Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlack Crowes
IN THE NEWS

Black Crowes

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 13, 2000
Jimmy Page & the Black Crowes Live at the Greek (TVT 2140) There was a time when any garage band worth its salt knew at least a couple Led Zeppelin songs - if not an entire album's worth. It wasn't just that Zeppelin was, in its prime, one of the most popular bands in the world, or that Zep's guitar, bass and drums lineup put the group's repertoire within reach of garage-band instrumentation. Led Zeppelin cranked out some of the most memorable riffs in heavy rock, and any band capable of covering "Whole Lotta Love," "The Lemon Song" or "Sick Again" was allowed - if only for a moment - to share in that glory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 5, 2010
Maestro Mahler, Meet Dr. Freud Here's one of those meetings where you just wish you could have been a fly on the wall: In 1910, the great conductor and composer Gustav Mahler met with the father of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud. What was said wasn't recorded; the media was nowhere around. But Mahler, who was suffering from severe depression at the time, later praised their "interesting discussion. " Saturday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, led by Marin Alsop, presents a words-and-music re-creation of their meeting, through selections from Mahler's symphonies and songs.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Morse and Steve Morse,The Boston Globe | March 31, 1995
Why worry? The latest Black Crowes record hasn't burned up the charts -- unlike the group's previous two -- but band members aren't ready to weep about it.The Crowes have reached a point where they're tired of being "a stooge to a record company," singer Chris Robinson says. They want to be judged for more than Top 40 success. They're looking for a community of fans, not for validation through the record industry and MTV.It's a radical view, but then, the Crowes have become a radical band.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2007
Just announced Teena Marie, Lyfe Jennings, Kindred the Family Soul -- DAR Constitution Hall in Washington on Aug. 19. 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.com. Floetry -- Rams Head Live on July 30. 410-244-1131 or ramsheadlive.com. Amel Larrieux -- The 9:30 Club in Washington on Aug. 10. 800-955-5566 or tickets.com. Rooney -- Recher Theatre in Towson on Aug. 18. 410-337-7210, 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.com. The Black Crowes -- Sonar on Aug. 7. 410-327-8333 or ticketmaster.com. Still available Marilyn Manson, Slayer -- Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia on July 20. 410-547-SEAT or tick etmaster.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 20, 1996
When the Black Crowes was planning its current mini-tour, the group didn't want to play the kind of halls it normally visited. "We're just trying to play alternative venues," says guitarist Rich Robinson, over the phone from a tour stop in Chicago. "Not alternative in the music sense, but alternative to what people normally play."Unfortunately, that search for "alternative venues" ended up forcing the Crowes to find an alternative to playing in Maryland. ,, Not only was a proposed show in Ocean City shot down by the city fathers, but attempts to play Baltimore's Pier Six fell through, too. It was enough to leave the band wondering what Maryland has against them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brooke Nevils | November 2, 2006
Black Crowes One of the few contemporary bands to share the stage with Jimmy Page, the Rolling Stones, Aerosmith and the Who, the Black Crowes are playing Rams Head Live on Tuesday. Since its 1990 debut album Shake Your Money Maker went multiplatinum, the band has gone through a series of breakups and reformations, including lead singer Chris Robinson's marriage to and recent separation from actress Kate Hudson. The show begins at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday night at Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2004
Eats Great Sage, a new Clarksville restaurant from the owners of Roots Market, offers a menu of sophisticated vegetarian and vegan options. page 14 P I C K O F T H E W E E K What: Rich Robinson (co-founder and guitarist from the Black Crowes) When: Sunday; doors open at 7 p.m. Where: The Funk Box, 10 E. Cross St. Why: HeM-Fs promoting Paper, his first solo album. Find out for yourself how he does without the rest of the Crowes. Tickets: $12, available by calling the box office at 410-625-2000 or Ticketmaster at 410-547-SEAT.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2007
Just announced Teena Marie, Lyfe Jennings, Kindred the Family Soul -- DAR Constitution Hall in Washington on Aug. 19. 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.com. Floetry -- Rams Head Live on July 30. 410-244-1131 or ramsheadlive.com. Amel Larrieux -- The 9:30 Club in Washington on Aug. 10. 800-955-5566 or tickets.com. Rooney -- Recher Theatre in Towson on Aug. 18. 410-337-7210, 410-547-SEAT or ticketmaster.com. The Black Crowes -- Sonar on Aug. 7. 410-327-8333 or ticketmaster.com. Still available Marilyn Manson, Slayer -- Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia on July 20. 410-547-SEAT or tick etmaster.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 14, 1991
ZZ Top may describe itself as "that little old band from Texas," but there was nothing small-scale about its performance at the Capital Centre last night.It wasn't enough that the band built its own personal auto graveyard on stage; there was also a working electromagnetic crane, a car compactor and perhaps the most pulchritudinous construction workers imaginable to make it all work.Yet, no matter how spectacular the effect, the staging never detracted from the central focus: the blues.From the classic slow grind "Jesus Left Chicago" to the modern abstractions of "My Head's in Mississippi," the group worked its way through almost every imaginable permutation of the blues.
NEWS
November 5, 2010
Maestro Mahler, Meet Dr. Freud Here's one of those meetings where you just wish you could have been a fly on the wall: In 1910, the great conductor and composer Gustav Mahler met with the father of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud. What was said wasn't recorded; the media was nowhere around. But Mahler, who was suffering from severe depression at the time, later praised their "interesting discussion. " Saturday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, led by Marin Alsop, presents a words-and-music re-creation of their meeting, through selections from Mahler's symphonies and songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brooke Nevils | November 2, 2006
Black Crowes One of the few contemporary bands to share the stage with Jimmy Page, the Rolling Stones, Aerosmith and the Who, the Black Crowes are playing Rams Head Live on Tuesday. Since its 1990 debut album Shake Your Money Maker went multiplatinum, the band has gone through a series of breakups and reformations, including lead singer Chris Robinson's marriage to and recent separation from actress Kate Hudson. The show begins at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday night at Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2004
Eats Great Sage, a new Clarksville restaurant from the owners of Roots Market, offers a menu of sophisticated vegetarian and vegan options. page 14 P I C K O F T H E W E E K What: Rich Robinson (co-founder and guitarist from the Black Crowes) When: Sunday; doors open at 7 p.m. Where: The Funk Box, 10 E. Cross St. Why: HeM-Fs promoting Paper, his first solo album. Find out for yourself how he does without the rest of the Crowes. Tickets: $12, available by calling the box office at 410-625-2000 or Ticketmaster at 410-547-SEAT.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 13, 2000
Jimmy Page & the Black Crowes Live at the Greek (TVT 2140) There was a time when any garage band worth its salt knew at least a couple Led Zeppelin songs - if not an entire album's worth. It wasn't just that Zeppelin was, in its prime, one of the most popular bands in the world, or that Zep's guitar, bass and drums lineup put the group's repertoire within reach of garage-band instrumentation. Led Zeppelin cranked out some of the most memorable riffs in heavy rock, and any band capable of covering "Whole Lotta Love," "The Lemon Song" or "Sick Again" was allowed - if only for a moment - to share in that glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 25, 1996
NasIt Was Written (Columbia 67015)There's nothing easy about listening to Nas. Between the brutal staccato of his delivery and his unflinching descriptions of street crime, his raps are hard enough to give "It Was Written" the same blood-splattered impact as the early gangsta rap recordings. But unlike O.G. rappers, Nas rarely glories in his own verbal aggression; instead, what comes across is a sort of killer cool, the flinty determination of a man with more sense of purpose than sense of humor.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 20, 1996
When the Black Crowes was planning its current mini-tour, the group didn't want to play the kind of halls it normally visited. "We're just trying to play alternative venues," says guitarist Rich Robinson, over the phone from a tour stop in Chicago. "Not alternative in the music sense, but alternative to what people normally play."Unfortunately, that search for "alternative venues" ended up forcing the Crowes to find an alternative to playing in Maryland. ,, Not only was a proposed show in Ocean City shot down by the city fathers, but attempts to play Baltimore's Pier Six fell through, too. It was enough to leave the band wondering what Maryland has against them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Morse and Steve Morse,The Boston Globe | March 31, 1995
Why worry? The latest Black Crowes record hasn't burned up the charts -- unlike the group's previous two -- but band members aren't ready to weep about it.The Crowes have reached a point where they're tired of being "a stooge to a record company," singer Chris Robinson says. They want to be judged for more than Top 40 success. They're looking for a community of fans, not for validation through the record industry and MTV.It's a radical view, but then, the Crowes have become a radical band.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 25, 1996
NasIt Was Written (Columbia 67015)There's nothing easy about listening to Nas. Between the brutal staccato of his delivery and his unflinching descriptions of street crime, his raps are hard enough to give "It Was Written" the same blood-splattered impact as the early gangsta rap recordings. But unlike O.G. rappers, Nas rarely glories in his own verbal aggression; instead, what comes across is a sort of killer cool, the flinty determination of a man with more sense of purpose than sense of humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | May 15, 1992
THE SOUTHERN HARMONY AND MUSICAL COMPANION(Def American 26916) When most rock acts talk about having "soul," they usually mean it in the spiritual, not musical, sense of the word. Not the Black Crowes, though. As "The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion" makes plain, this hard-rocking sextet is as at home with the funky grooves and gospel-style vocal harmony as it is with roaring guitars and arena-rock bravado. Of course, a lot of that has to do with singer Chris Robinson, who pumps enough passion into songs like "Remedy" or the bluesy "Time Will Tell" to make the music smolder and the listener sweat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | May 15, 1992
THE SOUTHERN HARMONY AND MUSICAL COMPANION(Def American 26916) When most rock acts talk about having "soul," they usually mean it in the spiritual, not musical, sense of the word. Not the Black Crowes, though. As "The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion" makes plain, this hard-rocking sextet is as at home with the funky grooves and gospel-style vocal harmony as it is with roaring guitars and arena-rock bravado. Of course, a lot of that has to do with singer Chris Robinson, who pumps enough passion into songs like "Remedy" or the bluesy "Time Will Tell" to make the music smolder and the listener sweat.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 14, 1991
ZZ Top may describe itself as "that little old band from Texas," but there was nothing small-scale about its performance at the Capital Centre last night.It wasn't enough that the band built its own personal auto graveyard on stage; there was also a working electromagnetic crane, a car compactor and perhaps the most pulchritudinous construction workers imaginable to make it all work.Yet, no matter how spectacular the effect, the staging never detracted from the central focus: the blues.From the classic slow grind "Jesus Left Chicago" to the modern abstractions of "My Head's in Mississippi," the group worked its way through almost every imaginable permutation of the blues.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.