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BUSINESS
January 24, 2001
Notes and quotes about your money: STAR QUALITY: This week's Barron's says Goldman Sachs Group Inc.'s ace stock-picker Abby Joseph Cohen selects these stocks for top performance in 2001: MetLife Inc., Ecolab Inc., Applied Materials Inc., Amdocs Ltd. and Coach Inc. MORE PICKS: Black Enterprise, February, picks American International Group Inc., Citigroup Inc., EMC Corp., Medtronic Inc. and Tyco International Ltd. GOOD STRATEGY: "Recently, the Wall Street Journal printed letters mostly from people moaning about 2000 results," says Moneypaper.
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NEWS
By ANDREA WALKER and ANDREA WALKER,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
When Black Enterprise magazine was first published 36 years ago, its founder challenged readers to imagine the day when there would be a black chief executive officer or president of a major company. Now, there are Robert Johnson, Dick Parsons, Stanley O'Neal and a host of others. As black America continues to make strides in the business world, Black Enterprise is undergoing leadership changes. In January, founder Earl Graves Sr. passed the reins to his son, Earl "Butch" Graves Jr., who took on the roles of chief executive and president.
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BUSINESS
May 12, 1998
Ten Maryland companies are included in Black Enterprise magazine's 100 biggest black-owned businesses in 1997.Pulsar Data Systems Inc. of Lanham ranked No. 9 with 1997 revenue of $151 million.Other Maryland companies in the top 50 were Baltimore-based Stop Shop Save Food Markets, No. 22 with sales of $86.5 million; Baltimore-based La-Van Hawkins Urban City Foods, Burger King, No. 24 at $86.4 million; Forestville-based Pepsi-Cola of Washington, D.C. LP, No. 32 at $61 million; Baltimore-based Super Pride Markets, No. 47 at $42.5 million; and Lanham-based Washington Cable Supply Inc., No. 48 at $42 million.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 1, 2004
ELGIN VALLEY, South Africa - When South Africa held its first fully democratic elections in 1994, Patrick Kraukamp, a black day laborer, was just starting a job as a forklift driver at the Paul Cluver wine estate in this lush mountain valley. Ten years later, Kraukamp still drives a forklift from time to time. But now many of the casks of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon he shuttles between the cool storage rooms of the vineyard warehouse are of his own making. Sold under the Thandi label - a Xhosa word meaning love - Kraukamp's award-winning wines are shipped to supermarket shelves across South Africa, England and Japan and will soon be appearing in the United States.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | April 21, 2000
"Companies with a record of raising dividends provide superior stock appreciation," money manager Charles E. Babin says in Forbes, May 1. "Find the firms that religiously boost their stock prices by dividend hikes, and you've got a bunch of winners. The point isn't what the yield is. It's how often they offer good news about dividend hikes." The article lists, as examples, Home Depot Inc., Citigroup Inc., Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Hewlett-Packard Co. and Walt Disney Co. MONEY MATTERS: "Whether single or married, more women now invest on their own, and discuss their strategies (either with a financial planner or broker)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | January 21, 2000
"GENUINE financial planning is not only about earning the highest return," says Financial Perspectives. "Top planners also help you reduce financial stress, plan for retirement, pay off student and other loans, save taxes, meet insurance needs and make sure your estate plan is in order." "When investing for the long haul, calculate the amount you need to save, sock away 10 to 15 percent of your after-tax income, seek professional help, learn the basics, identify an investment strategy, and consult experts when necessary."
NEWS
By ANDREA WALKER and ANDREA WALKER,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
When Black Enterprise magazine was first published 36 years ago, its founder challenged readers to imagine the day when there would be a black chief executive officer or president of a major company. Now, there are Robert Johnson, Dick Parsons, Stanley O'Neal and a host of others. As black America continues to make strides in the business world, Black Enterprise is undergoing leadership changes. In January, founder Earl Graves Sr. passed the reins to his son, Earl "Butch" Graves Jr., who took on the roles of chief executive and president.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | October 31, 2001
WHAT'S to be done with investments now? Money magazine, November, says, "Although investors are severely shaken by the terrorist attacks, there is no reason to abandon these successful practices: "Stocks offer the best way to participate in the long-term growth of the economy. "Don't forget bonds. Quality bonds provide good income and are less volatile than stocks. "Don't `time' the market. Investors get in trouble when they try to be smarter than everyone else. "Never overlook diversification.
NEWS
August 30, 1999
Columbia Bank certified by SBA for loan program The Columbia Bank has announced that it has satisfied requirements from the Small Business Administration and been awarded Certified Lenders Program status. Commercial loans approved under this program are partially guaranteed by the SBA. Benefits to small- to medium-sized businesses include an accelerated loan approval process and the partial guarantees, which reduce collateral requirements. Agriculture tour to visit farm enterprises in county The Howard County Fall Agriculture Tour will begin at 8: 30 a.m. Sept.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
One of Morgan State University's best-known alumni returned to campus yesterday with a broad smile and a big promise: the gift of $1 million for the business school.Earl G. Graves, publisher and founder of Black Enterprise magazine, said he made the pledge in honor of his publication's 25th anniversary this summer.Flanked by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, Gov. Parris N. Glendening and his own family members, Mr. Graves said the pledge represented his support for black self-sufficiency."We have neglected, turned away from, and perhaps even dismantled our own strong and once vital institutions," said Mr. Graves, whose magazine chronicles black entrepreneurs and businesses.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2002
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., the country's oldest black fraternity, has entered into a $30 million deal with Church's Chicken to acquire franchises in inner city neighborhoods and create a new pool of African-American business owners. The Baltimore-based fraternity will acquire at least one franchise and help its members buy 49 others over the next five years. The agreement is part of an initiative by the fraternity to develop neglected neighborhoods and open the door to business opportunities for minorities.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | October 31, 2001
WHAT'S to be done with investments now? Money magazine, November, says, "Although investors are severely shaken by the terrorist attacks, there is no reason to abandon these successful practices: "Stocks offer the best way to participate in the long-term growth of the economy. "Don't forget bonds. Quality bonds provide good income and are less volatile than stocks. "Don't `time' the market. Investors get in trouble when they try to be smarter than everyone else. "Never overlook diversification.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2001
Notes and quotes about your money: STAR QUALITY: This week's Barron's says Goldman Sachs Group Inc.'s ace stock-picker Abby Joseph Cohen selects these stocks for top performance in 2001: MetLife Inc., Ecolab Inc., Applied Materials Inc., Amdocs Ltd. and Coach Inc. MORE PICKS: Black Enterprise, February, picks American International Group Inc., Citigroup Inc., EMC Corp., Medtronic Inc. and Tyco International Ltd. GOOD STRATEGY: "Recently, the Wall Street Journal printed letters mostly from people moaning about 2000 results," says Moneypaper.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | April 21, 2000
"Companies with a record of raising dividends provide superior stock appreciation," money manager Charles E. Babin says in Forbes, May 1. "Find the firms that religiously boost their stock prices by dividend hikes, and you've got a bunch of winners. The point isn't what the yield is. It's how often they offer good news about dividend hikes." The article lists, as examples, Home Depot Inc., Citigroup Inc., Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Hewlett-Packard Co. and Walt Disney Co. MONEY MATTERS: "Whether single or married, more women now invest on their own, and discuss their strategies (either with a financial planner or broker)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | January 21, 2000
"GENUINE financial planning is not only about earning the highest return," says Financial Perspectives. "Top planners also help you reduce financial stress, plan for retirement, pay off student and other loans, save taxes, meet insurance needs and make sure your estate plan is in order." "When investing for the long haul, calculate the amount you need to save, sock away 10 to 15 percent of your after-tax income, seek professional help, learn the basics, identify an investment strategy, and consult experts when necessary."
NEWS
August 30, 1999
Columbia Bank certified by SBA for loan program The Columbia Bank has announced that it has satisfied requirements from the Small Business Administration and been awarded Certified Lenders Program status. Commercial loans approved under this program are partially guaranteed by the SBA. Benefits to small- to medium-sized businesses include an accelerated loan approval process and the partial guarantees, which reduce collateral requirements. Agriculture tour to visit farm enterprises in county The Howard County Fall Agriculture Tour will begin at 8: 30 a.m. Sept.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1997
Earl G. Graves has always been clear about what he wanted.Even as a business student at then-Morgan State College in the late 1950s, he would proclaim to anyone who asked: "I want to make a lot of money and I want to create change."Graves has spent much of his life doing just that, moving from selling corsages on campus to real estate in Brooklyn, N.Y., in the 1960s to large corporate ads for Black Enterprise magazine when he started it in 1971.His Morgan classmates laughed at his ambitions, Graves says in his new book, "How to Succeed in Business Without Being White."
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
Raymond V. Haysbert has lots of war stories from the days when the founders of Parks Sausage Co. were trying to make their mark, but few gall him more than the one about the time in the 1950s when a Baltimore bank wouldn't lend them $25,000 for inventory when they had $30,000 in the bank."
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1998
Robert E. De'Shazo, owner of Pulaski Tire Service, walked away from the Black Entrepreneurship Weekend at Morgan State University last year with a deal to service a company's fleet of vehicles, and two interns who helped him research his business plan.Not bad for a first-time event, he said.And for that reason, Black Professional Men Inc. and the university's Earl G. Graves School of Business and Management will play host to their second annual Black Entrepreneurship Weekend on Nov. 6 and 7.The two-day event at Morgan's McKeldin Center offers black-owned or black-operated businesses a venue where they can sell the community on their services and products, hire interns and employees, and attend business workshops.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1998
Ten Maryland companies are included in Black Enterprise magazine's 100 biggest black-owned businesses in 1997.Pulsar Data Systems Inc. of Lanham ranked No. 9 with 1997 revenue of $151 million.Other Maryland companies in the top 50 were Baltimore-based Stop Shop Save Food Markets, No. 22 with sales of $86.5 million; Baltimore-based La-Van Hawkins Urban City Foods, Burger King, No. 24 at $86.4 million; Forestville-based Pepsi-Cola of Washington, D.C. LP, No. 32 at $61 million; Baltimore-based Super Pride Markets, No. 47 at $42.5 million; and Lanham-based Washington Cable Supply Inc., No. 48 at $42 million.
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