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By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 17, 1993
CUSTER, S.D. -- "Let me know when you see a buffalo," Matt said, not believing we'd ever spot one outside a TV set. He was engrossed in his Game Boy in the back seat -- too busy, he said, to watch boring Black Hills scenery through the minivan windows. That changed in a hurry."Look!" Reggie said excitedly, pointing to the side of the road where a huge, furry brown bison -- that's the correct name for the 2,000-pound animal -- was nonchalantly grazing. A few miles farther, we slowed to let another lumber across in front of the car. Custer State Park, where we were driving, has one of the largest bison herds in the world: 1,400 in the 73,000-acre park.
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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 4, 2006
Imagine sitting in a church or sitting in a synagogue, trying to have a ... prayer service, and you have half a million bikes running by every minute of the day and night for three weeks. That's what the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally does to this environment." -- DEBRA WHITE PLUME, a Lakota Sioux from the nearby Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, explaining the impact of the annual event in which more than 500,000 bikers arrive in the Black Hills each August.
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By John Madson and John Madson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 7, 1991
The motion picture "Dances With Wolves" opens with a Civil War battle sequence filmed in Georgia, but the rest of the movie's locales are in western South Dakota.From the Southern battlefield the action moves to the bleak Dakota Territory outpost to which a young cavalry lieutenant (Kevin Costner) has been assigned -- a ramshackle corral and sod hut built by location crews on a ranch northeast of Rapid City not far from the airport. (Months later, an assessor making her rounds saw a distant building where none had been before.
TRAVEL
By Tom Uhlenbrock and Tom Uhlenbrock,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | July 31, 2005
This is an all-American road trip, filled with cowboys and Indians, buffalo and prairie dogs, and dreamers foolish enough to think they could homestead on the Badlands or blast four presidential faces into a granite cliff of the Black Hills. Within an hour's drive of Rapid City, in the southwestern corner of South Dakota, are so many national parks, memorials, monuments and forests that five days was not enough time to cover them all, especially with detours at scenic turnouts, historical markers and roadside attractions.
FEATURES
By John Madson and John Madson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 7, 1991
For 50 years the giant faces of Washington, Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt and Jefferson have stared out over South Dakota's Black Hills, watching for a committee of VIPs which would formally dedicate Mount Rushmore to the American people.The committee never came. One might have, soon after sculptor Gutzon Borglum's masterwork was completed in 1941 -- but Pearl Harbor was bombed less than two months later, and any dedication plans were bombed with it.What with one thing or another, a formal dedication of the Mount Rushmore Memorial has been on hold ever since.
TRAVEL
By Tom Uhlenbrock and Tom Uhlenbrock,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | July 31, 2005
This is an all-American road trip, filled with cowboys and Indians, buffalo and prairie dogs, and dreamers foolish enough to think they could homestead on the Badlands or blast four presidential faces into a granite cliff of the Black Hills. Within an hour's drive of Rapid City, in the southwestern corner of South Dakota, are so many national parks, memorials, monuments and forests that five days was not enough time to cover them all, especially with detours at scenic turnouts, historical markers and roadside attractions.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | August 31, 2003
When Keith Burden, our designated singing cowboy, recognized my request for an obscure Western anthem I listened to as a kid, I knew we were on the right wagon. No matter that I remembered it as Jingle Jangle and he knew it as Ringle Rangle. Keith strummed his guitar as we sang of a contented cowhand who had "a dollar's worth of beans, a new pair of jeans, and a woman to cook and clean ... and 'things.' " Pretty saucy stuff for what was billed as a "family-approved" attraction, but no one seemed to notice.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 4, 2006
Imagine sitting in a church or sitting in a synagogue, trying to have a ... prayer service, and you have half a million bikes running by every minute of the day and night for three weeks. That's what the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally does to this environment." -- DEBRA WHITE PLUME, a Lakota Sioux from the nearby Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, explaining the impact of the annual event in which more than 500,000 bikers arrive in the Black Hills each August.
TRAVEL
By TONI STROUD SALAMA and TONI STROUD SALAMA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 12, 2006
Before Lara Croft raided electronic tombs, before the Green Lantern protected radio airwaves, long before Spider-Man and Batman and Superman fought public menaces in comic books, Deadwood Dick leapt from the pages of dime novels to thrill a generation in the 1880s with his rough exploits. He was as rugged as they come, and helped put the South Dakota landmark town of Deadwood on the map of American legends. A visit to Deadwood is part of the Midwesterner's classic trip "Out West," taking in such sites as the Black Hills, the Badlands and Mount Rushmore.
NEWS
July 5, 2009
"Black Hills" Nora Roberts (Putnam, $26.95) Twelve years ago in the Black Hills of South Dakota, childhood sweethearts Lil Chance and Coop Sullivan stumbled upon a dead body. The two are reunited when Coop returns home to take care of his grandparents, but someone is haunting and taunting them with vicious pranks and now he must risk his life to save the girl he is still in love with. "The Devil's Punchbowl" Greg Iles (Scribner, $26.99) Attorney Penn Cage has left the courtroom to be mayor of his hometown, Natchez, Miss.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | August 31, 2003
When Keith Burden, our designated singing cowboy, recognized my request for an obscure Western anthem I listened to as a kid, I knew we were on the right wagon. No matter that I remembered it as Jingle Jangle and he knew it as Ringle Rangle. Keith strummed his guitar as we sang of a contented cowhand who had "a dollar's worth of beans, a new pair of jeans, and a woman to cook and clean ... and 'things.' " Pretty saucy stuff for what was billed as a "family-approved" attraction, but no one seemed to notice.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 17, 1993
CUSTER, S.D. -- "Let me know when you see a buffalo," Matt said, not believing we'd ever spot one outside a TV set. He was engrossed in his Game Boy in the back seat -- too busy, he said, to watch boring Black Hills scenery through the minivan windows. That changed in a hurry."Look!" Reggie said excitedly, pointing to the side of the road where a huge, furry brown bison -- that's the correct name for the 2,000-pound animal -- was nonchalantly grazing. A few miles farther, we slowed to let another lumber across in front of the car. Custer State Park, where we were driving, has one of the largest bison herds in the world: 1,400 in the 73,000-acre park.
FEATURES
By John Madson and John Madson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 7, 1991
For 50 years the giant faces of Washington, Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt and Jefferson have stared out over South Dakota's Black Hills, watching for a committee of VIPs which would formally dedicate Mount Rushmore to the American people.The committee never came. One might have, soon after sculptor Gutzon Borglum's masterwork was completed in 1941 -- but Pearl Harbor was bombed less than two months later, and any dedication plans were bombed with it.What with one thing or another, a formal dedication of the Mount Rushmore Memorial has been on hold ever since.
FEATURES
By John Madson and John Madson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 7, 1991
The motion picture "Dances With Wolves" opens with a Civil War battle sequence filmed in Georgia, but the rest of the movie's locales are in western South Dakota.From the Southern battlefield the action moves to the bleak Dakota Territory outpost to which a young cavalry lieutenant (Kevin Costner) has been assigned -- a ramshackle corral and sod hut built by location crews on a ranch northeast of Rapid City not far from the airport. (Months later, an assessor making her rounds saw a distant building where none had been before.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Murphy-Larronde and Suzanne Murphy-Larronde,Special to The Sun | July 3, 1994
In the grandstands of Rapid City's civic center, Alain Beauchamps lets his body sway gently to the hypnotic beat of tribal drums. Below him, male dancers, arrayed in lavish eagle-feather ornaments and bone breastplates, shuffle along the auditorium floor in the symbolic salute to the sun's journey across South Dakota skies. Then, on an invitation from the master of ceremonies, the French doctor, his wife and other spectators join in the dance.It's all standard fare at the Black Hills and Northern Plains Indian Pow Wow and Arts Exposition, an annual South Dakota event that unites Native Americans in a celebration of their enduring culture.
TRAVEL
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 27, 2008
BLACK HILLS, S.D. -- Borglum or Ziolkowski? Within a day of arrival in the Black Hills of South Dakota, you'll run into this question, probably somewhere along U.S. 16 as you roll between two of the largest sculpted mountains on Earth. Gutzon Borglum's Mount Rushmore, of course, is your old friend from elementary school, and you think you know it well. Begun in 1927. Completed in 1941. Scrambled upon by Cary Grant in 1959's North by Northwest and, more recently, Nicolas Cage in National Treasure: Book of Secrets.
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