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By WILEY A. HALL III | December 27, 1992
Ihappened to mention to a colleague that Rep. Kweisi Mfume, D. 7th, has been elected chairman of the CBC."What's the CBC?" he asked."You know," I said, "the Congressional Black Caucus.""Ah yes," said my colleague appreciatively, "they host the best fashion show in town."Similarly, news accounts of Mfume's rise to the chairmanship a few weeks ago noted that as chairman he will preside over the annual Congressional Black Caucus Weekend, which, with its fashion show and gala ball, has become the premier social event for the black hoi polloi in Washington, D.C. You would think that this is all the caucus is about -- fashion shows, and fancy dress balls and invitation-only dinners.
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NEWS
April 8, 2014
According to The Sun, Maryland legislators will pass a bill that would decriminalize possession of 10 grams or less of pot ( "Assembly set to pass wage, marijuana bills," April 7). This is a breakthrough bill, especially promoted by the Black Caucus, that should be signed into law by Gov. Martin O'Malley. For far too long the government has continued unabated in its efforts to destroy lives for a simple possession charge of small amounts of weed. It's well past the time to stop the real "reefer madness" of our times, the annual national incarceration of 800,000 people for marijuana use. The lunacy of the past government practices has fallen on the convicted as they struggle to find work with a tainted record.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | August 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- With the switch of at least three votes, the Congressional Black Caucus made clear yesterday that it would come to President Clinton's rescue on the crime bill.After a meeting at the White House with Mr. Clinton, three Black Caucus members who had voted against bringing the $33 billion measure up for final House vote last week announced that they had succumbed to his appeals to save not only the crime bill but perhaps his presidency."He was selling his presidency, the party and the fact that we will not get a better bill than this," said Rep. Charles B. Rangel, a New York Democrat who found Mr. Clinton persuasive.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
For years, R. Todd Stevens drove by the old Crownsville Hospital Center and wondered about the closed psychiatric facility. The hospital shut down in 2004, two years before Stevens moved just a couple miles down the road. He was surprised to learn the crumbling brick buildings and white cottages had been full of patients and doctors just a couple years before. "It looked like it had been closed years ago," Stevens said. Finally, his curiosity got the best of him, and Stevens decided this spring to explore the hospital's past by making a documentary.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- At a time when Democrats and Republicans in this town are at each others' throats, the Congressional Black Caucus has fashioned a compromise that ends months of internal bickering.In a rare show of bipartisan collegiality that assumed the air of a peace treaty signing, the Democratic-controlled black caucus has agreed to allow Rep. Gary Franks of Connecticut, its only Republican member, to rejoin the organization as a full-fledged member."I've come to realize the Congressional Black Caucus is no greater than the sum of its parts," Caucus Chairman Kweisi Mfume, D-Md.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 28, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Responding to charges that black elected officials are being harassed by the federal government, a member of the Congressional Black Caucus proposed yesterday the creation of a special institute or center to seek hard evidence of such cases.Recently, Attorney General Richard L. Thornburgh was asked to create a special commission to investigate instances of inappropriate or overzealous government investigation and prosecution of black elected officials. But the attorney general said he first needed "evidence" of such instances.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 27, 1998
A Prince George's County Democrat assumed the chairmanship of the Maryland Legislative Black Caucus last night, succeeding former Sen. Larry Young of Baltimore.Del. Carolyn J. B. Howard, who had been vice chairman, was selected to serve the remainder of Young's term, which expires June 30.Young was expelled from the Senate on Jan. 16 for apparent violations of state ethics laws.Howard has been in the House of Delegates since 1988.Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden, a Baltimore Democrat, will serve as vice chairman, Howard said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
In another sign of Baltimore's diminishing influence in Annapolis, a second-term Eastern Shore delegate defeated longtime city Del. Clarence Davis in the race for chairman of the Legislative Black Caucus. The election of Del. Rudolph C. Cane, who represents Dorchester and Wicomico counties, ends an unwritten but long-held tradition within the black caucus of alternating the chairmanship between Baltimore and Prince George's County, the jurisdictions where the overwhelming majority of the 43 African-American senators and delegates live.
NEWS
By ADONIS E. HOFFMAN | November 15, 1994
Washington.--The American electorate changed the course of American politics last week. Buried among the many stories of defeated incumbents will be the inglorious end of an era for black members of Congress, who will now become the minority's minority.While most black members were easily re-elected, the collective clout of the Congressional Black Caucus was foreclosed the moment Republicans achieved majority status in the House.Reaching a record-high 40 members in 1992, the Black Caucus boasted a political status far superior to its numbers.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Lyle Denniston and Karen Hosler and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Black Caucus, the group that vetoed one of President Clinton's earlier choices for the government's top civil rights post, unanimously endorsed yesterday the current choice: Boston lawyer Deval Patrick."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
It's a piece of history that many in Maryland want to forget: an underfunded, overcrowded, state-run mental hospital where African-American patients lived in squalid conditions, were given few helpful treatments and were made the subjects of experiments — possibly against their will. Crownsville Hospital Center was eventually integrated and became a modern mental health facility. But for decades — from its founding in 1911 to the 1960s — the now-shuttered hospital offered substandard care to poor, sick, black Marylanders, according to historians, advocates and state officials.
NEWS
By Bernard C. “Jack” Young | March 26, 2013
For many Marylanders, Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed fiscal year 2014 budget includes plenty to celebrate. The governor's "balanced approach" to budgeting translates into increased employment, health care benefits for additional families and continued investment in programs that directly support primary education. The governor's budget also includes encouraging signs that Maryland's recovery from the Great Recession is gathering steam. But despite those successes, the budget fails to fully invest in some of our state's brightest minds.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
The Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland is pushing legislation to close what it describes as loopholes in state law that allow police to keep DNA samples from people never convicted of crimes. Del. Jill P. Carter, a Baltimore Democrat, said Friday she is preparing — with caucus backing — to introduce a bill that would subject all DNA collected by Maryland police to the restrictive standards used for genetic information taken from people charged with violent crimes and burglaries.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Hundreds of students and supporters of Maryland's historically black colleges and universities rallied Monday in Annapolis to press for increased state funding to make up for decades of discrimination. The presidents of Morgan State University, Coppin State University, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore joined civil rights leaders and several politicians in front of the State House to call on Gov. Martin O'Malley to settle a lawsuit alleging the schools have been underfunded at least since the 1930s.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | March 26, 2012
Wearing hoodies, members of Maryland Legislative Black Caucus this afternoon called upon the U.S. Department of Justice to examine a Florida law that has become controversial in the wake of the death of Trayvon Martin. "We believe justice has not been served," said Sen. Catherine Pugh, a Baltimore Democrat who leads the Black Caucus. "We want people in the city, state and country to realize we have to be more culturally sensitive. " "You should not make assumptions because of what someone is wearing ... or the color of their skin," Pugh said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley released his congressional redistricting plan Saturday evening, hours after a handful of African-American lawmakers walked out of a Legislative Black Caucus meeting and prevented the group from taking an official position on an earlier draft. O'Malley's map makes only a handful of changes to the boundaries drawn by an advisory committee, adding some neighborhoods in Montgomery County to the 8th Congressional District that Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen had requested.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Karen Hosler and John B. O'Donnell and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | October 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Black Caucus was quick to praise the humanitarian mission to Somalia when President George Bush announced it in December.But it took Rep. Kweisi Mfume of Baltimore, the caucus chairman, more than two days to say anything about the chorus of cries for a U.S. withdrawal that followed the weekend battle in Mogadishu that left 13 Americans dead and scores wounded. Shortly after President Clinton finished speaking last evening, the Baltimore congressman finally made public comments, saying the caucus supported the president's actions.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 30, 2010
A group of black lawmakers appears to have blocked Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's effort to end voters' ability to choose Circuit Court judges. Gansler's proposal, which aimed to replace contested elections with retention elections every 10 years, is languishing in key committees in the House of Delegates and the Senate. The chairmen of both said Monday that the Legislative Black Caucus' strong opposition has doomed Gansler's bill. "That spelled its demise," said Sen. Brian E. Frosh, a Montgomery County Democrat and chairman of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, who does not plan to forward the legislation to the full Senate.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 29, 2010
A group of black lawmakers appears to have blocked Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's effort to end voters' ability to choose Circuit Court judges. Gansler's proposal, which aimed to replace contested elections with retention elections every 10 years, is languishing in key committees in the House of Delegates and the Senate. The chairmen of both said Monday that the Legislative Black Caucus' strong opposition has doomed Gansler's bill. "That spelled its demise," said Sen. Brian E. Frosh, a Montgomery County Democrat and chairman of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, who does not plan to forward the legislation to the full Senate.
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