Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlack Leadership
IN THE NEWS

Black Leadership

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL 3RD | September 29, 1992
The number of blacks serving in Congress could grow as much as 50 percent after the general elections Nov. 3, creating one of the largest potential voting blocs in Congress.But that's only if blacks there have the will to act in concert -- and the information they need to do so effectively. And that is the role of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, said Quentin R. Lawson, the organization's new executive director.Mr. Lawson said the combined effects of redistricting and the public's current anti-incumbency mood mean that over a dozen new black members could join the 26 now serving in Congress.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | June 19, 2006
ATLANTA -- Before Bill Campbell came along, Atlanta's City Hall enjoyed a good reputation. It was not mentioned in the same manner as Chicago or New Orleans or Newark, N.J. Atlanta did not indulge corrupt politics. The city was synonymous with civil rights, Coca-Cola and a sophisticated black middle class; it was not associated with petty political thuggery. But that was before Bill Campbell. During a two-month trial that started in January, federal prosecutors charged Mr. Campbell, who was Atlanta's mayor from 1994 to 2002, with running City Hall as a criminal enterprise; the jury convicted him on charges of tax evasion.
Advertisement
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | June 19, 2006
ATLANTA -- Before Bill Campbell came along, Atlanta's City Hall enjoyed a good reputation. It was not mentioned in the same manner as Chicago or New Orleans or Newark, N.J. Atlanta did not indulge corrupt politics. The city was synonymous with civil rights, Coca-Cola and a sophisticated black middle class; it was not associated with petty political thuggery. But that was before Bill Campbell. During a two-month trial that started in January, federal prosecutors charged Mr. Campbell, who was Atlanta's mayor from 1994 to 2002, with running City Hall as a criminal enterprise; the jury convicted him on charges of tax evasion.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2003
Mayor Martin O'Malley Workers draped black bunting above the front door of City Hall and lowered the flag to half-staff yesterday to mark the death of Clarence H. Du Burns, the first black mayor of Baltimore. Burns, 84, died of kidney failure at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center on Sunday, about 16 years after the former City Council president ascended to the mayor's office to replace William Donald Schaefer, who was elected governor. Although Burns served as mayor for only 11 months, before being beaten in the 1987 Democratic primary by Kurt L. Schmoke, several city officials praised yesterday Burns' contributions to the city as a pioneer for African-Americans seeking higher office.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | June 10, 1994
LOUIS Farrakhan rolls into town this weekend to attend the three-day summit on black leadership sponsored by the NAACP, and there are many who question why he was invited.The reasons are several. Not the least is that Mr. Farrakhan's popularity should not be underestimated. For years he has filled the charisma void created in the American black nationalist community by the death of Malcolm X in 1965. His formidable oratorical skills helped propel him into that position.I attended the Nation of Islam's Savior's Day convention in 1975 -- more out of respect for Elijah Muhammad, who had died the previous day, than with any intention of joining the organization.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 2, 2000
MOVING TO THE top of the list of those things causing the most angst in the nation's African-American community is the possibility of a George W. Bush presidency. Put Bush in the Oval Office and it will set black folks back 100 years. That's the message black liberal Democratic leadership has drummed into African-Americans. Thus, blacks remain the only ethnic group in America whose leaders believe their destiny is determined by which white man occupies the White House. If it's a liberal white man, then all will be well within Afro-America.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- There are many who believe the rise in prominence of Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan reflects a crisis in black American leadership. That's only part of the story. It reflects a crisis in white leadership, too.Or, so no one will feel left out, let's call it the crisis in American leadership.Supporters of Mr. Farrakhan's ''Million Man March'' appeared to be attracted not so much by the minister or his fiery rhetoric as by the hope that today's black Americans can come up with an answer at the grass-roots level, the same way blacks created America's civil-rights movement.
NEWS
February 2, 1997
Rep. Bartlett exemplifies capital gridlockI am shocked but, sadly, not surprised, at Rep. Roscoe Bartlett's decision to support the "ethically challenged" activities Speaker Newt Gingrich by voting against the sanctions which were imposed upon Mr. Gingrich by the bipartisan House Ethics Committee. Mr. Bartlett was one of only 28 members of Congress to vote against the committee's recommendations.In explaining why he voted against the bipartisan report, Mr. Bartlett said that in his opinion, other members had committed more grave violations, yet were not punished as severely.
NEWS
September 10, 1993
Fair GameDo you want a group which votes itself a 45 percent pay raise at midnight; excepts its members from laws they pass, refuses to discipline flagrant law breakers; votes on issues on the basis of what is good for the "party" rather than what is good for the country?A group that takes 1,800 pages to "tax the rich" in the name of fairness; votes for a trillion dollar increase in debt and calls it a deficit reduction; passes retroactive tax increases; writes a cable rate reduction bill which raises the majority of rates and potentially complicates reception of all broadcast channels?
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | July 13, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Practically everyone now agrees: the nation's capital city is coming back.Some of the improvements are in services: Potholes are getting filled, trash picked up, dead trees replaced. The drug problem is abating and crime is sinking. Decrepit schools are getting repaired. Vendors are being paid, tax refunds issued.Then there's downtown Washington, on a dramatic upswing. A new MCI sports arena, new restaurants and shops are bringing back life, even on weekday nights. A business-financed improvement district providing sanitation services and extra security accounted for 82 tons of trash pickup and contributed to a 32 percent drop in crime in the district's first six months.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 2, 2000
MOVING TO THE top of the list of those things causing the most angst in the nation's African-American community is the possibility of a George W. Bush presidency. Put Bush in the Oval Office and it will set black folks back 100 years. That's the message black liberal Democratic leadership has drummed into African-Americans. Thus, blacks remain the only ethnic group in America whose leaders believe their destiny is determined by which white man occupies the White House. If it's a liberal white man, then all will be well within Afro-America.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | July 13, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Practically everyone now agrees: the nation's capital city is coming back.Some of the improvements are in services: Potholes are getting filled, trash picked up, dead trees replaced. The drug problem is abating and crime is sinking. Decrepit schools are getting repaired. Vendors are being paid, tax refunds issued.Then there's downtown Washington, on a dramatic upswing. A new MCI sports arena, new restaurants and shops are bringing back life, even on weekday nights. A business-financed improvement district providing sanitation services and extra security accounted for 82 tons of trash pickup and contributed to a 32 percent drop in crime in the district's first six months.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Rap music producer Bill Stephney told a gathering of black conservatives and clergy yesterday that "it probably seems rather strange that the likes of me is addressing you."The 34-year-old co-founder of the rap group Public Enemy told the Black Conservative Unity Summit that he came because he was fed up with what's happening to the black family.With video clips from newscasts, he clicked off the evidence: single mothers who stabbed, beat or poisoned their children.Those tragedies are an urgent call to return to morality, Stephney said, laying out the central theme of the Howard University gathering of about 60 black conservatives who want to infuse a new way of approaching problems among African-Americans.
NEWS
February 2, 1997
Rep. Bartlett exemplifies capital gridlockI am shocked but, sadly, not surprised, at Rep. Roscoe Bartlett's decision to support the "ethically challenged" activities Speaker Newt Gingrich by voting against the sanctions which were imposed upon Mr. Gingrich by the bipartisan House Ethics Committee. Mr. Bartlett was one of only 28 members of Congress to vote against the committee's recommendations.In explaining why he voted against the bipartisan report, Mr. Bartlett said that in his opinion, other members had committed more grave violations, yet were not punished as severely.
NEWS
December 13, 1995
THE MOST FREQUENTLY expressed fear before the Million Man March was that it would anoint Louis Farrakhan, the anti-Semitic head of the Nation of Islam, as the singular African-American leader. Two months later, there is scant evidence that has happened. And with the naming of the charismatic Kweisi Mfume to head the NAACP, there is less reason for those, who insist black people need a principal spokesman, to look to Mr. Farrakhan to fill that role.Mr. Farrakhan has been treated with more deference by former critics since succeeding in bringing tens of thousands to Washington.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Lashing out at black ministers who have shunned his leadership, Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam likened himself yesterday to Jesus, saying that he heals the sick and is persecuted by scribes and religious people."
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | June 16, 1994
My barber, Leroy Gattis, believes the national black leadership summit, held in Baltimore this week, was a tremendous success."It separated the men from the boys," Leroy said enthusiastically, waving his clippers in the air. "It showed us who has guts and who doesn't; who has the courage to be a leader and who needs to step aside.""But it was all for show," I protested. "It was all primping and posing and talking tough in front of the TV cameras. Did they come up with any exciting new solutions?
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Rap music producer Bill Stephney told a gathering of black conservatives and clergy yesterday that "it probably seems rather strange that the likes of me is addressing you."The 34-year-old co-founder of the rap group Public Enemy told the Black Conservative Unity Summit that he came because he was fed up with what's happening to the black family.With video clips from newscasts, he clicked off the evidence: single mothers who stabbed, beat or poisoned their children.Those tragedies are an urgent call to return to morality, Stephney said, laying out the central theme of the Howard University gathering of about 60 black conservatives who want to infuse a new way of approaching problems among African-Americans.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- There are many who believe the rise in prominence of Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan reflects a crisis in black American leadership. That's only part of the story. It reflects a crisis in white leadership, too.Or, so no one will feel left out, let's call it the crisis in American leadership.Supporters of Mr. Farrakhan's ''Million Man March'' appeared to be attracted not so much by the minister or his fiery rhetoric as by the hope that today's black Americans can come up with an answer at the grass-roots level, the same way blacks created America's civil-rights movement.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | August 21, 1995
RACE has been a rat in the crib from the start of the O.J. Simpson trial, nasty in its potential. Now it has bitten.Prosecutor Marcia Clark's willingness -- eagerness! -- to concede that the detective Mark Fuhrman lied when he swore he doesn't say "nigger" could only have been in service of trying to keep still worse from Fuhrman's tattle tape out of the trial.However this tangle works out, it is now simply impossible for many African-Americans not to believe either that Simpson is innocent and framed or, at a minimum, that the case against him is so compromised by a background drone of racial animus that no fair conclusion is possible.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.