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Black History Month

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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
The second-grade students at Johnnycake Elementary in Catonsville have discovered that without George Washington Carver, there might not be peanut butter, and if the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had not spoken out, schools might not be integrated. In their Black History Month research, they found ordinary men and women, who struggled and won Nobel prizes, Olympic medals and a firm place in the annals of American history. The 7- and 8-year-olds turned their efforts into a museum for their schoolmates Thursday.
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NEWS
By Johnny Slaughter | February 26, 2014
For years, a group of black men has gathered daily at a cigar shop across from Cross Street Market, here in Baltimore. We talk politics and sports amid plumes of pipe and cigar smoke. However, conversation halts at 7 p.m. when the quiz show "Jeopardy" begins. The wide-screen display, mounted high on an exposed brick wall, shutters conversation when the words: "This. Is. Jeopardy!" bellow from the speakers. An eclectic group of business owners, active/retired police officers, firefighters, salesmen and educators congregate and shout "questions" to the proffered answers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
"Night Catches Us," Tanya Hamilton's complex treatment of the Black Panther legacy, is perfect viewing for Black History Month. Just released on a Magnolia DVD, it is an emotion-charged memory play and a film noir in more ways than one. It contains one human time bomb — a trigger-happy street kid with delusions of political glory — and several characters carrying scars from a fatal police-Panther showdown. It's a personal work of art, not a docudrama. It's a stirring debut for Hamilton as a keen, intuitive writer-director.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
A Perry Hall Middle School student received honors in a recent Black History Month essay competition, according to a news release from Baltimore County Public Schools. Patrick Krack was the second-place winner in M&T Bank's 27th annual "Champions of Courage" contest, which asks participants to write about their personal heroes that shared with them the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King. Krack wrote about the support he received from his basketball coach Terry Bryant as a white student joining a predominantly African-American squad: "Coach Terry Bryant is my Champion of Courage.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Each February, Larry White helps young people transform themselves into Rosa Parks, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders to share stories of African-American history with others in Anne Arundel County. These days, White is busy planning his third annual Black History Month program, which he hopes will attract 200 people eager to learn not only about the past, but about how black leaders influence current events. "We don't just put on a show. We dig down so people can make a difference," said White, a Glen Burnie resident who holds two jobs in addition to his volunteer work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
After a hiatus of more than a year, Soulful Symphony re-emerged last month to perform for a packed house at the Hippodrome Theatre, inaugurating a concert series that continues there Friday night. Thanks to support from the recently launched Hippodrome Arts Fund, the ensemble of predominantly African-American and Latino musicians became the first resident ensemble at the Hippodrome , the flagship of the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center. "It's a new chapter, a new home — but the same soul," said Darin Atwater, the composer, pianist and conductor who founded Soulful Symphony in 2000.
EXPLORE
February 21, 2012
For the past many months, Cable TV's History Channel has been using a rather clever tag line that notes History is made every day. Historians, academics and anyone with a basic knowledge of what came before can have spirited discussions for hours on end as to what history entails, what parts of it are significant, whether people are thrust into positions that make them noteworthy or whether they affect history because they are noteworthy....
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
The viewers stand transfixed, leaning in again and again for a closer look as they inspect 32 panels of photographs that capture both the everyday and the celebratory moments in the lives of Howard County's early black families. Many pull out their cellphones and snap a shot of a relative or someone they know. The exhibit they scrutinize illustrates the tightly interwoven stories of African-Americans who settled in the county from the late 19th century to the mid-1900s, some as many as 90 years before Columbia had even begun to appear.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 19, 2012
A story for Black History Month. Bryan Stevenson is director of the Equal Justice Initiative, a Montgomery, Ala.-based organization he founded in 1989 to provide legal representation for the indigent and incarcerated. The EJI ( www.eji.org ) doesn't charge its clients but, says Mr. Stevenson, he will sometimes require them to read selected books. Last year, Mr. Stevenson sent two books to prisoner Mark Melvin, who is doing life for a murder he committed when he was 14. One was "Mountains Beyond Mountains," about a doctor's struggle to bring medical services to Haiti.
NEWS
By Kaye Wise Whitehead | February 15, 2012
In 1926, Carter G. Woodson, through his organization, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (later renamed the Association for the Study of African American Life and History), founded and promoted Negro History Week. He selected February because Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass' birthdays fell during this month. His desire was for Americans to recognize and celebrate the achievements and accomplishments of black people. The response was overwhelming, as black schools, black churches and black and white community leaders around the country rallied behind this call and pushed Negro History Week to the forefront.
NEWS
January 20, 2012
Sunday, Jan. 22 Concert and dinner "It Was A Very Good Year," a tribute to Frank Sinatra starring Tony Sands, will be held at 2 p.m. at Laurel Mill Playhouse, 508 Main St. in Laurel. Tickets are $15; $40 for admission and dinner at Salute's Restaurant (next to playhouse). Information, call 301-452-2557 or go to laurelmillplayhouse.org. Theater Candlelight Concert Society's CandleKids presents "Henry & Mudge" at 2:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre, Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia.
EXPLORE
December 2, 2011
Giant Food is now accepting entries for its sixth annual Black History Month Essay Contest, which commemorates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders in Maryland; Virginia; Delaware; and Washington, D.C. schools are asked to write on "Making a difference - What can you do to help fight hunger in your community?" Each submission will be judged on originality, creativity and adherence to the essay topic. Two winners will be selected from every grade level.
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