values of poor blacks have become "more different" from the values of middle-class blacks in recent years. With the possible exception of Bill O'Reilly - who professed astonishment at the good manners of black patrons at a Harlem restaurant - no one should be surprised at those findings. There have long been two Americas - both black. One is inhabited by the accomplished, the educated, the pragmatic.
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | March 9, 2007
Bruce S. Gordon was, as always, tactful and circumspect in explaining why he was bowing out as NAACP president after only 19 months at the helm. He would only say that there were differences between himself and others in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; presumably, that meant his differences were with some on the organization's 64-member national board. His low-key pronouncement was in keeping with the no-nonsense, corporate approach to civil rights advocacy that he brought to the organization.
NEWS
By Clarence Page and Clarence Page,Chicago Tribune | August 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Amid the flood of one-year-after analyses of Hurricane Katrina's impact on the Gulf Coast, it is important to remember what Sen. Barack Obama, Democrat of Illinois, said on the Senate floor shortly after the storm: "I hope we realize that the people of New Orleans weren't just abandoned during the hurricane. They were abandoned long ago to murder and mayhem in the streets, to substandard schools, to dilapidated housing, to inadequate health care, to a pervasive sense of hopelessness."
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | February 21, 2005
A FEW WEEKS AGO, we celebrated the birth and life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and it was quite fitting and proper that we did so. This month, as we celebrate black history, we should remember that his dream was of an America that would be a place of peace, brotherhood, opportunity and justice for all of its people. The dream that he spoke of was the same dream that a long list of black heroes who went before him had dreamed. Their dreams were born of the nightmare of racial oppression, snarling police dogs, beatings, jailings and lynchings.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | May 9, 1992
Dear Mr. President: Now that you have completed your whizz-bang, early morning visit to the gutted streets of L.A., stooping to pray in a black church but slipping out before ''The Battle Hymn of the Republic'' warmed up, it appears that there are still points you need to hear.So it is good that you have asked people to be ''blunt'' in telling you what went wrong in L.A. Blunt answers about the desperation of the inner cities are the only ones worth hearing these days. Before this, you insulated yourself from such news.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Marion S. Barry Jr. may talk a lot about his spiritual rebirth and the "God force" within him, but his triumph in the Democratic mayoral primary was a miracle of old-fashioned political organizing that captured the resentment of black voters.Mr. Barry's sophisticated voter registration and get-out-the-vote efforts paid off in record vote totals in many poor neighborhoods, where he is regarded as a symbol of proud defiance against the city's black and white establishment. His message of personal redemption, coupled with his command of the details of the District's government and politics, enabled him to carry six of this city's eight election wards.
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