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By Gregory Kane | April 12, 1997
Those of us still addicted to reading have much to choose from, much to pique our interest, stimulate our intellects and arouse our indignation. Here are just a couple of things for us bibliophiles to be thankful for.The April and May editions of Headway magazine, which is fast becoming the leading forum for minority conservative thought. The April issue features the always delightful Walter Williams, a black conservative syndicated columnist who loves tweaking liberal noses.In an exquisite piece lampooning the tendency of all too many Americans to freeload, Williams asks the question no doubt driving taxpayers throughout the country downright loony.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 7, 2011
Do you think it gives Clarence Thomas a warm, fuzzy feeling to know he is one of Ann Coulter's blacks? That is how Coulter put it on Fox "News" while defending Herman Cain against sexual harassment charges that threatened to engulf his campaign last week. "Liberals," she said, detest black conservatives, but the truth is, "our blacks are so much better than their blacks. " "Our" blacks? Really? Social conservative pundits tend to be astonishingly obtuse when discussing race (see Exhibit A, above)
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NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A group of black conservatives and the predominantly liberal Congressional Black Caucus confronted each other yesterday in the opening round of what promises to be a head-to-head fight over the fitness of Judge Clarence Thomas to sit as a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.The pro-Thomas conservatives and the anti-Thomas caucus held news conferences at which each claimed to speak for the national black community on the issue of whether President Bush's nominee, a judge in the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, should be confirmed for the Supreme Court by the Senate.
NEWS
By Marjorie Valbrun | February 5, 2005
IN HIS State of the Union speech, President Bush talked about "bringing hope to harsh places," and giving "young men in our cities better options than apathy, or gangs, or jail," calling to mind certain rough neighborhoods populated by people of color. "We need to make sure Americans of all races and backgrounds have confidence in the system that provides justice," he said, addressing a longstanding concern of black Americans about the disproportionate rates of black men in U.S. prisons and on death row. And in a nod to black ministers who have enthusiastically signed on to his faith-based initiatives, the president said he had a three-year plan to develop "a broader outreach to at-risk youth which involves parents and pastors."
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Rap music producer Bill Stephney told a gathering of black conservatives and clergy yesterday that "it probably seems rather strange that the likes of me is addressing you."The 34-year-old co-founder of the rap group Public Enemy told the Black Conservative Unity Summit that he came because he was fed up with what's happening to the black family.With video clips from newscasts, he clicked off the evidence: single mothers who stabbed, beat or poisoned their children.Those tragedies are an urgent call to return to morality, Stephney said, laying out the central theme of the Howard University gathering of about 60 black conservatives who want to infuse a new way of approaching problems among African-Americans.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- J. Kenneth Blackwell likens big government to the Mad Hatter's tea party: as guests make a mess at one place setting, they move down to the next one, never cleaning up the messes they leave behind.Mr. Blackwell, the treasurer of the state of Ohio, is a conservative Republican, a critic of big government and a champion of family, work, education, faith and freedom. He is also black."Limited government is conservative, and I believe that because of my parents, Dana and Joyce Blackwell, not because of Pat Buchanan or Phyllis Schlafly," Mr. Blackwell said.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 12, 1994
The Allies' chief achievement in Yugoslavia has been to avoid repeating World War I, though how much longer is a question mark.Rwanda is the one in anarchy, Burundi the one that's serene, this week.The NAACP is right to seek dialogue with black nationalists and should seek dialogue with black conservatives next.Cheer up. The Maryland General Assembly has finished its work.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | July 19, 1991
No matter how sharply they've spied,Our satellites can't seem to guideThe U.N. to uranium* Or see through the craniumOf Baghdad's berserk Mister Hide.Though not on a lengthening list,White liberals still will insistAs they make Thomas squirm$ Before they confirm:Black conservatives shouldn't exist.Since '80, suspicions increaseAbout delayed hostage release;Did the GOP con! Iran to help Ron?No indeedy, swears lawyer Ed Meese.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | November 20, 2004
BILL COSBY'S Wednesday visit to Baltimore did nothing for me but bring back a bad memory, one only a week old. None of this was Cosby's fault, mind you. My experience occurred in Cambridge, Mass., during my three days at a liberal re-education camp. You know it better as the college formerly called Harvard University. OK, so I'm kidding. A little. I spent three days in Cambridge, where members of the Trotter Group, an organization of black columnists, held their annual meeting. There were several symposiums held with liberal cognoscenti in the Charles Hotel and at several places on the Harvard campus.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 17, 2000
HERE'S HOW the life of a black conservative goes in America as the year 2000 draws to a close. You've been called every name in the book - Uncle Tom, sellout, traitor, house Negro, handkerchief-head. You're constantly told that you only parrot the line of white conservatives, as if black liberals don't parrot the lines of white liberals, displaying such blind obedience that they banned black author James Baldwin from speaking at the March on Washington in 1963. You're constantly told that your views don't represent those of African-Americans, as if all blacks in America are somehow obligated to think alike, as if we're not members of a vibrant, vital and contributing ethnic group but part of a herd.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Richard Simon and Peter Wallsten and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Race became a significant factor in the debate over Social Security yesterday when President Bush told black leaders that the government retirement program shortchanged blacks, whose relatively shorter lifespan meant they paid more in payroll taxes than they eventually received in benefits. Bush's comments came during a private White House meeting with 22 black religious and business leaders who backed his re-election last year - marking a new line of argument in the president's attempts to win support for adding worker-owned investment accounts to Social Security.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | November 20, 2004
BILL COSBY'S Wednesday visit to Baltimore did nothing for me but bring back a bad memory, one only a week old. None of this was Cosby's fault, mind you. My experience occurred in Cambridge, Mass., during my three days at a liberal re-education camp. You know it better as the college formerly called Harvard University. OK, so I'm kidding. A little. I spent three days in Cambridge, where members of the Trotter Group, an organization of black columnists, held their annual meeting. There were several symposiums held with liberal cognoscenti in the Charles Hotel and at several places on the Harvard campus.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 29, 2004
THE NEXT time a group of black folks invites somebody with the last name of Cosby to speak anywhere, you can be sure it'll be Camille Cosby, not her husband, Bill. A few years back, after the Cosbys' only son, Ennis, was killed by a Russian immigrant who had racist attitudes toward black people, Camille Cosby published an op-ed piece blaming whites. It was white America, Camille Cosby wrote, who taught her son's killer to hate blacks. She even drew a connection to President Ulysses S. Grant's picture on the $50 bill and his ownership of two slaves - who became his legal property after he married his wife - to the gunman pulling the trigger.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 9, 2003
DALLAS - Those at the National Association of Black Journalists who stood and gave National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice a standing ovation Thursday were few and far between in the Landmark Ballroom of this city's downtown Hyatt Regency Hotel. Rice strode into the ballroom after Gwen Ifill of PBS introduced her. There were no boos, catcalls or jeers as the audience applauded, but there wasn't the thunderous, almost unanimous standing ovation given another NABJ speaker seven years ago. It was in 1996 that Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan spoke at the NABJ convention in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 17, 2000
HERE'S HOW the life of a black conservative goes in America as the year 2000 draws to a close. You've been called every name in the book - Uncle Tom, sellout, traitor, house Negro, handkerchief-head. You're constantly told that you only parrot the line of white conservatives, as if black liberals don't parrot the lines of white liberals, displaying such blind obedience that they banned black author James Baldwin from speaking at the March on Washington in 1963. You're constantly told that your views don't represent those of African-Americans, as if all blacks in America are somehow obligated to think alike, as if we're not members of a vibrant, vital and contributing ethnic group but part of a herd.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 29, 1997
It was about 11:40 a.m. Monday when I walked out to my car. As I was about to put the key in the lock, I noticed the concrete brick on my driver's seat.Shards of glass surrounded the brick and covered the front passenger seat. The glove compartment was opened, its contents on the passenger's seat. The passenger-side window was gone.I didn't get upset. I couldn't. Losing two sisters and a brother in less than 16 months tends to make me keep my cool when far less serious things happen. Instead I muttered to myself, showing scarcely a trace of emotion, "This is not how I left this car."
NEWS
By Clarence Lusane | May 12, 1995
THE ENTRANCE of black conservative and former Reagan administration official Alan Keyes of Maryland in the chase for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination may lead some to believe that an African-American perspective will be represented the coming GOP debates. Don't count on it.Alan Keyes' entrance also doesn't reflect a new and enlightened Republican view of racial tolerance. Mr. Keyes and other contemporary black conservatives often take positions that even white conservatives dare not take.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 29, 2004
THE NEXT time a group of black folks invites somebody with the last name of Cosby to speak anywhere, you can be sure it'll be Camille Cosby, not her husband, Bill. A few years back, after the Cosbys' only son, Ennis, was killed by a Russian immigrant who had racist attitudes toward black people, Camille Cosby published an op-ed piece blaming whites. It was white America, Camille Cosby wrote, who taught her son's killer to hate blacks. She even drew a connection to President Ulysses S. Grant's picture on the $50 bill and his ownership of two slaves - who became his legal property after he married his wife - to the gunman pulling the trigger.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Rap music producer Bill Stephney told a gathering of black conservatives and clergy yesterday that "it probably seems rather strange that the likes of me is addressing you."The 34-year-old co-founder of the rap group Public Enemy told the Black Conservative Unity Summit that he came because he was fed up with what's happening to the black family.With video clips from newscasts, he clicked off the evidence: single mothers who stabbed, beat or poisoned their children.Those tragedies are an urgent call to return to morality, Stephney said, laying out the central theme of the Howard University gathering of about 60 black conservatives who want to infuse a new way of approaching problems among African-Americans.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | April 12, 1997
Those of us still addicted to reading have much to choose from, much to pique our interest, stimulate our intellects and arouse our indignation. Here are just a couple of things for us bibliophiles to be thankful for.The April and May editions of Headway magazine, which is fast becoming the leading forum for minority conservative thought. The April issue features the always delightful Walter Williams, a black conservative syndicated columnist who loves tweaking liberal noses.In an exquisite piece lampooning the tendency of all too many Americans to freeload, Williams asks the question no doubt driving taxpayers throughout the country downright loony.
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