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By Dallas Morning News | June 11, 1991
Black teen-agers have been big fans of "Video Soul" and other Black Entertainment Television programs since the cable network made its debut 11 years ago. Now Robert L. Johnson, chairman and founder of BET, is banking on their loyalty with a new magazine for black teens called Young Sisters and Brothers.For the past few months, BET has aired slick commercials during music video programs, urging young viewers to phone a 900-number and order 10 issues of YSB for $11.95. Paige Communications, a BET subsidiary, plans to distribute the first issue in August.
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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
BET has a mixed history when it comes to news, documentaries and public affairs - and much of it is for the worse. With a former programming emphasis on music videos and a record of little or no serious commitment to news, questions have regularly been raised whether Black Entertainment Television was serving its audience or exploiting it. The paucity of serious news and first-rate public affairs programs was impossible not to notice. The National Association of Black Journalists gave BET its "Thumbs Down Award" in 2007.
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By Greg Braxton and Greg Braxton,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 13, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- The faded brick warehouse on a dirty and nearly hidden street near downtown Los Angeles looks like the last place in the world for a Hollywood revolution.The building, just a stone's throw from the Lacy Street Cabaret, with its promise of "LIVE NUDE GIRLS," couldn't look more weathered and bland.The painted brick that reads "Dyer Industrial Textiles" has seen better days. Only the trailers, cable and cars that line the street hint that there is more happening within.The inside of the building, which was formerly used as a sound stage for "Cagney & Lacey," is another world entirely.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | December 17, 2002
Sen. Trent Lott tried last night to salvage his political career by appearing on a media outlet that the 61-year-old conservative white lawmaker is unlikely to watch much at home: Black Entertainment Television on cable. BET is the country's sole channel aimed squarely at African-American viewers; its music and entertainment offerings draw significant audiences every day, especially among younger viewers. But it is those entertainment shows, not its shrinking news programming, that represent BET's current strength - and in the minds of some critics, its weakness, as well.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- BET Holdings Inc. founder Robert Johnson and Liberty Media Corp. agreed yesterday to pay $378 million, or $63 a share, for the part of the cable-television company they don't already own, raising an initial bid by almost a third.The parent of Black Entertainment Television will become a privately held company controlled by Johnson and Liberty, who already had more than 90 percent voting control. Johnson also is BET's chairman and chief executive.Black Entertainment Television is the largest remaining independent cable channel, reaching 50 million viewers.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1995
The head of Black Entertainment Television plans to launch a chain of entertainment-themed restaurants in Prince George's County.BET Soundstage, a 360-seat restaurant featuring American cuisine, is scheduled to open next fall in Largo, said Robert L. Johnson.It will become the anchor establishment in a "restaurant park" being developed by the Rouse Co. at Landover and Lottsford roads, just north of USAir Arena, he said.Video cameras in the restaurant will put diners on screen, if they want, and allow for more interactive dining.
FEATURES
By Jube Shiver Jr. and Jube Shiver Jr.,Los Angeles Times | August 20, 1991
Only two years ago, Black Entertainment Television founder Bob Johnson seemed something of a pariah in Hollywood.His Washington-based cable network's reliance on music videos and other inexpensive shows drew widespread criticism from black producers who accused Johnson of squandering the resources of the nation's only black-owned cable channel. And Johnson seemed equally testy about Hollywood, saying, "I don't get excited sitting around with Hollywood types talking about programming."But with the recent boom in black filmmaking and black artists' prominence on the nation's record charts, Johnson, 45, has been busy mending his fences in Tinseltown and converting his detractors.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | March 28, 2001
The head of Black Entertainment Television, buffeted by criticism, took to his network's airwaves late Monday in a remarkable hour-long program to say he had fired popular talk show host Tavis Smiley because he sold an interview to ABC News. "There was not enough mutual business respect," said BET founder and CEO Robert L. Johnson, in response to one of many skeptical questioners. "There's no reason why we should force a relationship." Johnson's appearance was intended to counter the impression that the move was prompted by BET's new corporate parent, Viacom.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Robert L. Johnson, the founder of Black Entertainment Television, emerged yesterday as a key participant in United Airlines' $11.6 billion attempt to acquire US Airways. Under the proposed deal, a new company - DC Air - would be formed with Johnson in charge. Unlike what occurs with most start-up companies, he would be getting a ready-made airline, picking up most of US Airways' East Coast routes. That would give the new airline 122 daily departures to 44 cities and 3 million passengers a year.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 17, 1999
THE NAACP has prided itself on issuing report cards on politicians and businesses, handing out A's to those sympathetic to the "civil rights agenda" and flunking those who supposedly fall short of the organization's criteria.So let's grade the recent NAACP conference, held last week in New York City, during which the organization made several resolutions and covered numerous topics, several of which have generated controversy.Emergency resolution on Sudan: The NAACP gets an A+ for this one. In a powerfully worded, three-page resolution, the NAACP condemned the government of Sudan for human rights abuses, genocide, slavery and supporting terrorism.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | March 28, 2001
The head of Black Entertainment Television, buffeted by criticism, took to his network's airwaves late Monday in a remarkable hour-long program to say he had fired popular talk show host Tavis Smiley because he sold an interview to ABC News. "There was not enough mutual business respect," said BET founder and CEO Robert L. Johnson, in response to one of many skeptical questioners. "There's no reason why we should force a relationship." Johnson's appearance was intended to counter the impression that the move was prompted by BET's new corporate parent, Viacom.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Robert L. Johnson, the founder of Black Entertainment Television, emerged yesterday as a key participant in United Airlines' $11.6 billion attempt to acquire US Airways. Under the proposed deal, a new company - DC Air - would be formed with Johnson in charge. Unlike what occurs with most start-up companies, he would be getting a ready-made airline, picking up most of US Airways' East Coast routes. That would give the new airline 122 daily departures to 44 cities and 3 million passengers a year.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 17, 1999
THE NAACP has prided itself on issuing report cards on politicians and businesses, handing out A's to those sympathetic to the "civil rights agenda" and flunking those who supposedly fall short of the organization's criteria.So let's grade the recent NAACP conference, held last week in New York City, during which the organization made several resolutions and covered numerous topics, several of which have generated controversy.Emergency resolution on Sudan: The NAACP gets an A+ for this one. In a powerfully worded, three-page resolution, the NAACP condemned the government of Sudan for human rights abuses, genocide, slavery and supporting terrorism.
FEATURES
By Greg Braxton and Greg Braxton,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 13, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- The faded brick warehouse on a dirty and nearly hidden street near downtown Los Angeles looks like the last place in the world for a Hollywood revolution.The building, just a stone's throw from the Lacy Street Cabaret, with its promise of "LIVE NUDE GIRLS," couldn't look more weathered and bland.The painted brick that reads "Dyer Industrial Textiles" has seen better days. Only the trailers, cable and cars that line the street hint that there is more happening within.The inside of the building, which was formerly used as a sound stage for "Cagney & Lacey," is another world entirely.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- BET Holdings Inc. founder Robert Johnson and Liberty Media Corp. agreed yesterday to pay $378 million, or $63 a share, for the part of the cable-television company they don't already own, raising an initial bid by almost a third.The parent of Black Entertainment Television will become a privately held company controlled by Johnson and Liberty, who already had more than 90 percent voting control. Johnson also is BET's chairman and chief executive.Black Entertainment Television is the largest remaining independent cable channel, reaching 50 million viewers.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 3, 1997
They're the most important folks in the newspaper business. Which means I'm not talking about columnists, editors, reporters or photographers.I'm talking about readers, Gawd love 'em. Not only are they the country's last line of defense against illiteracy, they actually keep us newspaper folks employed. It is with them in mind that I present another edition of "Readers Strike Back," in which the Black Racist Uncle Tom (B.R.U.T.) Gregory Kane is hoisted on his own petard.Leo Williams of Baltimore responded to the July 19 column about John H. Johnson, publisher and CEO of Johnson Publishing Co. Ebony publisher has much to teach.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 3, 1997
They're the most important folks in the newspaper business. Which means I'm not talking about columnists, editors, reporters or photographers.I'm talking about readers, Gawd love 'em. Not only are they the country's last line of defense against illiteracy, they actually keep us newspaper folks employed. It is with them in mind that I present another edition of "Readers Strike Back," in which the Black Racist Uncle Tom (B.R.U.T.) Gregory Kane is hoisted on his own petard.Leo Williams of Baltimore responded to the July 19 column about John H. Johnson, publisher and CEO of Johnson Publishing Co. Ebony publisher has much to teach.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | December 17, 2002
Sen. Trent Lott tried last night to salvage his political career by appearing on a media outlet that the 61-year-old conservative white lawmaker is unlikely to watch much at home: Black Entertainment Television on cable. BET is the country's sole channel aimed squarely at African-American viewers; its music and entertainment offerings draw significant audiences every day, especially among younger viewers. But it is those entertainment shows, not its shrinking news programming, that represent BET's current strength - and in the minds of some critics, its weakness, as well.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1995
The head of Black Entertainment Television plans to launch a chain of entertainment-themed restaurants in Prince George's County.BET Soundstage, a 360-seat restaurant featuring American cuisine, is scheduled to open next fall in Largo, said Robert L. Johnson.It will become the anchor establishment in a "restaurant park" being developed by the Rouse Co. at Landover and Lottsford roads, just north of USAir Arena, he said.Video cameras in the restaurant will put diners on screen, if they want, and allow for more interactive dining.
FEATURES
By Jube Shiver Jr. and Jube Shiver Jr.,Los Angeles Times | August 20, 1991
Only two years ago, Black Entertainment Television founder Bob Johnson seemed something of a pariah in Hollywood.His Washington-based cable network's reliance on music videos and other inexpensive shows drew widespread criticism from black producers who accused Johnson of squandering the resources of the nation's only black-owned cable channel. And Johnson seemed equally testy about Hollywood, saying, "I don't get excited sitting around with Hollywood types talking about programming."But with the recent boom in black filmmaking and black artists' prominence on the nation's record charts, Johnson, 45, has been busy mending his fences in Tinseltown and converting his detractors.
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