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By GREGORY KANE | January 24, 2007
Lordy, Lordy, Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley wasn't that bad a mayor of Baltimore, was he? You'd think so if you read attorney Warren Brown's now controversial letter to black Baltimore mayoral candidates last week. Brown sent the letter to current Mayor Sheila Dixon and several other black candidates who have announced they will run against her in this year's election. "Surely you must recognize," the never-bashful defense attorney wrote, "that with five Blacks pursuing this office, a member of the (white)
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 27, 2011
John Thomas Chambers Jr., Annapolis' first black mayor, died Friday morning of a heart attack. His death came five days before his 83rd birthday. "He loved helping others," said Hannah Scott Chambers, his wife of 57 years. "He loved all sports, and he loved church, children and people. He was an unusual individual. I kept expecting him to change. Thank God he never did. " The second oldest of four children, Mr. Chambers was born and raised in the Parole community of Annapolis. His father, the Rev. John T. Chambers Sr., owned the popular Chambers Barber Shop, and was one of the founders of the Anne Arundel County branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | April 8, 1993
Creation of jobs and a work force skilled enough to perform them are among the most critical challenges facing cities, a panel of black mayors said here yesterday.Cities must also encourage small- business development by providing investment capital and tax incentives and cutting governmental red tape, the mayors said."We often hear as elected officials that we do not care about small businesses. We hear we only care about major xTC businesses," said Cincinnati Mayor Dwight Tillery. "[But]
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
Annapolis' first black mayor, John Thomas Chambers Jr., died Friday morning of a heart attack, according to statement from the City of Annapolis Chambers, who would have turned 83 on Tuesday, was appointed mayor by city council colleagues in 1981 after Republican Mayor John C. Apostol resigned and Apostol's successor committed suicide. Chambers served from April 12 to June 7, 1981, before Richard Hillman was elected to succeed him, according to a statement on the city's website.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1998
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke gained more support yesterday in his campaign to head off a federal housing probe in Baltimore as the National Conference of Black Mayors called for an investigation of the investigator.Meeting in New Orleans, the group adopted a resolution that said Susan Gaffney, the inspector general of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, "has not offered a sound rationale for the selection of Baltimore, San Francisco and New Orleans for special investigation, nor for the instigation of such an investigation of any American city."
NEWS
By Moses J. Newson | May 1, 1998
WITH the recent announcement that housing programs in Baltimore and two other cities headed by black Democratic mayors will be the subject of federal investigations, it's clear that Republicans want to degrade black elected officials and pursue their long time goal to abolish the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.Susan Gaffney, HUD's inspector general, intentionally or not, plays directly into those Republican plans with her planned $9 million, multi-year probes of Baltimore, New Orleans and San Francisco at the insistence of the Republican-controlled Congress.
NEWS
April 9, 1996
A PERSON LOOKING at predominantly black Cleveland now might wrongly discount the significance of the election of Carl B. Stokes as its first African-American mayor. But that Ohio city today isn't the same one that Mr. Stokes was elected to lead in 1967. Then, just as it was in most of America's big cities, the overwhelming majority of Cleveland's citizens were white.To become the nation's first black mayor of a major city, Mr. Stokes ran a race-neutral campaign that spotlighted his ability to run a big city.
NEWS
By Nicholas Lemann | November 5, 1993
WITH startling rapidity, four of America's five biggest cities have replaced black mayors with whites: first, Chicago, four years ago, then Philadelphia, then Los Angeles and this week New York. It's irresistibly tempting to see a big trend here and indeed, pronouncements of the end of an era are filling the air.The era that has supposedly ended is that of "old" black politics -- stressing civil rights, welfare and other traditional liberal policies. Now, the argument goes, the cities have deteriorated to the point where voters want pragmatic, effective government and are willing to vote for whoever can provide it -- "new" (meaning centrist)
NEWS
May 2, 1992
"As to delay, sufficient manpower is a prerequisite for controlling potentially dangerous crowds; the speed with which it arrives may well determine whether the situation can be controlled. In the summer of 1967, we believe that delay in mobilizing help permitted several incidents to develop into dangerous disorders, in the end requiring far more personnel and creating increased hazards to life and property." -- Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, 1968.The public safety establishments in Los Angeles, Sacramento and Washington had every reason to be prepared for trouble in Los Angeles if the police officers charged with beating Rodney King were acquitted.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is joining the call for a congressional probe into charges that a drug ring with ties to the CIA introduced crack cocaine to the nation's cities -- and is urging other mayors to do the same.In letters sent yesterday, Schmoke urged his fellow urban leaders to join the Congressional Black Caucus in asking for an investigation into the charges raised last month in a three-part series in the San Jose Mercury News."You know of the devastating impact that drugs have had on cities in the past two decades," Schmoke wrote.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 2, 2009
A ll the cynics were wrong this time: A jury of her peers - nine women and three men, the majority of them black - found the city's first African-American female mayor guilty of a crime. We didn't have the jury nullification many had predicted - that is, acquittal in the face of strong, conclusive evidence, something that many lawyers, cops and judges have seen for years in the old courthouses on Calvert Street. Juries in Baltimore have a rap for being suspicious of police and prosecutors and sympathetic to defendants, most of whom are black.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 7, 2009
YORK, Pa. -- Motorists honked and shouted congratulations to Kim Bracey as she crossed tree-lined South George Street one crisp morning this week. Bracey made history Tuesday when voters elected her the first black mayor of York, a city with an ugly racial past. Forty years ago, a black woman and a white police officer were killed as riots convulsed the city, but it took decades for anyone to be brought to justice. Now here was Bracey, officially mayor-elect, waving to well-wishers.
NEWS
October 14, 2009
We are frankly puzzled by the alarm the Maryland NAACP raised recently over the prospect of the governor appointing a white or Republican leader to succeed Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon if she is convicted on perjury and theft charges. It's a concern unsupported by either state law or recent history. The Maryland constitution's treatment of mayoral succession in Baltimore may be difficult to follow in its details, but its effect is clear: The governor has no authority to appoint a successor to a mayor who resigns or is forced from office, and state law already provides for the orderly succession of the city council president to mayor.
NEWS
July 11, 2008
Race Street runs through the center of Cambridge, and for much of the town's history, it was a physical as well as a symbolic divide: Whites lived on one side, blacks kept to the other. That is why the election this week of Victoria Jackson-Stanley, a 54-year-old social worker, as Cambridge's first black mayor marks a historic turning point for the town that's just a few miles from Harriet Tubman's birthplace. In 1967, Cambridge's biggest employer was a canning factory and segregation was a fact of life despite Congress' passage of landmark civil rights legislation earlier in the decade.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 24, 2007
Lordy, Lordy, Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley wasn't that bad a mayor of Baltimore, was he? You'd think so if you read attorney Warren Brown's now controversial letter to black Baltimore mayoral candidates last week. Brown sent the letter to current Mayor Sheila Dixon and several other black candidates who have announced they will run against her in this year's election. "Surely you must recognize," the never-bashful defense attorney wrote, "that with five Blacks pursuing this office, a member of the (white)
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | January 22, 2006
God bless Chocolate City and its vanilla suburbs. - Parliament WASHINGTON -- Apparently, the mayor is a funkateer. That's what you call fans of Parliament, the '70s-era funk band famed for hits such as "Give Up The Funk (Tear The Roof Off The Sucker)," "Flash Light" and "Aqua Boogie (A Psychoalphadiscobetabioaquadoloop)." Parliament also recorded "Chocolate City," leader George Clinton's whimsical take on growing black political clout as reflected in the election of black mayors in such towns as Newark, N.J., Gary, Ind., Los Angeles and Washington.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1998
The chief investigator for the Department of Housing and Urban Development this week gained important political support and the promise of another $9 million for housing fraud probes in Baltimore and other cities.A House appropriations subcommittee approved the funds Thursday evening as Rep. Louis Stokes of Cleveland, the panel's senior Democrat, publicly endorsed the probes. A 30-year veteran of the House, Stokes was the first African-American on ++ the full Appropriations Committee.His comments were important because they marked his first public endorsement of the investigations since a controversy erupted over Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's charge that racism and politics were involved in the probes.
NEWS
By Rasheim T. Freeman and Rasheim T. Freeman,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
For many years, African-Americans have migrated South to live. Now a report shows that African-Americans are making the region a top destination for business travel and vacations as well. According to the Travel Industry Association of America, a not-for-profit group based in Washington, D.C., that tracks travel, Atlanta is the top travel destination for African-Americans, followed by Orlando, Fla., Washington, Dallas and New York City. The five destinations are part of a new list of the top-10 cities preferred by traveling African-Americans.
NEWS
By Rasheim T. Freeman and Rasheim T. Freeman,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
For many years, African-Americans have migrated South to live. Now a report shows that African-Americans are making the region a top destination for business travel and vacations as well. According to the Travel Industry Association of America, a not-for-profit group based in Washington, D.C., that tracks travel, Atlanta is the top travel destination for African-Americans, followed by Orlando, Fla., Washington, Dallas and New York City. The five destinations are part of a new list of the top-10 cities preferred by traveling African-Americans.
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