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By Robert B. Hill | July 21, 1997
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS ago, as director of research for the National Urban League, I wrote a book, ''The Strengths of Black Families,'' to counteract the unbalanced treatment of black families in research studies as well as in the media.The typical portrayal of black families focuses on the weaknesses of a disadvantaged ''underclass,'' while excluding any consideration of the large majority of working-class, middle-class, and upper-class families. Answers are rarely sought to such questions as, ''Why eight out of 10 black families are not on welfare?
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
 Soledad O'Brien will be at Towson University next Wednesday to lead a discussion of her "Black in America" documentary series.  "My ultimate goal is to help people have a conversation about race in America," the former CNN anchor said.  It's likely to be a charged event.  Some students formed a White Student Union on Towson's campus two years ago, with members conducting "safety patrols" at night.  The group is not officially recognized by Towson University because it has not met certain requirements to become a sanctioned organization.
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NEWS
By Nancy Lawson and Nancy Lawson,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1990
Mondawmin Mall was alive with more than the sounds of pre-Christmas shoppers yesterday as singers at the fourth annual "Salute to Black Families" turned the shopping center into a choir hall.A pastor urged the audience of about 50 people to shun the "me-ism" trend so prevalent in American culture today in favor of strong family values."My dear brothers and sisters, we must watch the family as it shifts from the 'us' to the 'I,' " said Father Peter Bramble, of St. Katherine's Episcopal Church in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
Baltimore police used battering rams to smash their way into suspected drug dens in a series of pre-dawn raids Tuesday that netted a half-dozen arrests, continuing what authorities describe as aggressive campaign to "dismantle" the Black Guerrilla Family gang. It was the second such strike in less than a week. Officials sharpened their rhetoric against the one-time prison gang they say has been spreading across the city and taking over drug territories through force and intimidation.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Sara Neufeld, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2009
Four local educators - including a two-time Baltimore mayoral candidate - are listed among endorsers of a black empowerment handbook that federal authorities say was written and distributed by the leader of a violent prison gang to spread its message. The most prominent is Andrey L. Bundley, who garnered 33 percent of the votes in a 2003 mayoral primary, ran again in 2007 and now oversees alternative education for the Baltimore school system. He is quoted on the book's back cover as giving "kudos" to Eric Brown, an alleged leader of the Black Guerrilla Family and the book's author.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 14, 2000
MIAMI --Here's the question the reader asked: What's wrong with black women? The reason it stopped me is that the reader was herself a black woman. She was responding to a column I wrote defending the right of basketball star Kobe Bryant, who is African-American, to marry a woman who's white. And the question she asked found echo in the questions many other women posed. Fine, let Kobe marry a white woman, they said. But why is it every time a black man becomes successful, he leaves us behind?
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1997
Robert B. Hill doesn't deny that almost half of black American families are headed by single women, or that most of those women's children live in poverty, or that those facts are cause for concern.But Hill says black families -- including many low-income ones headed by single women -- often have strengths that are seldom noticed: a solid work ethic; high aspirations for their children; broad kinship support networks, and a strong religious foundation."I'm not advocating the single-parent household.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 16, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The composition of the U.S. family, particularly the black family, has undergone major changes over the past two decades, according to a new study by the U.S. Census Bureau.Traditional families -- those headed by married couples -- have decreased from 87 percent of all family households in the nation in 1970 to 79 percent in March of this year, the study showed.At the same time, the number of families maintained by women with no husband present in the house doubled over the last 20 years, from 5.5 million to 10.9 million this year.
BUSINESS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
A free, monthly magazine aimed at black families will appear at supermarkets, libraries and churches in May, publisher Rudy Miller said yesterday.The magazine, with the working title Jubilee: Celebrating African-American Families, is to be published by Alliance Media Inc., a subsidiary of The Baltimore Sun Co. Alliance also publishes Maryland Family and Fifty Plus magazines.Miller, Alliance publisher and WMAR-TV morning news anchor, said she would soon hire a black editor for the magazine.
FEATURES
By Greg Braxton and Greg Braxton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2002
The Michael Kyles and the Bernie Macs live in the town of Wednesday Night Prime. Both families reside in large, fashionable homes and have adorable kids. Though they dwell on separate blocks, they are aware of each other, being the only black families in the community. Though all has been neighborly between them so far, the peaceful coexistence may end this fall, when the families will be forced to live next door to each other. Fox is moving The Bernie Mac Show, which premiered last season to critical and popular acclaim, to the Wednesday 8 p.m. slot against My Wife and Kids.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Baltimore police, prosecutors and federal agents launched a massive strike against the Black Guerrilla Family gang this week, after indicting 48 suspects in an alleged eight-year campaign of drug dealing and violence that claimed 10 lives. The breadth of the coordinated operation reflects the growing concern over the BGF's role on the streets of Baltimore. Authorities say the one-time prison gang is using force and intimidation to take control of neighborhoods drug corner by drug corner - one reason, they say, violent crime is on the rise.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
A woman who supplied Black Guerrilla Family gang members with drugs to sell at the Baltimore jail pleaded guilty Wednesday to a conspiracy charge in federal court. Tyesha Mayo, 30, obtained marijuana and prescription pills and handed them off to corrupt corrections officers, who smuggled them past the walls of the Baltimore City Detention Center and into the hands of gang leader Tavon White, according to facts supporting her plea presented in court. In return, White paid Mayo using electronic transfers and cash, according to the statement.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Barbara Poindexter saw the death of her son coming. She likens it to watching her mother's health deteriorate. In her son's case, death followed a slow and agonizing descent into gangs and criminal activity. "When my mother came to the end, I was not surprised," Poindexter said. "When my son came to the end, I was not surprised. "I just didn't know when. " On May 4, 2012, Quintin Poindexter got out of a car with three men, who were recorded on surveillance video walking behind Windsor Hills Elementary School.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
As Tyrone Brown sat in his jail cell at the Baltimore County Detention Center late last year, awaiting trial for the murder of a man in a Towson Town Center parking garage, he kept busy in part by smoking marijuana and memorizing contraband writings of the Black Guerrilla Family - the same gang prosecutors say he killed to become a part of. Meanwhile, Frank Williams, who helped Brown plot the 2011 mall attack and was arrested with a group of...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 18, 2013
If the federal prison that gets Tavon White is anything like the last one I visited, even a charmer such as Bulldog will have a tough time recreating the life of the libertine he had at the Baltimore City Detention Center. White, a reputed leader of the Black Guerrilla Family prison gang, is accused of attempted murder; he's been on trial twice for that charge since 2009. Both trials ended in hung juries, and that explains why White, or "Bulldog," had enough time at the jail to get four of its correctional officers pregnant, one of them twice, according to recent federal indictments.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Ian Duncan and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
In the black market of Maryland's prisons and jails, where the right price can secure cellphones and drugs, transactions unfold through a complex system of currency. Among the key elements: 14-digit codes, prepaid debit cards and text messages. One brand of cards - Green Dot - is so ubiquitous that it has become part of the lexicon on the inside. The recent federal indictment of two dozen inmates and corrections officers in an alleged Black Guerrilla Family corruption scandal at the Baltimore City Detention Center notes several instances in which suspects refer to "dots" in transactions.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1999
The broken tombstones and sunken graves at Ellsworth Cemetery are telling signs that the oldest black graveyard in Carroll County may not survive into the next century.The cemetery on Leidy Road near Route 140 in eastern Westminster dates back nearly 150 years and was for decades the only place where African-American families could bury their loved ones. Former slaves, veterans from both world wars and generations who have lent their names to roads and towns in Carroll are interred there.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
Eric Addison, managing editor, US Black Engineer Information Technology The Sally family can't even remember life without a computer. They have three in their West Baltimore home, and at some point of the day one of them is running. Maybe it's one of the four kids -- Big Ed, Eddie, Tameka or Catrina -- researching a paper, playing video games or surfing the Internet. Or maybe Mom is chatting online. Everyone in the family has at least one e-mail account. "You've got to have a computer," said Dad, Edward Jr. "It would be like not having a telephone, an answering machine or even a fax machine."
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | March 8, 2013
The banner at Greenmount Avenue and Preston Street proclaims the Lillian Jones Apartments are coming. For the past year, I've watched this building take shape in a neighborhood that needed all the help it could get. Come spring, new tenants will begin moving into these 74 units of affordable housing. As City Councilman Carl Stokes told me, Greenmount and Preston had been a "horrible corner. " That's changed as work crews complete the apartment building and rebuild numerous adjacent rowhouses.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
In Baltimore, authorities are finding that if they can't solve a robbery, the next best thing may be to set one up.  Five men - at least three who police say are members of the Black Guerilla Family - were indicted last week in federal court on robbery charges. They didn't commit a robbery, but were caught in recorded conversations with a government source planning and preparing to carry one out, according to court records.  It's a tactic that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has used at least three times here, and which the Federal Bureau of Investigation also used in a case involving a man charged with accepting a murder-for-hire proposal.  A spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Administration - which was involved in this month's indictment - said the agency had "done this type of investigation many times before; all have been successful," but said he could not discuss the case in further detail.
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