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By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | April 8, 2001
"In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World It Made," by Norman F. Cantor. The Free Press, 245 pages, $25. From the 1950s to the early 1980s, Americans popped antibiotics, vaccinated their children and assumed that infectious disease would soon be an enemy as obsolete as the woolly mammoth. Then came AIDS. Today it seems naive to believe humans will ever achieve total victory in their ancient contest with microbes. Human immunodeficiency virus is annihilating half a generation in parts of Africa.
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NEWS
By Lawrence Brown | July 22, 2013
The George Zimmerman verdict continues to reverberate across the nation, and the nation is coming to terms with the purported notion that we live in post-racial society. I didn't know Trayvon Martin. But nearly a month after the Florida teen was killed, in February 2012, someone I did know, a young 23-year-old black man named Brandon Simms, was murdered in McCulloh Homes in Baltimore's Upton community. In all probability, other young black men killed him. Brandon had reportedly been involved in the drug trade in his past, but he had turned his life around and was working and earning money legitimately.
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BUSINESS
May 13, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The marketer of Black Death vodka said yesterday that it has agreed to sell the liquor in the United States under the name Black Hat, satisfying federal regulators who had concluded that the old label was illegal and misleading.The announcement marked a capitulation by Black Death USA, which has imported the beet-based Belgian brew for a couple of years and has pitched it in advertising that featured Slash of the hard-rock group Guns N' Roses. The liquor's packaging was decorated with a smiling skull and coffin.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | December 11, 2006
Thomas Edward Bittner, a retired envelope company employee and a World War II prisoner of war who survived the Black Death March, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Perry Point. The lifelong resident of Baltimore County was 86. An Army Air Forces sergeant, he flew 23 missions before he was shot down over Austria and captured July 4, 1944. He was imprisoned in Stalag Luft IV, a German prisoner of war camp. In February 1945, as Russian forces approached from the east, he was among thousands of American and Allied prisoners forced to walk hundreds of miles west and north in the bitter cold in what became known as the Black Death March.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | December 11, 2006
Thomas Edward Bittner, a retired envelope company employee and a World War II prisoner of war who survived the Black Death March, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Perry Point. The lifelong resident of Baltimore County was 86. An Army Air Forces sergeant, he flew 23 missions before he was shot down over Austria and captured July 4, 1944. He was imprisoned in Stalag Luft IV, a German prisoner of war camp. In February 1945, as Russian forces approached from the east, he was among thousands of American and Allied prisoners forced to walk hundreds of miles west and north in the bitter cold in what became known as the Black Death March.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 24, 1992
The plague -- a relative of the "black death" that nearly wiped humans from the planet in the 14th and 15th centuries -- is the ostensible subject of "Quiet Killer," a pretty good made-for-TV movie premiering tonight on CBS (at 9 o'clock, WBAL-Channel 11).But a subtler plague is perhaps the deeper part of the peril projected: a slow epidemic of urban malaise, characterized by poverty, prejudice and political indifference. The film suggests that if one plague doesn't get us the other might.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
In his best-selling book, When Bad Things Happen to Good People, Rabbi Harold S. Kushner called the Book of Job "the greatest, fullest, most profound discussion of the subject of good people suffering ever written." For 2,500 years, this story of the man whose unshakable faith was tested by a frightful succession of undeserved evils has provoked much commentary, as well as hundreds of novels, poems and plays. Artists, too, have been inspired by the story, which is the idea behind The Sweet Uses of Adversity: Images of the Biblical Job, an exhibit at the Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis that includes some 50 representations of the protagonist culled from 10 museums and two private collections.
NEWS
By Wiley Hall 3rd | August 27, 1991
There probably are more black doctors now than at any time in the nation's history -- some 16,000, according to the National Medical Association.Yet the black community appears sicker than ever. Every year, according to federal estimates, some 60,000 black men, women, children and infants die of illnesses that should have/could have been prevented."When you look at the problems -- infant mortality, hypertension, cancer, cardio-vascular disease -- our health is the worst that it's been for a long, long time," said Dr. Levi Watkins, the internationally renowned heart surgeon and professor at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Richard Preston | October 14, 1994
Princeton, N.J. -- IN A TERRIFYING reminder of the Middle Ages, the pneumonic plague -- the deadliest form of the bacterial disease once known as the Black Death -- has broken out in India.Pneumonic plague is a lethal airborne contagious disease that was supposedly eliminated by modern medicine.The plague will be stopped, because today its victims can be cured with antibiotics. But what if there had been an outbreak of an airborne virus?Viruses don't respond to antibiotics, and can cause what experts call a chain of lethal transmission.
NEWS
By Obie Patterson | December 12, 2002
Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has vowed to rescind Maryland's death penalty moratorium as soon as he's sworn into office. If so, seven inmates currently on death row - six of whom are black - could soon be eligible for execution. Yet a statewide poll conducted earlier this year found that at least 60 percent of African-Americans support the current moratorium on the use of the death penalty. Consider: Maryland has one of the highest percentages of black death row inmates in the country - more than 70 percent.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | September 15, 2006
In a decision that ends one of the most controversial cases in Anne Arundel County, federal officials said yesterday they will not bring civil rights charges against six white men in the 2004 death of a black Pasadena teenager after a brawl. "We don't have grounds to prosecute," said Cynthia Magnuson, a spokeswoman for the civil rights division of the U.S. Department of Justice. To win a case, officials would have had to prove that 17-year-old Noah Jamahl Jones died in a racially motivated attack and because he was exercising a federally protected right.
NEWS
By CAROL MOTSINGER | February 12, 2006
ANNAPOLIS -- The death rate for African-Americans is higher than that for whites throughout Maryland, where the population of blacks and other minorities continues to grow and combined could constitute half the state's population by 2010. These were among the findings of a state report on the relative health of minorities in Maryland. The report, which surveyed Baltimore City and all but two of the state's 23 counties, found that affluent Talbot County on the Eastern Shore has the largest gap between the death rates for non-Hispanic whites and blacks.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | January 21, 2006
An Anne Arundel County judge has dismissed the $1 million lawsuit filed by the family of teenager Noah Jamahl Jones against the owners of the Pasadena home where a July 2004 brawl began that led to Jones' death. Circuit Judge Paul F. Harris Jr. faulted Jones for coming to the home owned by Steven and Evelyn Steinbach with a group of armed friends and then fighting. "Jamahl Jones should have called 911 or left the scene. His own distinct, prominent, decisive act contributed to his death," Harris wrote in the seven-page opinion that was filed last week.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 19, 2002
YORK, Pa. - Two white men convicted in the 1969 race-riot killing of a black preacher's daughter were sentenced yesterday to spend at least 4 1/2 and 9 years in prison. York County Judge John C. Uhler handed down the sentences - 4 1/2 years to 10 years for Gregory H. Neff and 9 years to 19 years for Robert N. Messersmith - at the end of an emotional court hearing in which Messersmith leveled new accusations against former York Mayor Charlie Robertson. The former mayor was acquitted in October of charges that as a police officer he offered encouragement and bullets to the white gang members who killed Lillie Belle Allen.
NEWS
By Obie Patterson | December 12, 2002
Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has vowed to rescind Maryland's death penalty moratorium as soon as he's sworn into office. If so, seven inmates currently on death row - six of whom are black - could soon be eligible for execution. Yet a statewide poll conducted earlier this year found that at least 60 percent of African-Americans support the current moratorium on the use of the death penalty. Consider: Maryland has one of the highest percentages of black death row inmates in the country - more than 70 percent.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
In his best-selling book, When Bad Things Happen to Good People, Rabbi Harold S. Kushner called the Book of Job "the greatest, fullest, most profound discussion of the subject of good people suffering ever written." For 2,500 years, this story of the man whose unshakable faith was tested by a frightful succession of undeserved evils has provoked much commentary, as well as hundreds of novels, poems and plays. Artists, too, have been inspired by the story, which is the idea behind The Sweet Uses of Adversity: Images of the Biblical Job, an exhibit at the Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis that includes some 50 representations of the protagonist culled from 10 museums and two private collections.
NEWS
By CAROL MOTSINGER | February 12, 2006
ANNAPOLIS -- The death rate for African-Americans is higher than that for whites throughout Maryland, where the population of blacks and other minorities continues to grow and combined could constitute half the state's population by 2010. These were among the findings of a state report on the relative health of minorities in Maryland. The report, which surveyed Baltimore City and all but two of the state's 23 counties, found that affluent Talbot County on the Eastern Shore has the largest gap between the death rates for non-Hispanic whites and blacks.
NEWS
By Lawrence Brown | July 22, 2013
The George Zimmerman verdict continues to reverberate across the nation, and the nation is coming to terms with the purported notion that we live in post-racial society. I didn't know Trayvon Martin. But nearly a month after the Florida teen was killed, in February 2012, someone I did know, a young 23-year-old black man named Brandon Simms, was murdered in McCulloh Homes in Baltimore's Upton community. In all probability, other young black men killed him. Brandon had reportedly been involved in the drug trade in his past, but he had turned his life around and was working and earning money legitimately.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | April 8, 2001
"In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World It Made," by Norman F. Cantor. The Free Press, 245 pages, $25. From the 1950s to the early 1980s, Americans popped antibiotics, vaccinated their children and assumed that infectious disease would soon be an enemy as obsolete as the woolly mammoth. Then came AIDS. Today it seems naive to believe humans will ever achieve total victory in their ancient contest with microbes. Human immunodeficiency virus is annihilating half a generation in parts of Africa.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1997
A veteran Annapolis fire captain has retired amid a federal probe into allegations that he refused to help a black man, who had suffered a heart attack, and used a racial slur to refer to the man after the man died.Gene Kirchner, a 30-year veteran, would not comment on the allegations yesterday. He denied that his departure had anything to with the investigation. "I wanted to retire," said Kirchner, who is white.A spokesman for Baltimore's FBI office, Special Agent Larry K. Foust, said a federal civil rights investigation was launched several weeks ago and could result in criminal charges.
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