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NEWS
December 13, 1990
Maryland leads the nation in black-owned businesses. That is impressive. According to U.S. Census Bureau figures, 8.9 percent of Maryland businesses are black-owned, nearly triple the national average of 3.1 percent. Department of Economic and Employment Development secretary J. Randall Evans attributes the phenomenon to "a favorable business climate."Yet there are other reasons that better explain this development. Maryland's black population is twice the national benchmark. Also at work is the role government contracting plays in Maryland's economy.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 26, 2010
Ray Haysbert engineered a leveraged buyout before most people knew what it was. With a ton of debt and an ounce of equity, he bought Baltimore-based Parks Sausage from an affiliate of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1980, presaging the leveraged buyout craze of the 1980s and today's massive "private equity" deals. In corporate financing, as in other things, Raymond V. Haysbert Sr. was an outlier. As Parks' right-hand man in the 1950s, he helped build the company into a regional brand.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
Linda Ervin didn't wake yesterday intending to chase blue sky.But the 44-year-old owner of E & S Janitorial & Associates couldn't help steering her car toward New Psalmist Baptist Church after hearing a radio report about Baltimore's first African-American Economic Summit.Ervin joined 175 fellow black entrepreneurs for the two-day free event aimed at attracting more black businesses and jobs to the city. Ervin and her partner, Valerie Daniel, started their janitorial service a year ago, after working 10 years for other companies.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
Linda Ervin didn't wake yesterday intending to chase blue sky.But the 44-year-old owner of E & S Janitorial & Associates couldn't help steering her car toward New Psalmist Baptist Church after hearing a radio report about Baltimore's first African-American Economic Summit.Ervin joined 175 fellow black entrepreneurs for the two-day free event aimed at attracting more black businesses and jobs to the city. Ervin and her partner, Valerie Daniel, started their janitorial service a year ago, after working 10 years for other companies.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
Martin Luther King III will lead the nation's new crop of civil rights activists into Baltimore today to participate in the city's first African-American Economic Summit.The two-day free event at New Psalmist Baptist Church hopes to lure young black entrepreneurs into the city to create new business and jobs.Baltimore City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III organized the conference as the next step in the African-American civil rights movement. Bell hopes new black-owned businesses can begin to replace companies and jobs that have fled Baltimore in the past 30 years.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 26, 2010
Ray Haysbert engineered a leveraged buyout before most people knew what it was. With a ton of debt and an ounce of equity, he bought Baltimore-based Parks Sausage from an affiliate of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1980, presaging the leveraged buyout craze of the 1980s and today's massive "private equity" deals. In corporate financing, as in other things, Raymond V. Haysbert Sr. was an outlier. As Parks' right-hand man in the 1950s, he helped build the company into a regional brand.
BUSINESS
By Oscar Suris and Oscar Suris,Orlando Sentinel | April 4, 1992
ATLANTA -- A national conference of black business leaders yesterday identified black entrepreneurial efforts as the key to a new economic civil rights movement.Disappointed with the welfare system and frustrated by legal challenges to set-aside programs, some blacks are embracing entrepreneurship as the best tool they have against economic inequities that have kept some of them from acquiring wealth.More than 300 prominent blacks from academia, government and the manufacturing and service industries discussed the challenges facing black entrepreneurs at a national conference sponsored by Dow Jones & Co., the publishers of The Wall Street Journal.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
Reggie Cook has put a post-apartheid spin on an old bit of advice: Instead of going west to seek his fortune, Mr. Cook has decided to go South -- as in South Africa.When Mr. Cook started getting interested in the country four years ago, he was as skeptical as the next person. But a bit of research convinced him that once apartheid and the international economic boycott was lifted, South Africa would be a great place to do business, especially for an African-American."I got to know the people.
NEWS
May 9, 1991
Today's school children may read of Floyd McKissick or learn about the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) from history books. But during the turbulent 1960s, Mr. McKissick was a daily news event. Time and again, he raised hackles with speeches, led charged-up demonstrators or found new ways to challenge the restrictions of separate and unequal status for blacks.Mr. McKissick, 69, died April 28. At the height of his influence, during the chaotic days of Vietnam war protests, few of his opponents knew he had won a Purple Heart during World War II. He attended North Carolina College, then, represented by Thurgood Marshall, sued to become the first black student at the University of North Carolina law school.
NEWS
October 18, 1993
Completing a fully leased office building project these economically distressed days is a remarkable achievement. It is all the more remarkable for a small developer who has never pulled off a project of that magnitude. The fact it was achieved by an African-American developer is simultaneously historic and irrelevant.Otis Warren Jr. had every reason to act like a proud parent at the formal opening of the $38 million City Crescent office development on Howard Street several weeks ago. The market for commercial real estate is bleak; financing for it from banks and other lenders who have been battered by its collapse is scarce indeed.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
Martin Luther King III will lead the nation's new crop of civil rights activists into Baltimore today to participate in the city's first African-American Economic Summit.The two-day free event at New Psalmist Baptist Church hopes to lure young black entrepreneurs into the city to create new business and jobs.Baltimore City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III organized the conference as the next step in the African-American civil rights movement. Bell hopes new black-owned businesses can begin to replace companies and jobs that have fled Baltimore in the past 30 years.
NEWS
By Julianne Malveaux | June 30, 1995
THE LONG-AWAITED White House review of affirmative action policy seems to be more political posturing than policy audit. This became clear when a White House staffer reportedly said that angry black politicians made the White House look good in the eyes of the "angry white men" who have motivated the review of civil rights and affirmative action programs. But can the White House handle angry black businessmen, too?The Supreme Court has already lightened the president's political load. The court's recent decision, Adarand vs. Pena, does allow minority set-aside programs, but requires "strict scrutiny" instead of the "intermediate scrutiny" that was previously required.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
When Robert L. Wallace's book "Black Wealth Through Black Entrepreneurship" hit bookstores in summer 1993, it didn't exactly break sales records. But the book did win Mr. Wallace plenty of attention, and placed him on a whole new track in life.First, there were newspaper and magazine articles and book reviews. A slew of radio talk-show appearances came after that. Then came the fan mail -- up to 50 letters a month -- along with an occasional missive accusing Mr. Wallace of promoting "reverse discrimination."
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
Reggie Cook has put a post-apartheid spin on an old bit of advice: Instead of going west to seek his fortune, Mr. Cook has decided to go South -- as in South Africa.When Mr. Cook started getting interested in the country four years ago, he was as skeptical as the next person. But a bit of research convinced him that once apartheid and the international economic boycott was lifted, South Africa would be a great place to do business, especially for an African-American."I got to know the people.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1994
After nearly nine years as a laser printer repairman, Ron Hoff decided to go into business for himself. But, like many budding black entrepreneurs, he ran up against the money wall."
NEWS
October 18, 1993
Completing a fully leased office building project these economically distressed days is a remarkable achievement. It is all the more remarkable for a small developer who has never pulled off a project of that magnitude. The fact it was achieved by an African-American developer is simultaneously historic and irrelevant.Otis Warren Jr. had every reason to act like a proud parent at the formal opening of the $38 million City Crescent office development on Howard Street several weeks ago. The market for commercial real estate is bleak; financing for it from banks and other lenders who have been battered by its collapse is scarce indeed.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | December 11, 1990
DOROTHY RUSH peers expectantly from behind the counter of her new business in Baltimore's Northeast Market. A few prospective customers are examining the rows of greeting cards and children's books that line the front of the stall where Rush, her daughter and a niece are hoping to make a go of it as entrepreneurs."
BUSINESS
By Oscar Suris and Oscar Suris,Orlando Sentinel | April 4, 1992
ATLANTA -- A national conference of black business leaders yesterday identified black entrepreneurial efforts as the key to a new economic civil rights movement.Disappointed with the welfare system and frustrated by legal challenges to set-aside programs, some blacks are embracing entrepreneurship as the best tool they have against economic inequities that have kept some of them from acquiring wealth.More than 300 prominent blacks from academia, government and the manufacturing and service industries discussed the challenges facing black entrepreneurs at a national conference sponsored by Dow Jones & Co., the publishers of The Wall Street Journal.
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