Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlack Dolls
IN THE NEWS

Black Dolls

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | December 20, 1992
Q: I recently started to collect black dolls. How can I find out more about them and their values? Where can I find more dolls?A: Black dolls, folk and fancy, dating from the 19th and 20th centuries are of interest to doll collectors and those who collect black memorabilia. A 9 1/2 -inch realistic-looking black baby doll with a finely modeled porcelain head and limbs dressed in tweed knickers and matching cap is the first limited-edition issued for doll artist Yolanda Bello's Yolanda's Precious Playmates series; it's $69.95 until Dec. 31, 1993, when the edition closes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
Baltimore County prosecutors said yesterday they will not press criminal charges against two men who hung a black-painted doll from a noose last week at a Woodstock trailer park.County State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor said the display may have been offensive, but it did not violate Maryland's hate crime law because it was set up on the property of one of the men."We checked the criminal code and there are no crimes against defacing your own doll on your own property," O'Connor said."This is not even a close call, as far as the law is concerned.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1995
On the surface, it seems like such a small gesture. A doll for a child halfway across the world; gifts for children who have much more basic needs in life. Like decent housing. Food. A good education.So why this campaign to bring black dolls to the children of South Africa?Yes, black South Africans have more pressing needs, says Paulette Pace, the Baltimore coordinator for the campaign. "And there are other people helping with those needs," she says.But during the days of apartheid, there weren't many black dolls to be found in South Africa.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
Baltimore County prosecutors said yesterday they will not press criminal charges against two men who hung a black-painted doll from a noose last week at a Woodstock trailer park.County State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor said the display may have been offensive, but it did not violate Maryland's hate crime law because it was set up on the property of one of the men."We checked the criminal code and there are no crimes against defacing your own doll on your own property," O'Connor said."This is not even a close call, as far as the law is concerned.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | February 12, 1992
NEW YORK -- Valerie Williams is introducing a new doll, a cute-as-they-come, 13-inch-tall newcomer named Kenya -- an African-American doll, Ms. Williams explained, "who has no white counterpart."In Toytown U.S.A. this season, this is a big deal.It is not that Kenya is all by herself in Black Dollyland. Indeed, she joins Shani, Asha, Nichelle, Shauntee, Imani, Najwa, Janita, Amandla and the Huggy Bean family on the shelves.But Ms. Williams, marketing director for Tyco Industries, posits that Kenya is different:"Traditionally, black dolls were an afterthought to white dolls.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 21, 1994
IMAGINE that you are a 12-year-old black child who has lived her entire childhood in a succession of foster homes and faces almost no prospect of being adopted. Imagine further that you know the statistics -- of the 500,000 children in foster care, half are members of minority groups, yet white children are three times more likely than blacks to be adopted.You would be excused if you concluded that white racism was sentencing you to an inferior life. It isn't.Across the country, in case after heart-wrenching case, white parents who attempt to adopt black children are thwarted by a social-work system that places racial purity above other considerations in deciding the fates of children.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 15, 1993
Alethea Churchman was having a ball. In the course of 15 minutes, the 4-year-old had had her picture taken with Santa, received a bunch of candy canes and won a Barbie doll as a door prize. She was spinning in circles so fast her mother could hardly contain her.Alethea and her mother, Edith Churchman, had come to a black doll show in East Rutherford, N. J., to find something for Christmas."I want to expose Alethea to the ethnic toys that are out there," Mrs. Churchman said as she took Alethea's hand and they walked over to a vendor who was displaying Rastafarian dolls selling for $95.But these dreadlocked dolls with their crocheted hats were just a few of the items being displayed at Linda Stewart's seventh annual black doll show.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
Baltimore County prosecutors said yesterday they will not press criminal charges against two men who hung a black-painted doll from a noose last week at a Woodstock trailer park.County State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor said the display may have been offensive, but it did not violate Maryland's hate crime law because it was set up on the property of one of the men."We checked the criminal code and there are no crimes against defacing your own doll on your own property," O'Connor said."This is not even a close call, as far as the law is concerned.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
Baltimore County prosecutors said yesterday they will not press criminal charges against two men who hung a black-painted doll from a noose last week at a Woodstock trailer park.County State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor said the display may have been offensive, but it did not violate Maryland's hate crime law because it was set up on the property of one of the men."We checked the criminal code and there are no crimes against defacing your own doll on your own property," O'Connor said."This is not even a close call, as far as the law is concerned.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 12, 1998
The Board of Estimates approved yesterday a $50,000 request from the Baltimore state's attorney's office to pay for DNA testing, expert witnesses and psychiatrists in the death penalty cases against Joseph R. Metheny, a suspected serial killer.Metheny, who was sentenced last month to a 40-year prison term for kidnap and assault, is charged with killing two women in the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood where he lived and burying their bodies in a nearby wooded area in 1996.Metheny is scheduled to go to trial in the death penalty cases April 22.Man sought in 1981 slaying is arrested north of SeattleA man wanted in connection with a slaying outside a city after-hours club in 1981 has been arrested in a town north of Seattle.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1995
On the surface, it seems like such a small gesture. A doll for a child halfway across the world; gifts for children who have much more basic needs in life. Like decent housing. Food. A good education.So why this campaign to bring black dolls to the children of South Africa?Yes, black South Africans have more pressing needs, says Paulette Pace, the Baltimore coordinator for the campaign. "And there are other people helping with those needs," she says.But during the days of apartheid, there weren't many black dolls to be found in South Africa.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 21, 1994
IMAGINE that you are a 12-year-old black child who has lived her entire childhood in a succession of foster homes and faces almost no prospect of being adopted. Imagine further that you know the statistics -- of the 500,000 children in foster care, half are members of minority groups, yet white children are three times more likely than blacks to be adopted.You would be excused if you concluded that white racism was sentencing you to an inferior life. It isn't.Across the country, in case after heart-wrenching case, white parents who attempt to adopt black children are thwarted by a social-work system that places racial purity above other considerations in deciding the fates of children.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 15, 1993
Alethea Churchman was having a ball. In the course of 15 minutes, the 4-year-old had had her picture taken with Santa, received a bunch of candy canes and won a Barbie doll as a door prize. She was spinning in circles so fast her mother could hardly contain her.Alethea and her mother, Edith Churchman, had come to a black doll show in East Rutherford, N. J., to find something for Christmas."I want to expose Alethea to the ethnic toys that are out there," Mrs. Churchman said as she took Alethea's hand and they walked over to a vendor who was displaying Rastafarian dolls selling for $95.But these dreadlocked dolls with their crocheted hats were just a few of the items being displayed at Linda Stewart's seventh annual black doll show.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | December 20, 1992
Q: I recently started to collect black dolls. How can I find out more about them and their values? Where can I find more dolls?A: Black dolls, folk and fancy, dating from the 19th and 20th centuries are of interest to doll collectors and those who collect black memorabilia. A 9 1/2 -inch realistic-looking black baby doll with a finely modeled porcelain head and limbs dressed in tweed knickers and matching cap is the first limited-edition issued for doll artist Yolanda Bello's Yolanda's Precious Playmates series; it's $69.95 until Dec. 31, 1993, when the edition closes.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | February 12, 1992
NEW YORK -- Valerie Williams is introducing a new doll, a cute-as-they-come, 13-inch-tall newcomer named Kenya -- an African-American doll, Ms. Williams explained, "who has no white counterpart."In Toytown U.S.A. this season, this is a big deal.It is not that Kenya is all by herself in Black Dollyland. Indeed, she joins Shani, Asha, Nichelle, Shauntee, Imani, Najwa, Janita, Amandla and the Huggy Bean family on the shelves.But Ms. Williams, marketing director for Tyco Industries, posits that Kenya is different:"Traditionally, black dolls were an afterthought to white dolls.
NEWS
May 3, 2005
HE WASN'T a fiery orator, litigator or politician, but Kenneth B. Clark, the psychologist, educator and longtime student of race relations, played a key role in America's civil rights fight. And almost until his death this week at the age of 90, he was a fierce force for racial integration in education and, by extension, American life and society. He enjoyed a distinguished career in New York academic circles, as a professor at City College and as the first black member of the New York State Board of Regents, trying to set high academic standards and remove achievement gaps among students long before the national trend.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | August 15, 1991
The Arita family, who lives in Saki City, Osaka, says many Japanese have little sensitivity when it comes to racial issues.So the Aritas formed a group to combat racism. Yesterday, the family visited Baltimore at the invitation of black-owned companies promoting business ties between black American and Japanese firms.The family operates the Association to Stop Racism Against Blacks in Japan. Founded in 1988, the organization has fought to remove from Japanese society products demeaning to blacks -- such as black dolls with exaggerated facial features and Little Black Sambo toys.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.