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NEWS
February 8, 2002
UMBC president to speak on black experience in Ala. New Zion Center of Hope in Ellicott City will hear speaker Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, at 11 a.m. Sunday as part of African-American Freedom Month. Hrabowski will talk about his experience as a member of an Alabama church that was bombed 1963, killing four girls, and about his role as the president of a research university. The New Zion church is at 8565 Main St. Information: the Rev. John P. Carter, 410-465-3366.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 8, 2013
Harry Anderson, a magician and comic (made famous by his stint as the judge on the old sitcom "Night Court"), used to have a routine where he'd promise to juggle George Washington's ax. I'm quoting from memory here, but he'd say something like: "I have here George Washington's original ax -- the one he used to chop down the cherry tree. " He'd wait a beat, and then add: "Of course, a few years ago the blade broke and had to be replaced. And about a decade before that it got a new handle.
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NEWS
By Charles M. Christian | June 23, 2005
IT'S NOT JUST what's inside Baltimore's new Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture that makes it so special. An innovative program will soon bring the museum into classrooms across Maryland and help cement the state's reputation as a national leader in teaching the black experience. It's vital that we take creative steps like this. A full appreciation of our nation's story is a critical social anchor, and you simply don't know American history if you don't know the black experience.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 16, 2011
This is for those who keep asking what I think of Herman Cain. In particular, it's for those who want to know what the tea party's embrace of this black businessman turned presidential candidate says about my claim that the tea party is racist. I might eat the plate of crow those folks proffer if I'd ever actually made that claim. What I have said, fairly consistently, is something more nuanced: Racial animus is an element of tea party ideology, but not its entirety. As I once noted in this space, the tea party probably would not exist if Condoleezza Rice were president.
FEATURES
By John Bordsen and John Bordsen,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 26, 1993
The author's goal, stated in the book flaps and prologue, is as intriguing as it is immense: Hit the road and find out what it is like to be a black American in these times.And so, Walt Harrington, a writer for the Washington Post's Sunday magazine, set off on three journeys -- through the South, the North and the West. Through more than 100 conversation vignettes, he offers a treatment that's somewhat interesting but inherently flawed.Mr. Harrington's subjects are affluent and impoverished, urban and rural, old and young, meek and violent, unknown and famous (filmmaker Spike Lee in New York, author Dori Sanders in York, S.C.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Anyone intimately familiar with the nation's capital knows of its significant African-American population, a community both highly visible and deeply entrenched. Yet rarely has the district's longtime status as a hub of black history and culture been properly recognized, at least on a grand scale. That's all changed with the launch of Blues & Dreams, a citywide tourism thrust using the arts, literature and history to spotlight the black experience. The campaign kicked off in September and runs through the end of this month.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 29, 1995
Almost nothing is black and white when it comes to blacks and television. What looks to be a step forward often turns out to be two or more steps back.Just as "The Cosby Show" was being hailed as one of the most progressive sitcoms ever, along came a study that found many white viewers used the upper-middle-class status of the Huxtable family as proof that black Americans no longer faced any barriers in the real world.L In other words, the series helped them justify their racism.And just as we were about to applaud network television for creating a realistic, working-class comedy about blacks after decades of eye-rolling stereotypes like "Good Times," Fox cancels "Roc."
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson | May 28, 1995
"Pryor Convictions: And Other Life Sentences," by Richard Pryor with Todd Gold. 257 pages. New York: Pantheon Books. $23Richard Pryor looks out from the cover of this sad, honest autobiography with a distant, pained stare, eyes just this side of tears. His expression says: I have seen and done things you wouldn't believe, and a lot of it hurt.He's made the de rigueur trip to the Betty Ford Clinic. Had multiple nervous breakdowns, a quadruple bypass, six wives. Shot his Mercedes and set himself on fire.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | June 23, 1996
25 years ago (week of June 20-26, 1971):The Thomas Viaduct in Elkridge was declared a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior.Plans were announced for the Institute for the Study of the Black Experience in Howard County under the sponsorship of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Institute volunteers planned to reconstruct the county's black heritage from church records and similar documentation, as well as from interviews with older county residents.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 8, 2013
Harry Anderson, a magician and comic (made famous by his stint as the judge on the old sitcom "Night Court"), used to have a routine where he'd promise to juggle George Washington's ax. I'm quoting from memory here, but he'd say something like: "I have here George Washington's original ax -- the one he used to chop down the cherry tree. " He'd wait a beat, and then add: "Of course, a few years ago the blade broke and had to be replaced. And about a decade before that it got a new handle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 8, 2010
In her most memorable line from "Precious," Mo'Nique's character plaintively asks, "Who is going to love me?" But that's a question the Baltimore County-born actress may never have to ask again, not after receiving a standing ovation for winning the best supporting actress Oscar at Sunday night's 82nd annual Academy Awards. "God bless us all," said the composed, but clearly emotional, actress, whose star turn in "Precious" has garnered widespread, critically acclaim and numerous awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | March 8, 2010
- In her most memorable line from "Precious," Mo'Nique's character plaintively asks, "Who is going to love me?" But that's a question the Baltimore County-born actress may never have to ask again, not after receiving a standing ovation for winning the best supporting actress Oscar at Sunday night's 82nd annual Academy Awards. "God bless us all," said the composed, but clearly emotional, actress, whose star turn in "Precious" has garnered widespread, critical acclaim and numerous awards.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | December 12, 2007
Morris Chestnut never met any actors from the 1970s films about street-wise cops, flashy hustlers, pimps and prostitutes that defined African-American culture on the big screen then - a genre that came to be known as "blaxploitation." But he and other young African-American actors were still dealing with that imagery years later, when films about black teen life in the 'hood were a hit in Hollywood in the 1990s. They frequented auditions for gangster roles, suppressing mixed emotions about playing such parts and sometimes getting rejected with words that resonate to this day. "Sorry, not black enough."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 8, 2006
If African-Americans don't buy artworks by African-American artists, who will? A decade ago, that question prompted a group of black collectors in Washington to join together to share their knowledge and experience. They wanted to create a forum where they could discuss African-American art, make group visits to artists' studios and find ways to support local artists, dealers and visual arts programs. The fruits of their efforts are on display this month in Holding Our Own, a lovely exhibition of African-American artworks owned by members of the Collectors Club of Washington at the University of Maryland University College in Adelphi.
NEWS
October 4, 2005
AUGUST WILSON once said that jazz and blues music were an affirmation and celebration of the value and worth of the African-American spirit. Let us add a coda to that thought: So are the plays of August Wilson. The playwright's death Sunday is a tremendous loss to the American cultural repertory. He ranks among our greatest writers, his prize-winning plays offering a unique, vivid and powerful insight into the contemporary black experience. Mr. Wilson often described himself as a poet who turned into a playwright.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 3, 2005
August Wilson, one of the most accomplished, ambitious and prolific playwrights in the history of the American theater, died yesterday of liver cancer. The 60-year-old playwright had most recently been working on revisions of Radio Golf, the 10th and final play in his monumental, decade-by-decade series chronicling the African-American experience in the 20th century. The cycle - whose plays garnered two Pulitzer Prizes and a host of other awards - stands as an unprecedented achievement.
NEWS
October 4, 2005
AUGUST WILSON once said that jazz and blues music were an affirmation and celebration of the value and worth of the African-American spirit. Let us add a coda to that thought: So are the plays of August Wilson. The playwright's death Sunday is a tremendous loss to the American cultural repertory. He ranks among our greatest writers, his prize-winning plays offering a unique, vivid and powerful insight into the contemporary black experience. Mr. Wilson often described himself as a poet who turned into a playwright.
NEWS
By Tiffanie Mobley | September 17, 1998
SO WHERE are you considering going to school?"This was the most-asked question my senior year in high school. Often comments praising the historically black college and university system were followed by how important it was for me to receive a truly "black experience" in college. I was being pressured.Guidance counselors set up tours for me to visit many of the historically black colleges in Atlanta. I was impressed with Spelman College's philosophy that education is a journey in an effort to develop the total black woman.
NEWS
By Charles M. Christian | June 23, 2005
IT'S NOT JUST what's inside Baltimore's new Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture that makes it so special. An innovative program will soon bring the museum into classrooms across Maryland and help cement the state's reputation as a national leader in teaching the black experience. It's vital that we take creative steps like this. A full appreciation of our nation's story is a critical social anchor, and you simply don't know American history if you don't know the black experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Anyone intimately familiar with the nation's capital knows of its significant African-American population, a community both highly visible and deeply entrenched. Yet rarely has the district's longtime status as a hub of black history and culture been properly recognized, at least on a grand scale. That's all changed with the launch of Blues & Dreams, a citywide tourism thrust using the arts, literature and history to spotlight the black experience. The campaign kicked off in September and runs through the end of this month.
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