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NEWS
By Knight Ridder News Service | March 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Every school day in the United States, more than 3,000 black students are suspended from public school, more than 500 black students drop out. Every day, more than 800 black teen-age girls become pregnant, approximately 126 black youths are arrested for violent crime, 34 black infants die, five black children are murdered, one black child commits suicide.Such shocking statistics have propelled more than 100 leading black child advocates, community activists and religious leaders from around the country to unite in an effort to rescue black children.
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NEWS
July 25, 2013
Something is terribly wrong with our system when three elderly peace activists enter a nuclear weapons site in Tennessee, spray paint anti-war slogans and pour blood on the walls as an act of non-violent civil disobedience and are found guilty of two felonies (threat to national security and trespassing), and now face up to 35 years in prison. Meanwhile George Zimmerman kills an unarmed child with the claim of self-defense and he is acquitted ("Zimmerman verdict wasn't about race," July 23)
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NEWS
By Cynthia Chideya | May 6, 1993
I WANT to share with Other Voices readers the work of my sixth graders at West Baltimore Middle School. When we began studying health during the second semester, we talked about how important it is to have and cultivate a good self-image. My students reflected on what it takes to be mentally healthy and strong, and one day for a homework assignment I asked them to write poems about themselves. What I got back was marvelous, much of it heartfelt and well-written.These children are regular students, some more academically adept that others.
NEWS
October 21, 2007
Dear David: I spoke to Tracey the other day. You know Tracey. She's the mother of your daughter, and the woman who probably would have married you, if you hadn't made so many bad choices over the last decade and spent so much time in prison. How is prison, anyway? I hear you're back inside one. I assume you'll read this today or one day this week, and maybe you and the other guys in Maryland's correctional facilities will take some time to reflect on what Tracey has to say. I'm not revealing your full name because, while I have Tracey's permission, I don't have yours, and because, in many respects it doesn't matter.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
Something is terribly wrong with our system when three elderly peace activists enter a nuclear weapons site in Tennessee, spray paint anti-war slogans and pour blood on the walls as an act of non-violent civil disobedience and are found guilty of two felonies (threat to national security and trespassing), and now face up to 35 years in prison. Meanwhile George Zimmerman kills an unarmed child with the claim of self-defense and he is acquitted ("Zimmerman verdict wasn't about race," July 23)
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | October 22, 2006
The figures, or maybe misery is a better word, like so much else about black Africa, are almost beyond belief. More than 12 million children have lost one parent or are orphans. And given the HIV-AIDS pandemic, warfare and poverty that plague many African nations, the number of orphans or near-orphans will soar to nearly 20 million by 2010. The worst part is that apart from a string of bulging, cramped, desperately underfunded and in many cases unsafe orphanages in Sub-Saharan Africa, many of these children are doomed to live out their youth in a caretaker existence.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 2, 1991
"The People Under the Stairs" is your average comedy about child abuse, mutilation and murder. It's a yecch! a minute.Written and directed by Wes Craven in strokes so broad he could have used lipstick on a mirror, it plays off archetypal fears of dark places in old houses. In the sense that it tries to be primal, it is sometimes effective; in the sense that it tries to be entertaining, it's complete drivel.It might also be regarded as Universal's pre-emptive strike on Paramount's upcoming "The Addams Family," because the comic-macabre elements seem of a piece with the same broad tone in the Paramount film.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | September 10, 1991
New York -- ON 42ND STREET someone had pasted a poster to a wall. "The Real Last Supper," it said, beneath a standard rendering of Christ and his apostles seated round a table, except that all of them were black.Down at the corner, a man in African garb was speechifying, spouting a spiel about a conspiracy between Catholics and Jews to maintain the slave trade.He sounded like Leonard Jeffries, the City College professor who's gotten so much press lately for his views about the innate superiority of black people.
NEWS
By RICHARD RODRIGUEZ | July 21, 1995
San Francisco. -- President Clinton is a Southerner. That fact alone may explain why, given the opportunity to rethink the logic and effect of affirmative action, he failed. In his speech this week at the National Archives before a largely black audience, the president floated old platitudes.On the other hand, several weeks ago, I was talking to a roomful of black teen-agers, most of them street kids or kids from the projects. Only one of them in a room of 13 had ever heard of anything called affirmative action.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS Jr | March 24, 1995
Miami -- Sitting in the darkness of the multiplex, I watched the white social worker and the black recovering addict battle over the black child they both call their son. I watched ''Losing Isaiah'' and, in the subtext of its nearly flawless script, heard the questions I would have asked:''You say you want to raise this black child, white lady?''What about those things he needs to know that you can't teach? Things you won't find in a book. He needs to know that the nappy hair at the nape of the neck is called the kitchen.
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | October 22, 2006
The figures, or maybe misery is a better word, like so much else about black Africa, are almost beyond belief. More than 12 million children have lost one parent or are orphans. And given the HIV-AIDS pandemic, warfare and poverty that plague many African nations, the number of orphans or near-orphans will soar to nearly 20 million by 2010. The worst part is that apart from a string of bulging, cramped, desperately underfunded and in many cases unsafe orphanages in Sub-Saharan Africa, many of these children are doomed to live out their youth in a caretaker existence.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 24, 1996
Purity, rare enough in this tarnished world, should be celebrated on those rare occasions when it manages to surface. And that is why "A Time To Kill" should be cherished -- it is 100 percent pure, high-grade, solid-gold hokum.No stone and no cliche are left unturned in its quest for utter mediocrity and lowest-common-denominator crowd-pleasing. So dedicated to the pursuit of unoffending middlebrow box-office success is "A Time to Kill" that it seems to believe staleness is a ticket to heaven.
NEWS
By RICHARD RODRIGUEZ | July 21, 1995
San Francisco. -- President Clinton is a Southerner. That fact alone may explain why, given the opportunity to rethink the logic and effect of affirmative action, he failed. In his speech this week at the National Archives before a largely black audience, the president floated old platitudes.On the other hand, several weeks ago, I was talking to a roomful of black teen-agers, most of them street kids or kids from the projects. Only one of them in a room of 13 had ever heard of anything called affirmative action.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS Jr | March 24, 1995
Miami -- Sitting in the darkness of the multiplex, I watched the white social worker and the black recovering addict battle over the black child they both call their son. I watched ''Losing Isaiah'' and, in the subtext of its nearly flawless script, heard the questions I would have asked:''You say you want to raise this black child, white lady?''What about those things he needs to know that you can't teach? Things you won't find in a book. He needs to know that the nappy hair at the nape of the neck is called the kitchen.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 21, 1994
IMAGINE that you are a 12-year-old black child who has lived her entire childhood in a succession of foster homes and faces almost no prospect of being adopted. Imagine further that you know the statistics -- of the 500,000 children in foster care, half are members of minority groups, yet white children are three times more likely than blacks to be adopted.You would be excused if you concluded that white racism was sentencing you to an inferior life. It isn't.Across the country, in case after heart-wrenching case, white parents who attempt to adopt black children are thwarted by a social-work system that places racial purity above other considerations in deciding the fates of children.
NEWS
By Cynthia Chideya | May 6, 1993
I WANT to share with Other Voices readers the work of my sixth graders at West Baltimore Middle School. When we began studying health during the second semester, we talked about how important it is to have and cultivate a good self-image. My students reflected on what it takes to be mentally healthy and strong, and one day for a homework assignment I asked them to write poems about themselves. What I got back was marvelous, much of it heartfelt and well-written.These children are regular students, some more academically adept that others.
NEWS
October 21, 2007
Dear David: I spoke to Tracey the other day. You know Tracey. She's the mother of your daughter, and the woman who probably would have married you, if you hadn't made so many bad choices over the last decade and spent so much time in prison. How is prison, anyway? I hear you're back inside one. I assume you'll read this today or one day this week, and maybe you and the other guys in Maryland's correctional facilities will take some time to reflect on what Tracey has to say. I'm not revealing your full name because, while I have Tracey's permission, I don't have yours, and because, in many respects it doesn't matter.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 21, 1994
IMAGINE that you are a 12-year-old black child who has lived her entire childhood in a succession of foster homes and faces almost no prospect of being adopted. Imagine further that you know the statistics -- of the 500,000 children in foster care, half are members of minority groups, yet white children are three times more likely than blacks to be adopted.You would be excused if you concluded that white racism was sentencing you to an inferior life. It isn't.Across the country, in case after heart-wrenching case, white parents who attempt to adopt black children are thwarted by a social-work system that places racial purity above other considerations in deciding the fates of children.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder News Service | March 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Every school day in the United States, more than 3,000 black students are suspended from public school, more than 500 black students drop out. Every day, more than 800 black teen-age girls become pregnant, approximately 126 black youths are arrested for violent crime, 34 black infants die, five black children are murdered, one black child commits suicide.Such shocking statistics have propelled more than 100 leading black child advocates, community activists and religious leaders from around the country to unite in an effort to rescue black children.
NEWS
December 7, 1992
Baltimore's Adoption Policy Needs ChangeI found the statistics on successful trans-racial adoptions in "Adopting Across Racial Lines" by Howard Altstein (Opinion * Commentary, Nov. 18) a powerful argument for changing public policies in the city of Baltimore and in the state of Maryland. The adoption issue also shows how race and racial relations affect every aspect of social life.I speak from direct experiences, as my wife and I -- a white couple -- set out down the road of adoption late in 1991.
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