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NEWS
December 6, 2010
The calls by "black community and civil rights leaders" for the disbanding of the Shomrim neighborhood patrol after the incident in which a black teenager was roughed up seem a little overwrought, especially the remark by Rev. Cortly Witherspoon that "this kind of activity has caused riots in other parts of the country" and the statement made by the former head of the NAACP that the "African-American community is very concerned about what happened....
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Arthur Turco had defended members of the Black Panther Party across the country, but it was in Baltimore that he would be arrested and jailed - on charges that he and members of the militant group had killed a suspected police informant within their ranks in 1969. After a year in Baltimore's jail and a mistrial, Turco said he was offered a deal: plead guilty to a misdemeanor and go free on time served. After discussing it with his associate, William Kunstler - the radical lawyer who defended such brazen civil disobedients as the Chicago Seven and the Attica prison inmates - they decided to take the offer and run. "'Let's just get the hell out of Baltimore,'" Turco remembers the famed lawyer saying.
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NEWS
December 9, 2010
Where were the Rev. Cortly "C.D. " Witherspoon and Marvin "Doc" Cheatham when a rabbi was assaulted by a group of black youth or when a 14 year old Jewish boy had his arm broken by a black youth? Where was the outrage? Where was the call for a meeting between blacks and Jews ( "Jewish, black leaders hold closed meeting on the community," Dec. 9)? Where were their comments published in the paper and news media? Why the double standard? What does a situation in Baltimore have to do with Crown Heights New York?
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Ian Duncan and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former Black Panther leader Marshall "Eddie" Conway walked free Tuesday after spending four decades behind bars for killing a Baltimore police officer - making his one of the highest-profile cases affected by a high court decision that has cut short prison sentences for dozens of felons in recent years. Conway, now 67, always said that he was innocent, alleging political motives in the prosecution of a 1970 shooting that killed Officer Donald Sager, 35, and injured another officer.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
Rev. Cortly "C.D. " Witherspoon all but threatens a riot over the alleged assault of a black teenager by a Jewish community patrol group ( "Black leaders call for Jewish patrol group to be disbanded after alleged assault," Dec. 3). Marvin "Doc" Cheatham demands the disbanding of the group, ready to throw the baby out with the bathwater as a result of one incident that no one is trying to cover up. It falls to Shaquille Carbon, the junior at Northwestern High School, to question why there should not be a community group made up of both Jews and African-Americans, and to lament the fact that his existence often goes unacknowledged by those he says hello to on the street.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Black community and civil rights leaders are calling for a Jewish neighborhood patrol group to be disbanded pending an investigation after one of the patrol's members was charged this week with assaulting a black teenager walking through a Northwest Baltimore neighborhood. Fearing racial unrest, Jewish and black leaders are planning to meet next week so members of their communities can discuss long-standing concerns. Both groups have lived in the neighborhood for decades, but they respectively claim the north and south quadrants of the Northern Parkway corridor.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | March 3, 1994
With all due respect, I say the NAACP ought to postpone its plans to sponsor a national black leadership summit this spring. A "summit" of today's "leaders" would be an oxymoron.Black leaders should not meet with anybody -- not even with themselves -- until they engage in some serious soul-searching; until they determine who they are and what they stand for; until they find the self-confidence and self-esteem to stand up, stake out a position, and act like leaders.And yes, I say this because of the seemingly endless controversy surrounding Minister Louis Farrakhan.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
A prestigious group of black leaders has called for NAACP Chairman William F. Gibson to resign and formed an "SOS" committee to "save" the civil rights organization.The 30-member group, which includes federal judges, present and former NAACP board members, NAACP state conference presidents and others, has called a Washington news conference today to form a blue-ribbon committee of "unquestioned integrity and character."Julian Bond, a civil rights veteran and one of the group's leaders, said the committee had formed to "reassure the general public there are distinguished and respected figures that have their eyes on this organization and its best interests at heart."
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1994
More than 30 black leaders in Howard County have formed an independent coalition to endorse political candidates who support black interests, and to use their influence against elected officials who do not.The African American Coalition For Howard County hopes to affect the outcome of many local and statewide races in Tuesday's primary election and to become a permanent, unifying fixture, organizers said."
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | May 9, 1991
Three years after a racial epithet by the manager of Turf Valley Country Club in Ellicott City sparked an uproar, 18 black leaders in Howard County called a news conference last night to say the private club had improved race relations.County Council Chairman C. Vernon Gray and black leaders representing fraternities, sororities and business organizations issued a press release at the club saying the Feb. 23, 1988, incident was "both intolerable and reprehensible.""But, it is significant that a positive working relationship and cooperative measures have resulted from it," they went on to say.But noticeably absent were representatives of the Howard County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Magic Johnson may have survived for more than 20 years with HIV and is in apparent good health, but don't let the basketball legend's success story fool you. HIV and AIDS remain scourges in the African-American community, where experts say infection rates are higher than in any other demographic group — and rising fast. On Thursday, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People kicked off a campaign to enlist local pastors and ministers in spreading the word that the HIV-AIDs crisis in their communities is more severe than many realize, and that plenty can be done to help.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
I commend Professor George La Noue for his careful and comprehensive analysis of the recent judicial decision concerning Maryland's historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) ( "Antiquated ruling on desegregation," Oct. 27). I concur in his observations and would like to add a couple of comments. When I came to Maryland almost a quarter century ago to join the University System of Maryland, I became engaged in a fascinating historical process. Wikipedia lists 106 HBCUs in the United States, including two- and four-year and various specialized institutions.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
The whole George Zimmerman fiasco is a shameful travesty of justice. Mr. Zimmerman should have never been brought to trial ("Martin verdict protests continue," July 16). The only reason he was arrested is because of the political actions of President Obama and leaders of the black community. They, along with the mainstream, made this a racial issue media when there was none. If Mr. Zimmerman had been a black man, this would have been in the local news and nobody would have been concerned - not the president, not the media nor any of the black leaders.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 14, 2013
The American clock brings us to the 50th anniversaries of two extraordinary events involving two extraordinary women, Gloria Richardson Dandridge and Madalyn Murray O'Hair — both strong-willed champions of liberty and disturbers of the status quo, but women of very different character, purpose and legacy. One is now 91 years old, long esteemed as a brave civil rights leader who refused to smile on demand and who famously brushed away a bayonet. The other was a noisy atheist, reviled as the most hated woman in America; she died a violent death nearly two decades ago. This month marks 50 years since the race riots in Cambridge, the small city on Maryland's Eastern Shore that became a crucible for civil rights in 1963.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 17, 2013
I can hear 'em now. "He's a good guy"; "He's a family man"; "He'll govern like a moderate"; "It will be so good for the country"; "He's post-partisan. " That the election of a mixed-race candidate for president sent positive messages about America around the world is without question; that the election occurred less than 50 years after the end of Jim Crow was stunning - and spoke volumes about how far we have progressed on race and politics. Yet, the entire post-partisan narrative was quite a stretch (and silly to boot)
NEWS
Erica L.Green | April 19, 2012
With books in hand, hundreds of prominent black male city leaders and community members will descend on classrooms around the city Monday to read to students, part of an initiative to promote literacy and positive male influences in the lives of city youth. The effort called the "Michael Penny Carter Men Reading in Baltimore City Schools Initiative," was introduced in the city by Marvin "Doc" Cheatham, president of the local the National Action Network, last fall. The program was inspired by a similar one in Chicago, and has drawn the support of local political, education, and religious leaders across the city.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
The Baltimore branch of the NAACP will hold a downtown rally Monday in memory of slain Florida teenager Trayvon Martin. The rally is part of a flurry of action from Maryland churches and civil rights groups seeking to memorialize Martin, the 17-year-old who was unarmed when he was shot and killed Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla., on Feb. 26 by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. "It's a sad, tragic situation," said Baltimore NAACP President Tessa Hill-Aston. "You got a young boy trying to walk away from somebody, drinking a soda and eating candy like any other young person.
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