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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
A federal judge ruled Monday that Maryland hasn't done enough to help the state's four historically black colleges and universities overcome segregation-era policies that required separate programs for white and black students. In the ruling, U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake found that state universities have continued to unnecessarily duplicate the programs of the four historically black institutions, violating the constitutional rights of those students. Plaintiffs had argued that the historically black colleges were hurt because neighboring institutions offered similar programs, siphoning away students.
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NEWS
By John L. Hudgins | June 2, 2014
As the nation moves toward President Obama's goal of college degrees for 60 percent of Americans by 2020, the role of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) becomes even more important - particularly in Maryland, where 48 percent of African American students attend one of four HBCUs, compared with 16 percent nationwide. A college degree is more important than ever, with the pay gap between college graduates and non-graduates reaching a record high last year. According to a Washington Post report, graduates earned on average nearly double the hourly rate of non-graduates.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
Maryland's four historically black colleges and universities are more segregated today than in decades past because of discriminatory practices and policies maintained by the state's Higher Education Commission, lawyers told a federal court judge Wednesday. "The result is [that the four colleges] fall farther and farther behind," said John Greenbaum, a civil rights attorney representing an advocacy group that sued the commission. The lawsuit, originally filed in 2006 and since amended four times, contends that the state underfunds black schools, particularly in capital improvement projects, and allows unnecessary duplication of programs by surrounding institutions.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
A proposal for Morgan State University to offer joint academic programs with Towson University is drawing objections from some Morgan officials who believe such a setup would benefit Towson far more than the Baltimore institution. The plan, which is in the early stages, emerged just months after a judge ordered the state and the state's four historically black colleges, including Morgan, into mediation to settle alleged disparities in funding and duplication of programs at historically black institutions by other state colleges and universities.
NEWS
By George La Noue | October 27, 2013
U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Blake issued a long awaited, 60-page ruling this month in the case Coalition for Educational Equity and Excellence v. Maryland Higher Education Commission. The litigation was brought by supporters of Maryland's historically black institutions (HBIs), Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The plaintiffs argued that the state of Maryland had failed in its obligation under the 14th Amendment's Equal Protection Clause to desegregate its higher education system.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Morgan State University is trying to raise $300,000 in donations by the end of the month to give 300 undergraduates emergency scholarships — the result of tighter lending standards that have hit historically black colleges and universities particularly hard. The universities blame changes to the Parent PLUS Loans, which allow holders to borrow the full cost of tuition, fees and living expenses. More loans were denied after credit history requirements were made stricter in late 2011.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | November 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, after an emotional speech about inner-city children preoccupied with death, yesterday signed an executive order designed to channel federal money and expertise to historically black colleges and universities."
NEWS
By Joe Pettit | January 21, 2008
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., whose birthday we celebrate today, moved a nation to confront the legacy of slavery, the consequences of legalized segregation and the devastation of racial inequality - including educational inequality. His abiding legacy provides a challenging context for the recent debate over the proper role of historically black colleges and universities in American higher education. Some argue that historically black colleges and universities are unnecessary and ineffective.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON and GARLAND L. THOMPSON,Garland L. Thompson writes editorials for The Sun | November 16, 1991
Arguments in a recent Supreme Court hearing on a Mississippi lawsuit echo the debate over Maryland's historically black colleges. U.S. v. Mabus was originally begun in 1975 by Jake Ayers of Glen Allen, Mississippi, whose children wanted to attend mostly black Mississippi Valley State, but found the school woefully under-supported. As his lawyer said: ''Jake Ayers decided, 'if I'm a taxpayer in the state of Mississippi, why aren't black institutions getting equal resources?' ''Good question.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to harness the purchasing power of the nation's 30 million African-Americans, a Baltimore group announced yesterday that it is teaming up with Key Federal Savings Bank and American Express to provide millions of dollars for black colleges.The organization, America's Black Colleges, is promoting a Visa credit card issued by the Havre de Grace bank that will contribute a small percentage of each transaction to a fund providing scholarships and awards to 115 historically black schools, including five in Maryland.
NEWS
By George La Noue | October 27, 2013
U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Blake issued a long awaited, 60-page ruling this month in the case Coalition for Educational Equity and Excellence v. Maryland Higher Education Commission. The litigation was brought by supporters of Maryland's historically black institutions (HBIs), Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The plaintiffs argued that the state of Maryland had failed in its obligation under the 14th Amendment's Equal Protection Clause to desegregate its higher education system.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
A federal judge ruled Monday that Maryland hasn't done enough to help the state's four historically black colleges and universities overcome segregation-era policies that required separate programs for white and black students. In the ruling, U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake found that state universities have continued to unnecessarily duplicate the programs of the four historically black institutions, violating the constitutional rights of those students. Plaintiffs had argued that the historically black colleges were hurt because neighboring institutions offered similar programs, siphoning away students.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Morgan State University is trying to raise $300,000 in donations by the end of the month to give 300 undergraduates emergency scholarships — the result of tighter lending standards that have hit historically black colleges and universities particularly hard. The universities blame changes to the Parent PLUS Loans, which allow holders to borrow the full cost of tuition, fees and living expenses. More loans were denied after credit history requirements were made stricter in late 2011.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
I have had long-standing empathetic connections to the issues raised by your recent article on the civil rights protests in Baltimore ("Former student protesters remember civil rights battle over the Northwood Theatre," Feb. 16). The experience of Baltimore college students in 1963 closely followed my own experiences in Greensboro, N.C., when students at the black colleges there began protesting racial segregation at the local Woolworth's lunch counter. As a Southern white woman, I had always been confounded by the restrictions in my hometown of Wilmington, N.C., where as a child I observed the signs over water fountains, outside restrooms and on public buses restricting blacks from using facilities designated for whites.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Hundreds of students and supporters of Maryland's historically black colleges and universities rallied Monday in Annapolis to press for increased state funding to make up for decades of discrimination. The presidents of Morgan State University, Coppin State University, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore joined civil rights leaders and several politicians in front of the State House to call on Gov. Martin O'Malley to settle a lawsuit alleging the schools have been underfunded at least since the 1930s.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | January 31, 2013
On Capitol Hill, in African-American churches and at historically black colleges and universities, people are talking about a documentary film that challenges negative reports and statistics regarding blacks, especially black men. "Hoodwinked," produced by former Laurel resident Janks Morton, debuted in fall 2012 during the Congressional Black Caucus' annual legislative weekend, and is now being shown at special screenings around the country....
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to harness the purchasing power of the nation's 30 million African-Americans, a Baltimore group announced yesterday that it is teaming up with Key Federal Savings Bank and American Express to provide millions of dollars for black colleges.The organization, America's Black Colleges, is promoting a Visa credit card issued by the Havre de Grace bank that will contribute a small percentage of each transaction to a fund providing scholarships and awards to 115 historically black schools, including five colleges in Maryland.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2013
A Morgan State University alumnus who is leading a coalition suing the state over discrimination at historically black colleges and universities has criticized the university's embattled president for showing "minimal interest and involvement in the lawsuit. " David J. Burton, president of the Coalition for Equity and Excellence in Maryland Higher Education, wrote in a letter to Dallas R. Evans, chair of Morgan's Board of Regents, saying university president David J. Wilson's actions could "be interpreted as his being against rather than in support of the Coalition's case.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | November 7, 2012
Football Ex-Raven Sharpe to Black College HOF The Black College Football Hall of Fame announced Tuesday that former Ravens tight end Shannon Sharpe has been selected for induction next year along with 10 others. The inductees will be honored Feb. 16 at the Loews Hotel in Atlanta. NFL Network's Charles Davis will serve as master of ceremonies. Before going on to win two Super Bowls with the Denver Broncos and one with the Ravens in 2001, Sharpe was a three-time All-Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference selection at Savannah State from 1987 to 1989 and the SIAC Player of the Year in 1987.
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