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NEWS
November 22, 2009
I think it is silly and unfair to say that the black community is more "heterosexist" (a term I prefer) than white communities. Blacks are not the major voting bloc in any state, and we do not make up a majority in any state or national legislative body in this country. The legal oppression of gays does not come from the black community - we are 14 percent of the population. I don't know of any ethnic community in America that does not stigmatize gays. I went to a majority college and have always worked for companies mostly comprised of whites, and anti-gay slurs are common.
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NEWS
August 27, 2014
I am a bit embarrassed that the African-American leaders of Ferguson, Mo. chose the Rev. Al Sharpton as their "national voice" for the community. Or perhaps I got that wrong. The truth may be that Reverend Sharpton foisted himself upon the community ( "Rioting requires police response," Aug. 21). I believe Mr. Sharpton is nothing more than a heat-seeking opportunist whose agenda is more about him greedily grabbing face time on TV. The Tawana Brawley incident occurred approximately three decades ago. With that singular incident, I believe Mr. Sharpton lost credibility among many people who were not African-American.
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NEWS
November 22, 2009
This letter is in memory of Jason Mattison Jr., an openly gay, African-American Baltimore high school student who was raped and murdered this month ("Mystery cloaks death of teen who 'had a life ahead of him,'" Nov. 18). It may be hard for some people to admit that, while racial inequities still exist so obviously in our city and women on average still do not get paid as much as men, the fact is that the current arena of the civil rights struggle in our country is the fight for equal rights for homosexuals.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
On Sunday night, Walmart aired a commercial promoting watermelon during the BET Awards, one of the most popular TV programs among African-American households. The commercial features a grower who says "summertime is watermelon time. " The farmer extols the virtues of tending his crop and also of his relationship with Walmart, which offers a money-back guarantee that its watermelon will be fresh. With the Fourth of July right around the corner, consumption of the luscious red fruit is reaching its peak.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 24, 1993
Even as a rookie teacher, Andrew Billingsley knew there was something wrong with his textbooks. Here he was in 1964, teaching a class on the family to budding social workers at the University of California-Berkeley, and there was nothing about the black family."
NEWS
By Jennifer M. Sims and Jennifer M. Sims,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 2003
Developing and nurturing a unified black community in Anne Arundel County was the driving theme of the first convention of African-American leaders here in 30 years. The African American Leadership Summit, held yesterday in Severna Park, attracted more than 100 people. They spent the day listening to speakers and joining in panel discussions that addressed a breadth of topics from violence in the media to resources for minority businesses to public school lunches. The goal of the summit was to develop an African-American agenda in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
At New Shiloh Baptist Church in Baltimore, dozens of African-American ministers applauded as the speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates assailed the impact slot machines would have on the state's poor and working-class communities. "The idea of putting slots in communities where there is the least resistance ought not to be tolerated," said Michael E. Busch, an Anne Arundel County Democrat, who, judging from the enthusiastic response, was clearly speaking to the choir. But a few miles away, a leader of one such community was singing a different tune: "Without slots, we got nothing," said Jean Yarborough, who lives near Pimlico Race Course.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | October 30, 2006
FREDERICK -- Thomas Hill never wanted to leave West All Saints Street. He was born and raised on the byway when it was the thriving commercial and cultural hub of the black community, and it is where, for 13 years, he operated a three-chair barbershop. But a developer purchased the building where Hill cut hair to convert it to condominiums, and Hill couldn't afford the rent increase. So Hill, whom everyone knows as "Frosty," took his old-fashioned barber chairs and boxing photographs and moved into a nondescript office building a short drive away.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 25, 2013
President Barack Obama gave two commencement addresses in one to graduates of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga., last weekend. It would be easy for this conservative to critique the political and social elements of his speech. Instead, I choose to focus on the inspirational part. The president struck the right note at the historically black, all-male college. African-American men in America need more role models and encouragement to counter the reality, reinforced by much of the media, of too much failure, crime, imprisonment, out-of-wedlock births, a disproportionate abortion rate and other social maladies affecting many in the black community.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
Shirley Kane didn't think she could take it any more. Her 87-year-old mother, diagnosed with terminal cancer, was bedridden at home. Kane was the only person feeding her, sorting out her medications, keeping her clean. The job was so overwhelming that she abandoned her own activities, forsook her own health needs and sank into depression. "They say the caregiver goes first," Kane says. "I almost felt like I didn't want to live anymore. " Then the 64-year-old did something studies show is exceptional among her fellow African-Americans.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Baltimore police plan to deploy officers around city schools until the school year ends to ensure student safety amid recent racial tensions, while school officials joined civil rights leaders to urge students of different races to peacefully resolve differences. The actions followed recent threats and violent attacks on Latino students as well as the Memorial Day robbery and murder of a 15-year-old Mexican student who had dropped out of high school to help his family. Black and Hispanic leaders called for peace at a news conference Monday afternoon, before police deployed several officers to Federal Hill near Digital Harbor High School to deter groups of students from fighting in the streets.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Michelle Pearce and her twin sister, Sandie Pearce Reardon, wanted to try something new when they walked into Haute Blow Dry Bar in Harbor East. They were so pleased with the results - long chestnut locks - that they posted photos that afternoon of their new hairdos to Facebook. "We love it," Pearce, who lives in Federal Hill, said about the new salon. "It took [the stylist] about 20 minutes. " So-called "blow-dry bars" have been popping up in Baltimore and around the country.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
Shirley Kane didn't think she could take it any more. Her 87-year-old mother, diagnosed with terminal cancer, was bedridden at home. Kane was the only person feeding her, sorting out her medications, keeping her clean. The job was so overwhelming that she abandoned her own activities, forsook her own health needs and sank into depression. "They say the caregiver goes first," Kane says. "I almost felt like I didn't want to live anymore. " Then the 64-year-old did something studies show is exceptional among her fellow African-Americans.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Revered as a "gentleman in the finest sense of the word, remarkable convert-maker and a friend of the benighted," the Rev. Vincent Warren drove into rural Virginia one September night to share the word of God. He had no idea of what awaited. A caravan of cars overtook his own. Hooded men in white robes forced him into one of their cars and drove off. They interrogated the cleric at gunpoint - "What are you doing in the area? Are you going to start a church?" - before releasing him hours later.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Two LGBT-focused films screening at the Creative Alliance over the next two weeks provide deeper looks at often-marginalized parts of the queer community -- with one exploring Maryland in particular. On Thursday night, director Tina Gharavi's " I Am Nasrine " is located at the intersection of immigration and sexuality, providing a look at what it means to struggle with both one's national identity and sexual orientation. The movie, part of which was filmed clandestinely in Iran, follows the stories of siblings Nasrine and Ali as they leave Iran to start new lives in the U.K. As the pair get their bearings in a foreign nation whose attitude toward immigrants is often, uh, less-than-enlightened, Ali also grapples with his emerging sexuality.
NEWS
August 2, 2013
I advocate for a boycott of rapper and record producer Jay-Z and his wife, Beyonce, for their irresponsible impact on modern culture. Jay-Z's music is violent, racist and reinforces an attitude of aggression and victimization to the black community. His ill-considered reactions to the George Zimmerman verdict are obvious evidence that he does not deserve his public position of influence. In my opinion both he and his wife practice a subtle form of racism - happy to take the money of white people but advocating in their music and comments that white people are inherently racist and dangerous to the black community.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1997
When WANN-AM in Annapolis went on the air in January 1947, it was greeted with "cheers, tears and jeers," founder Morris H. Blum recalled.The tears flowed from his wife. The cheers came from his friends and supporters. The jeers were from people who said the station -- the first in Annapolis -- would never survive.Fifty years later, Blum has proved the skeptics wrong. Not only has the station -- the first in Maryland to hire African-American on-air personalities -- survived, albeit with some changes, but it also has become the voice of the black community in the region, listeners say.Tonight, the Annapolis city council will award Blum a mayoral proclamation recognizing his five decades as a pioneer of civil rights and a model of civic responsibility.
NEWS
August 2, 2013
I advocate for a boycott of rapper and record producer Jay-Z and his wife, Beyonce, for their irresponsible impact on modern culture. Jay-Z's music is violent, racist and reinforces an attitude of aggression and victimization to the black community. His ill-considered reactions to the George Zimmerman verdict are obvious evidence that he does not deserve his public position of influence. In my opinion both he and his wife practice a subtle form of racism - happy to take the money of white people but advocating in their music and comments that white people are inherently racist and dangerous to the black community.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
It's very true that a gun-carrying white man profiled a young black man and the end result is the young black man is dead ("No justice," July 16). The criminal case is over and the federal civil rights case is on the way. We should all ask, what if? What if all of the facts held true but George Zimmerman had been an adult black man profiling a young black man? What if a black George Zimmerman was getting his head kicked in by Trayvon Martin and a black George Zimmerman pulled the trigger.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 25, 2013
President Barack Obama gave two commencement addresses in one to graduates of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga., last weekend. It would be easy for this conservative to critique the political and social elements of his speech. Instead, I choose to focus on the inspirational part. The president struck the right note at the historically black, all-male college. African-American men in America need more role models and encouragement to counter the reality, reinforced by much of the media, of too much failure, crime, imprisonment, out-of-wedlock births, a disproportionate abortion rate and other social maladies affecting many in the black community.
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