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By Sloane Brown | June 17, 2001
Places to go, people to see -- the Hyatt Regency Hotel was full of them -- thanks to the Associated Black Charities annual gala, this year titled "Through the Eyes of our Community." The shindig took up almost the entire mezzanine, every nook and cranny offering different entertainment. A jazz band performed in one room, a dance band in another. There were casino games, stand-up comedy and an art exhibition -- not to mention cocktails and dinner. And then there were the 1,350 guests, including: Otis Warren, event chair; Fred Lazarus, Jerome Stephens, Florence Maultsby and Harold Williams, event committee members; Victor C. March, ABC board chair; Shirley Marcus Allen, Kenneth R. Banks and Virgie Williams, board members; Donna Jones Stanley, ABC executive director; Bruce Bereano, Maryland lobbyist; Kenneth Harris Sr., Comcast corporate affairs director; Travis Winkey, Baltimore-based fashion-show producer; Vernon A. Reid, T. Rowe Price vice president; Stephanie Dunn-Hunt, Dunn & Associates president / CEO; Dale Cousin, Northrop Grumman field engineer; Freeman Hrabowski, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, president; Earnest Hines, American Skyline Insurance president / CEO; Terry Dean, Baltimore Development Corp.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Jada Pinkett Smith sounds maybe a little jealous of her kids? Not really. The Baltimore native is a good mom, and she's happy for the success 15-year-old Jaden and 12-year-old Willow (who turns 13 this month) are realizing. But maybe she can't help but wish she had the head start they're both enjoying. "Their start is going to be far beyond anything that Will or I could have imagined," she says, casually bringing husband Will Smith into the conversation. "Will and I, we had to come into Hollywood and make something out of it, we were first generation.
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NEWS
By Michael Fletcher and Michael Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | May 26, 1992
The words by Frederick Douglass on the right grace the annual report of Associated Black Charities, an organization established seven years ago to funnel charitable donations to community groups serving the black community of central Maryland.Those words are also something of a rallying cry for ABC, a group that aims to organize the charitable giving that goes on among blacks in Greater Baltimore.Since its formation, ABC has given away more than $2.8 million to help fund more than 78 programs attacking problems hitting the black community particularly hard.
NEWS
May 5, 2011
Mayor Rawlings-Blake has asked Baltimoreans to set aside differences on key projects for the city and move ahead, in the spirit of "Do it Now. " ( "What would Schaefer do?" May 1) We applaud the mayor's leadership on these topics and hope that all of us can invoke our mayor's call "to constantly seek ways to reinvent Baltimore for the future, through hard work, sound compromise and fierce determination. " Diane Bell-McKoy, president, Associated Black Charities; John B. Frisch, chairman, Downtown Partnership of Baltimore; Tom Wilcox, president, Baltimore Community Foundation
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Associated Black Charities hopes to boost donations this weekend with a radio-thon over two Baltimore gospel stations.The fund-raiser is the highlight of ABC's annual campaign, which aims to raise more than $100,000 when it sends its message of self-sufficiency to the black community over WGBR and WCAO (Heaven 600). The radio-thon runs from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. today and tomorrow, and from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday."This gives us an opportunity to define issues important and relevant to African-Americans . . . and to get that message out," said Kirk D. Fancher, director of development and marketing at ABC.Donna Jones Stanley, executive director of ABC, said the radio-thon will replace major fund-raising concerts the group has held.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | June 10, 2007
As Associated Black Charities threw its 22nd Annual Gala, the Sheraton Baltimore City Center Hotel was jam-packed with formally frocked guests. So many things to do, people to see. Sure, there was the dinner, the dancing, the auctions, the comedy lounge. But for many folks, this gala is the time to catch up with old friends. "You get to see a lot of people you don't see the rest of the year," explained Michelle Harris Bondima, dean of Baltimore City Community College. The hall outside the hotel's main ballroom was buzzing with people meeting and greeting, including: Maryland Court of Appeals Chief Judge Robert Bell, resplendent in a white dinner jacket; University of Maryland Baltimore County President Freeman Hrabowski and his wife, Jackie Hrabowski, a T. Rowe Price vice president; Baltimore City Public School System Chief Financial Officer Keith Scroggins; Luwanda Jenkins, special secretary of the Governor's Office of Minority Affairs; Karen Bond, director of the Center for Talent Identification at the Johns Hopkins University; and Laurie Schwartz, Baltimore development consultant.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
The Associated Black Charities, a non-profit Baltimore-based organization, announced yesterday that it plans to increase its endowment 10-fold to help low-income black people as government programs shrink from them.The ABC, which serves the greater Maryland area, said its five-year strategic plan also includes giving priority to programs dealing with economic and community development within the black community."We've touched a lot of lives so far," said Donna Jones Stanley, ABC executive director for three of its five years.
NEWS
October 8, 1996
THE RELATIONSHIP between the United Way and Baltimore's black community hasn't always been good. Many African Americans considered the agency patronizing, saying it typically excluded blacks from decisions affecting them. During that same time, many whites considered blacks consumers of charity who didn't do enough to help their own. The situation became critical in 1985 when black clergymen asked their congregations to boycott the United Way campaign because it didn't return enough money to African Americans in need.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Donna Jones Stanley is stepping down after nearly 15 years as executive director of the Associated Black Charities. Stanley, who will become president and chief executive officer of the Greater Cincinnati Urban League this fall, is credited with transforming a small organization into an agency that administers millions of dollars in grants each year to address Baltimore's social ills. "It's an organization that's now widely recognized as an entity in Baltimore that people have to deal with," said Michael Cryor, a communications consultant and former ABC board chairman.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2010
Some 800 guests converged on the Hyatt Regency for a gala to celebrate an auspicious birthday — Associated Black Charities' 25th. "I'm thrilled that we've sold out, particularly in these [tough financial] times," said Diane Bell-McKoy . ABC's president/CEO was resplendent in a red satin gown as she and ABC board chairman Walter Amprey greeted people, many of whom had been coming to the organization's annual gala for years. Formally frocked folks mingled on the mezzanine enjoying drinks and hors d'oeuvres, and catching up with old friends, during the cocktail hour.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
On December 20, 2009, Carroll R. Armstrong Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, Inc. 4300 Wabash Ave. on Tuesday from 9 A.M. to 8 P.M., where the family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. The family will also receive friends on Wednesday at 10:00 A.M. at St Ignatius Church, 740 N. Calvert St. were Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 11:00 A.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Margaret DeMan Armstrong Award...
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
Observers say the $1 million donated by Tyler Perry to the NAACP on Monday might spark several other hefty donations from wealthy black philanthropists, gifts that could help revive the civil rights organization as it continues to face questions about its relevancy. Perry's donation marks the largest gift from an individual in the Baltimore-based organization's 100-year history. Maxim Thorne, the NAACP's senior vice president, said he hopes it will mark a shift in black charity.
NEWS
By Karlayne Parker and Karlayne Parker,UniSun Editor | August 3, 2008
There's always plenty to do during the summer. While some people prefer the outdoors, such as those participating in the Carmelo Anthony Foundation basketball tournament, there are many more, such as those at the Associated Black Charities Gala, who prefer the coolness of an air-conditioned venue. The fourth annual Carmelo Anthony H.O.O.D. Movement took place last month. It benefits disadvantaged children in the city through the Baltimore native's foundation. The weekend included a three-on-three Challenge basketball tournament and family day at Cloverdale Park.
NEWS
June 1, 2008
A guide to faith-based travel came out a few months ago. It's called The Christian Travel Planner. The $16.99 paperback includes information about missions and ministries; Christian cruises, camps and retreats; and Christian heritage sites around the world. Domestic attractions noted in the book include the Holy Land Experience biblical park in Orlando, Fla., and The Great Passion Play performed in Eureka Springs, Ark. Listings for monastic guest stays include the Monastery of Christ in the Desert in Abiquiu, N.M. The book was written by Kevin J. Wright, president of the World Religious Travel Association.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | January 11, 2008
Seeking to erase the stark economic disparities between black and white Baltimore residents, a group of civic leaders unveiled a plan yesterday to expand the city's black middle class, saying doing so is vital to the city's economic health. Called "More in the Middle," the project, spearheaded by Associated Black Charities, is the culmination of 2 1/2 years of research among business and nonprofit leaders. Through public and private partnerships, the program aims to take on the large task of closing the black-white wealth gap, while trying to reverse decades of black flight and help low-income residents climb to the ranks of the middle class.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | June 10, 2007
As Associated Black Charities threw its 22nd Annual Gala, the Sheraton Baltimore City Center Hotel was jam-packed with formally frocked guests. So many things to do, people to see. Sure, there was the dinner, the dancing, the auctions, the comedy lounge. But for many folks, this gala is the time to catch up with old friends. "You get to see a lot of people you don't see the rest of the year," explained Michelle Harris Bondima, dean of Baltimore City Community College. The hall outside the hotel's main ballroom was buzzing with people meeting and greeting, including: Maryland Court of Appeals Chief Judge Robert Bell, resplendent in a white dinner jacket; University of Maryland Baltimore County President Freeman Hrabowski and his wife, Jackie Hrabowski, a T. Rowe Price vice president; Baltimore City Public School System Chief Financial Officer Keith Scroggins; Luwanda Jenkins, special secretary of the Governor's Office of Minority Affairs; Karen Bond, director of the Center for Talent Identification at the Johns Hopkins University; and Laurie Schwartz, Baltimore development consultant.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | February 28, 2007
A nonprofit social services agency that provides food to HIV/AIDS patients and other terminally ill people in the Baltimore area may be forced to turn away 175 of its clients beginning tomorrow because of funding recommendations that have decreased the group's federal support by half. Moveable Feast is set to lose about $165,000 of its annual funding through the Ryan White Care Act because of directives made by Associated Black Charities, the agency contracted by the city to make funding recommendations for charities receiving federal AIDS money, according to Victor Basile, Moveable Feast's executive director.
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