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By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1996
Black members of the Baltimore City Council met secretly yesterday at a suburban hotel despite public outrage that their white colleagues were barred from attending the event.At least five of the 10 black council members and a handful of city officials, including Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III, attended the event at the Timonium Holiday Inn.The Hyatt Regency hotel downtown abruptly backed out as host Thursday. Holiday Inn officials said the council'sAfrican-American Coalition, which includes all 10 black members, told the hotel staff not to make it public that the group was there.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
CAMBRIDGE -- For civil rights leaders, last week's municipal election was a landmark in the often-troubled racial history of this Eastern Shore community of 11,000 -- a ballot box coup that for the first time brings a three-member African-American majority to the city council. Such an outcome might have seemed unimaginable in 1967 when National Guardsmen patrolled the streets and the heart of the city's black community was set ablaze. But many leaders, black and white, say the shift in political winds is just one element of a growing economic and cultural boom in the Choptank River town that for generations has been among the state's poorest.
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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
As a new Baltimore City Council takes office with a black majority for the first time in history, council members are hailing the change as a giant step toward better representation for African-Americans in a predominantly black city.But now, the question percolating in the background is whether this new council should signal the end of the African-American Coalition -- a group of black council members formed in 1988 to strengthen themselves in a largely white council.For the most part, the issue has divided the 19 council members into two camps:White members who believe the coalition should go but don't push the issue for fear of being labeled racist.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2002
James T. Smith Jr. took the oath of office as Baltimore County executive yesterday, promising a fiscally responsible government dedicated to improved education, revitalization of older communities and better communication with residents. The county's other elected officials also were sworn in at the ceremony, including Kenneth N. Oliver, the first African-American to win a seat on the County Council. Oliver's voice broke with emotion several times in his speech commemorating the milestone.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Patrick Gilbert and Thomas W. Waldron and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | June 28, 1991
A white Republican and a black Democrat have filed suit challenging the plan to redistrict the Baltimore City Council.The suit was filed yesterday in U.S. District Court by Ross Z. Pierpont, who has frequently run as a GOP candidate for various political offices, and Aaron Wilkes, 23, a college student. The suit contends that black voting strength is diluted by the redistricting plan and that it would illegally split up areas of the city linked by tradition or geography.The City Council approved the redistricting plan on March 22 after a week of emotional debate, tense negotiations and back-room deals.
NEWS
September 14, 1991
Years from now, Thursday's primary is likely to be seen as a watershed election in the city. Although only three of the 16 City Council incumbents seeking re-election were defeated, the political dynamics clearly have started to change.The days of old-time machine domination are over in the First District, where six-termer Dominic Mimi DiPietro and five-termer John A. Schaefer were soundly routed by rookies.Results in the Third District make it clear that a black council representative is an inevitability sooner rather than later, even though three white males managed to get elected this time.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
Public outrage over a blacks-only Baltimore City Council retreat planned for today caused a downtown hotel, originally the host site for the event, to abruptly back out yesterday.The Hyatt Regency near the Inner Harbor had agreed to provide a free meeting room for the two-day annual retreat, but hotel officials canceled when calls from city residents criticized the hotel."I think that was a good idea," said white 2nd District Councilman Anthony J. Ambridge, a critic of the council's African-American Coalition members who organized the retreat.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbertand Michael A. Fletcher and Patrick Gilbertand Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | January 7, 1991
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is considering only a few changes to the existing lines of Baltimore's six councilmanic districts as he prepares his redistricting plan.This is the message the mayor delivered to the City Council during weekend meetings with individual council members.Schmoke indicated that the city's population loss over the past 10 years was evenly distributed around the six districts and that population shifts made the racial balance in every district "generally acceptable," several council members said.
NEWS
By PATRICK GILBERT | July 21, 1991
Shortly after the voting polls close in this year's councilmanic elections in Baltimore, someone in the city's black community is going to stand up and say ''I told you so.''Back in March during the debates over councilmanic redistricting, a lot of brash predictions were made as to what a new redistricting plan would mean to the outcome of the election.The plan -- designed primarily by Councilman Carl Stokes, D-2nd -- increased the number of districts that have a black majority population from three to five, leaving only one majority-white district.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | April 3, 1991
THE CITY COUNCIL representatives from the 3rd and 6th districts who've been whipped into high dudgeon by Councilman Carl Stokes' redistricting plan need to be reminded of one thing: There are no black council members from the 1st, 3rd or 6th districts.In all the ruckus over redistricting, it's odd that few of the participants -- not even black council members -- mentioned this fact. To hear the injured parties from the northeast and south tell it, this is what happened the past three weeks:The city of Baltimore, a veritable paradise of racial harmony and understanding with equitably drawn councilmanic districts, was rendered asunder by black council members who rammed an unfair and racist redistricting plan down the city's gullet.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
YORK, Pa. - In an Election Day drama he compared to refereeing the final seconds of a college basketball championship, two-term mayor Charlie Robertson squeaked by his opponent in one of the most closely watched mayoral primary elections in this southern Pennsylvania town's history. Veteran City Councilman Ray Crenshaw conceded defeat after coming up about 100 votes short, according to unofficial results. He said he would not seek a recount. Robertson overcame speculation that he played a greater role than he has admitted in the riot-era killing of a black preacher's 27-year-old daughter.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1996
Black members of the Baltimore City Council met secretly yesterday at a suburban hotel despite public outrage that their white colleagues were barred from attending the event.At least five of the 10 black council members and a handful of city officials, including Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III, attended the event at the Timonium Holiday Inn.The Hyatt Regency hotel downtown abruptly backed out as host Thursday. Holiday Inn officials said the council'sAfrican-American Coalition, which includes all 10 black members, told the hotel staff not to make it public that the group was there.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
Public outrage over a blacks-only Baltimore City Council retreat planned for today caused a downtown hotel, originally the host site for the event, to abruptly back out yesterday.The Hyatt Regency near the Inner Harbor had agreed to provide a free meeting room for the two-day annual retreat, but hotel officials canceled when calls from city residents criticized the hotel."I think that was a good idea," said white 2nd District Councilman Anthony J. Ambridge, a critic of the council's African-American Coalition members who organized the retreat.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
A growing racial rift within the Baltimore City Council over a planned blacks-only retreat tomorrow and Saturday may turn into a legal feud that could pit some white members against their black colleagues.At issue is whether the 10 black council members -- enough to pass legislation in the 19-member panel -- are breaking public meeting laws that require meetings to be open to the public when a majority is present and any business is discussed.The conflict also is about hurt feelings and power.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
As a new Baltimore City Council takes office with a black majority for the first time in history, council members are hailing the change as a giant step toward better representation for African-Americans in a predominantly black city.But now, the question percolating in the background is whether this new council should signal the end of the African-American Coalition -- a group of black council members formed in 1988 to strengthen themselves in a largely white council.For the most part, the issue has divided the 19 council members into two camps:White members who believe the coalition should go but don't push the issue for fear of being labeled racist.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
As a new Baltimore City Council takes office with a black majority for the first time in history, council members are hailing the change as a giant step toward better representation for African-Americans in a predominantly black city.But now, the question percolating in the background is whether this new council should signal the end of the African-American Coalition -- a group of black council members formed in 1988 to strengthen themselves in a largely white council.For the most part, the issue has divided the 19 council members into two camps:White members who believe the coalition should go but don't push the issue for fear of being labeled racist.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | March 20, 1991
Susan Taylor was in her Locust Point home tucking her two young daughters into bed when the phone rang."It was a friend," Taylor said yesterday, swinging her TOGOM (That Old Gang of Mine) club jacket over her shoulder as her daughters played in the City Council chambers. "She said, 'They are moving our council district. Let's get a bus and go up there and protest.' "Taylor, whose family has lived in the South Baltimore neighborhood for three generations, said the redistricting plan is serious business in Locust Point.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
A growing racial rift within the Baltimore City Council over a planned blacks-only retreat tomorrow and Saturday may turn into a legal feud that could pit some white members against their black colleagues.At issue is whether the 10 black council members -- enough to pass legislation in the 19-member panel -- are breaking public meeting laws that require meetings to be open to the public when a majority is present and any business is discussed.The conflict also is about hurt feelings and power.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
In an effort to combat the sense of hopelessness that grips Baltimore's poorest residents, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and black members of the City Council have set an empowerment conference at which participants will learn about self-help efforts.At the Conference on Community Empowerment, scheduled for June 11 at Poly-Western Auditorium, community activists will attend workshops in which they will learn about self-help programs and organizing strategies that are being used in other cities.Members of the council's African-American Coalition said they hope the conference leads to the formation of a community-financed loan fund for black businesses -- an idea pushed by Councilwoman Sheila Dixon, a 4th District Democrat.
NEWS
September 14, 1991
Years from now, Thursday's primary is likely to be seen as a watershed election in the city. Although only three of the 16 City Council incumbents seeking re-election were defeated, the political dynamics clearly have started to change.The days of old-time machine domination are over in the First District, where six-termer Dominic Mimi DiPietro and five-termer John A. Schaefer were soundly routed by rookies.Results in the Third District make it clear that a black council representative is an inevitability sooner rather than later, even though three white males managed to get elected this time.
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