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By Gregory Kane | November 20, 2004
BILL COSBY'S Wednesday visit to Baltimore did nothing for me but bring back a bad memory, one only a week old. None of this was Cosby's fault, mind you. My experience occurred in Cambridge, Mass., during my three days at a liberal re-education camp. You know it better as the college formerly called Harvard University. OK, so I'm kidding. A little. I spent three days in Cambridge, where members of the Trotter Group, an organization of black columnists, held their annual meeting. There were several symposiums held with liberal cognoscenti in the Charles Hotel and at several places on the Harvard campus.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 16, 2014
I used to get blamed all the time for stuff Bob Steinback said. To be fair, it wasn't always blame -- sometimes it was credit -- and it went both ways. Sometimes, he had to explain to people that it was not he who had written a certain thing, but me. Robert L. Steinback was, as I was and still am, a columnist for The Miami Herald, and and we shared a certain superficial physical similarity, both of us bearded, bald and black. That said, we really didn't look a lot alike. For one thing, I wear glasses and Bob doesn't.
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NEWS
By Gregory Kane | April 21, 1996
WHILE WATCHING the evening news the weekend after Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown was killed in a plane crash, my nephew Joey asked me if I thought Brown's untimely end came about as a result of a conspiracy."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 21, 2013
Rand Paul did just fine at Howard University, thank you very much. Or at least, that's how he remembers it. Mr. Paul, GOP senator from Kentucky, told the Christian Science Monitor on Wednesday that his recent visit to Howard didn't go so bad at all. He said any perception to the contrary was created by -- all together now -- the "left-wing media. " Knowing what we do about the political right's capacity for self-deception, we may trust that he's telling it like it is -- or at least, telling it like he believes it to be. But reality-based Americans know it wasn't left-wing media that insulted students at the historically black school by acting as if a visit to their campus was like a visit with headhunters.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 23, 2006
So here's how my day with The Cos went. I awoke extra early so I could take my insulin and then eat. (And Lord knows I hope it was in that order.) As I figured out the best way to get to Rosemont Elementary/Middle School in the 2700 block of Presstman St. (I didn't even know there was a 2700 block of Presstman St.), I tried to remember the last time I saw Bill Cosby in the flesh. It was also the first time I saw him, in the early months of 1967. Cosby made an appearance at what was then the Baltimore Civic Center.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 9, 1997
"Finally, Hollywood is realizing that gangs are not the only African-American story."That quote is attributed to Chris Hewitt of the St. Paul (Minn.) Pioneer Press. He was commenting about the movie "Love Jones," which was released in mid-March and actually made the top-10 movie list for at least one week."Love Jones" is a love story that stars Larenz Tate, he of "Menace II Society" and "Dead Presidents" fame. In "Menace," Tate played the terrifyingly homicidal O-Dog who, in the opening scene, murders two Korean merchants.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 11, 2007
Dear Don Imus: So how's that suspension working for ya, buddy? You know, Don, you really ought to, as the current slang expression goes, "holla at a brother" sometimes. And I don't necessarily mean me. Any brother would do. You need to stay in the loop when it comes to black folks. If you'd bothered to holla at a brother, Don, you wouldn't be in the fix you're in now. Suspended from your job. The Revvum Jesse Jackson calling for your head. Having to go on the Revvum Al Sharpton's radio show and eat crow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Grossberg | January 29, 1998
Come hear author Tina McElroy Ansa read from her third novel, "The Hand I Fan With."Ansa combines rich spirituality and vivid eroticism in her tale of Lena McPherson, a middle-aged black woman who is financially successful and socially prominent but finds true fulfillment in her love affair with a ghost.In her first book, "Baby of the Family," Ansa introduced the psychic Lena and the fictional town of Mulberry, Ga., near Ansa's real-life birthplace, Macon.After graduating from Spelman College, Ansa became the first black woman to work at the Atlanta Constitution before embarking on her career as one of the most prominent writers of contemporary African-American fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Elena Fernandez | July 24, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- Ever since UPN showed clips of Everybody Hates Chris to advertisers and the media in May, the television industry has been abuzz with one question: How involved will comedian Chris Rock really be? The comedy, inspired by Rock's experiences growing up in the 1980s in Brooklyn, is the critical favorite of the entire fall lineup, but the tide could turn quickly if Rock, who narrates each episode with his own special touch, flies the coop to, say, star in a movie. The pilot first belonged to Fox Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
May 7, 2012
It never ceases to amaze me what I witness written in The Sun every morning when it's delivered to my front door. But the latest editorial ("Henson grabs the spotlight," May 2) shows the continued subtle racist views of a paper famous for its slanted and self-aggrandizing opinions since the days when Charles H. Grasty owned the newspaper in the early 1900s. The facts as you present them are only half-true, as Julius Henson and Rhonda Russell may have suggested a "counterintuitive strategy" on how to turn out the Republican base, and even to persuade African-American voters not to come out. Yet, it was, in fact, the campaign's call to have the authority line displaced from the robocall.
NEWS
May 7, 2012
It never ceases to amaze me what I witness written in The Sun every morning when it's delivered to my front door. But the latest editorial ("Henson grabs the spotlight," May 2) shows the continued subtle racist views of a paper famous for its slanted and self-aggrandizing opinions since the days when Charles H. Grasty owned the newspaper in the early 1900s. The facts as you present them are only half-true, as Julius Henson and Rhonda Russell may have suggested a "counterintuitive strategy" on how to turn out the Republican base, and even to persuade African-American voters not to come out. Yet, it was, in fact, the campaign's call to have the authority line displaced from the robocall.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | October 2, 2007
Does ignorance about race make you a racist? That boiling question bubbles at the heart of the controversy that Fox News star Bill O'Reilly kicked up with his poorly received compliments of black diners in a New York restaurant. My answer is: No, ignorance about race does not always make you a racist, but it can make you sound like one. That's Mr. O'Reilly's problem. He has been vilified recently by the liberal Web site Media Matters for America for insinuating how surprised he was to discover how civilized black folks behaved while dining in Sylvia's, one of Harlem's best-known restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | April 26, 2007
It took the firing of Don Imus to focus mainstream media's attention on the poisonous misogynistic lyrics and glorification of all things obscene and stupid riddling commercial hip-hop. But for more than a decade, progressive black folks (including yours truly) have been discussing and writing about the issue. A depressingly long chain of rappers has called sistas everywhere much worse than "nappy-headed hos," the infamous reference Imus made to the Rutgers female basketball team. In all the controversy, I kept reminding a few unenlightened friends and colleagues that the "hip-hop" in constant rotation on mainstream radio and TV channels such as BET and MTV largely represents the flattest, most unimaginative segment of the genre.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 11, 2007
Dear Don Imus: So how's that suspension working for ya, buddy? You know, Don, you really ought to, as the current slang expression goes, "holla at a brother" sometimes. And I don't necessarily mean me. Any brother would do. You need to stay in the loop when it comes to black folks. If you'd bothered to holla at a brother, Don, you wouldn't be in the fix you're in now. Suspended from your job. The Revvum Jesse Jackson calling for your head. Having to go on the Revvum Al Sharpton's radio show and eat crow.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 24, 2007
It looks like Larry Young may have been right, and the rest of us were probably wrong. Today, Young is a successful talk-show host on WOLB radio. Nine years ago, he was state Sen. Larry Young of Baltimore, expelled from the General Assembly after his colleagues voted him out for alleged ethics violations. Young cried foul. Actually, he did more than that. Young contended that he was targeted because he was black. Some scoffed at the notion and accused him of playing the race card. Full disclosure requires me to say that I was one of them.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | January 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- This time he's not kidding. "As many of you know, over the last few months I have been thinking hard about my plans for 2008," Sen. Barack Obama said Tuesday in his announcement of his presidential intentions on his Web site. In those initial moments, the Illinois Democrat reminded me of the gag video he recorded with a very similar beginning for ABC's Monday Night Football. But this time, Mr. Obama was not pulling our collective leg. He's beginning the process of a presidential run. And unlike every other candidate of known African descent who has come before him, Mr. Obama actually has a chance to be nominated and, perhaps, even win the grand prize.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 29, 1997
SO THERE I was, sitting in the studio of WERQ radio, talking to morning-show hosts Frank Ski and Miss Toni, when that ever-annoying topic of writing "negative" stories about black folks came up.A couple of callers to the show claimed I write nothing but negative columns about black folks. They mentioned specifically the one about the death of rapper the Notorious B.I.G., also known as Biggie Smalls, in which I once again brought up the subject of the high homicide rate among young black men.Exactly why we should ignore that homicide rate and insist that we be told only things that make us feel good wasn't exactly made clear.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 2, 1997
Somewhere along the line a group of black folks decided we own February. Oh, don't try to deny it. Those of you reading this -- and I don't care what your ethnic group is -- have harbored the suspicion for a while now.It was confirmed to me last Monday, when a caller left a voice mail message that I paraphrase thusly:"I felt the showing of 'Schindler's List' with no commercial interruptions during Black History Month was 'insensitive.'"This is a minority opinion, I say to myself. Don't get upset.
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | December 19, 2006
City officials in Vidor, Texas, screamed foul when news broke that their town was once one of America's notorious "sundown towns" for blacks. In the segregation era, that was the town fathers' not-so-discreet way of warning black people that they would be jailed, assaulted or worse if they were caught in town after dark. Vidor officials vehemently insisted that they have long since disavowed that naked, in-your-face racism. They contend that the press latched onto the town's woeful past to grab cheap, sensationalist headlines.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 23, 2006
So here's how my day with The Cos went. I awoke extra early so I could take my insulin and then eat. (And Lord knows I hope it was in that order.) As I figured out the best way to get to Rosemont Elementary/Middle School in the 2700 block of Presstman St. (I didn't even know there was a 2700 block of Presstman St.), I tried to remember the last time I saw Bill Cosby in the flesh. It was also the first time I saw him, in the early months of 1967. Cosby made an appearance at what was then the Baltimore Civic Center.
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