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By LAWRENCE OTIS GRAHAM | August 11, 2006
For the first time in our nation's history, there are serious black candidates in both the Republican and Democratic parties who are running in multiple U.S. Senate and gubernatorial races. But can any of them cross the racial divide and win? Not likely. Many commentators are pointing to these half-dozen candidates as evidence that our country has reached a watershed moment and finally learned to embrace and accept African-Americans into the political fabric as important elected officials.
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August 19, 2011
Editor: This is in reply to SGM Porter's opinions in the Aug. 12 Open Forum. To begin with, I agree on your stance on eliminating foreign aid, but you omitted withholding funds for the United Nation and evicting them fromNew York. As for white Americans not accepting Obama due to race, most white Americans would support qualified black candidates for president such as Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice who have vast leadership and diplomatic experience. Not an inexperienced community organizer with Marxist - Leninist views.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
The only black Republican candidate in Howard County charged yesterday that the local branch of the NAACP intentionally left her name off a list of black candidates in the group's newsletter."
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | September 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush urged Republican presidential candidates to actively seek support from black voters, addressing concerns yesterday over the decision by his party's top contenders to skip a nationally televised debate next week at Morgan State University. During a White House news conference, Bush stopped short of calling on Rudolph W. Giuliani, John McCain, Mitt Romney and Fred Thompson to participate in Thursday's forum at the historically black school in Baltimore, which is to focus on minority issues.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1999
Chanting "The Sun is unfair to blacks," several African-American ministers and about 40 supporters rallied yesterday outside the newspaper's Calvert Street headquarters to protest what they perceive to be racially biased coverage of Baltimore's mayoral campaign.Protesters complained that the newspaper has prominently displayed critical articles on the three leading black candidates for mayor, while downplaying or ignoring stories that would place them in a more favorable light. The leading white candidate has not received similar scrutiny, they said.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
When it comes to the game of politics, Melvin L. Stukes, a candidate for City Council in South Baltimore's 6th District, likes a narrow playing field.But the field Stukes sees this year contains 14 candidates for the three seats from the 6th. And seven of the 14 candidates are black, Stukes among them.Stukes finished fourth in the 1987 election and he rates his chances as the best to become the first black elected to the 6th.The large field of black candidates, Stukes contends, will split the black vote and reduce his chances.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | October 6, 1994
A local NAACP official said yesterday that an "inadvertent mistake" led to the county's only black Republican candidate being left off a list of black candidates in the group's newsletter.Kenneth Jennings, the Howard County chapter's first vice president and editor of its publication, The Commitment, said the omission of Evelyn L. Tanner's name from its August newsletter was unintentional."It's unfortunate that this happened, but I was up at 1:30 a.m. putting together the newsletter," Mr. Jennings said.
NEWS
By PATRICK GILBERT | July 21, 1991
Shortly after the voting polls close in this year's councilmanic elections in Baltimore, someone in the city's black community is going to stand up and say ''I told you so.''Back in March during the debates over councilmanic redistricting, a lot of brash predictions were made as to what a new redistricting plan would mean to the outcome of the election.The plan -- designed primarily by Councilman Carl Stokes, D-2nd -- increased the number of districts that have a black majority population from three to five, leaving only one majority-white district.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | November 15, 1992
Elections are like thermometers. They're good for gauging the social and political temperature of where we live. That's why I was a little alarmed by the results that came out of the race for the Howard County Board of Education on Nov. 3. I would classify it as a low-grade fever, a sort of creeping bias that has infected the community.Of the four candidates who ran for the board, only two could win.Sandra French and Linda Johnston, both of whom are white, won by large margins, garnering 47,170 votes and 39,082 votes respectively.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | August 24, 1995
Early on, as three black candidates and one white one began campaigning for City Council president, most people would only whisper about the role race would have on the contest's outcome. Then Joseph J. DiBlasi, who is white, made the issue decidedly public by declaring he would target only white voters.Now race counts.Since Mr. DiBlasi's comments this month, critics have lambasted him for playing the race card. And his opponents -- Lawrence A. Bell III, Vera P. Hall and Carl Stokes -- are getting warnings from leaders of the black community who say at least one of the three should drop out. Unless one does, Mr. DiBlasi could triumph by splitting the black vote three ways, they say, which was Mr. DiBlasi's strategy.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | February 20, 2007
Bowie -- At a diversity forum yesterday at Bowie State University, Gov. Martin O'Malley told an audience that blacks and whites alike share the responsibility to ensure racial justice and opportunity for all. "I grew up in a household where the names King and Kennedy were revered ... not so much for what they did in their lives but for the needful things they gave their lives to pursue," O'Malley said, referring to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., President...
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | October 15, 2006
Does anyone really think Republicans have a better modern record on civil rights than Democrats? The question arises in light of the suggestion that black voters in Maryland should abandon the Democratic Party, whose leaders endorsed the 1960s civil rights legislation at the risk of the party's historic dominance in the politics of the South - and the nation. When President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act, he predicted that the previously "solid" Southern Democrats would seek refuge in the GOP. He was right.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | September 10, 2006
With an unusually large number of African-American candidates vying for statewide office this year, voters, politicians and political observers are discussing how the topic of race will play out during the campaign season. If former Rep. Kweisi Mfume wins Tuesday's Democratic primary, he will likely face GOP candidate Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, marking a first-ever matchup between black candidates for a Maryland Senate seat. Some political observers hope that contest, coupled with the presence of black candidates Del. Anthony G. Brown (who is assured a spot on the Democratic ticket for lieutenant governor)
NEWS
By LAWRENCE OTIS GRAHAM | August 11, 2006
For the first time in our nation's history, there are serious black candidates in both the Republican and Democratic parties who are running in multiple U.S. Senate and gubernatorial races. But can any of them cross the racial divide and win? Not likely. Many commentators are pointing to these half-dozen candidates as evidence that our country has reached a watershed moment and finally learned to embrace and accept African-Americans into the political fabric as important elected officials.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | May 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Brace yourself, America. I'm going to stick my neck out and make a prediction. I'm going to predict a future presidential matchup that, I guarantee you, is as reliable as any other serious, long-range political prediction. Here it is: Democratic Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois vs. Republican Gov. Kenneth Blackwell of Ohio. I know, I know, a couple of things have to fall into place before this scenario can happen. First, Mr. Blackwell, now Ohio's secretary of state, will have to beat his Democratic opponent, U.S. Rep. Ted Strickland, in November.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 12, 2004
CHICAGO - The Rev. Al Sharpton's presidential campaign, odd from its very beginning, has proved one thing: He can attract a lot of votes in black districts as long as the other candidates don't show up. Mr. Sharpton, who came in fourth in Michigan's Democratic caucuses on Saturday, finished a strong second in two black districts in Detroit. He was the only candidate to campaign vigorously in Detroit's black neighborhoods. At a forum in a prominent black Baptist church on the evening before the caucuses, for example, he was the only candidate to show up. Similarly, Mr. Sharpton carried the District of Columbia's black precincts in a straw vote a few weeks earlier, a process that does not result in sending any delegates to the party's national convention.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Marilyn McCraven and Robert Guy Matthews and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1996
Fifty years ago, Victorine Q. Adams wasn't patient enough to wait until white Baltimore politicians would allow blacks to gain representation.So the tiny woman who ran a charm school formed the Colored Women's Democratic Campaign Committee and blazed a trail that eventually led this year to blacks holding the top elected offices in Baltimore and the majority of the City Council seats for the first time.Yesterday, black elected officials said "Thank You" to Adams during a ceremony in City Hall.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Staff Writer | December 21, 1993
NAACP lawyers yesterday attacked the state's legislative district lines on the lower Eastern Shore, arguing that they polarize white voters against black candidates.The arguments marked the opening of a two-day trial in federal court, where the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is holding a microscope on the voting patterns in two state legislative districts that include Dorchester, Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester counties.Only nine blacks in those counties have ever been elected to any public office, said attorney Peter Forbes, who is representing the NAACP.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
Standing in front of the city's morgue yesterday, Carl Stokes officially declared that he is challenging Mayor Martin O'Malley in September's primary election. Stokes lost to O'Malley in the 1999 election, but said he believes the popular incumbent is vulnerable because the mayor failed to reduce homicides in the city as promised. "I have come to this place, the city morgue, because far too many of our citizens continue to arrive here as a result of murder," Stokes said from a podium set up on the sidewalk outside the Penn Street morgue.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 28, 2002
DALLAS - The future of the Democratic Party is getting road-tested this fall in the biggest Republican state in the country. It's been a bumpy ride. With a week to go, Republicans hold a considerable lead in Texas' gubernatorial and Senate contests, according to the latest statewide polls. It would take a huge turnout by black and Hispanic voters to erase that advantage, something few here are predicting. Democrats had hoped to end the GOP monopoly on major offices in President Bush's home state by promoting their unusually diverse ticket - headed by a wealthy Latino candidate for governor and a pro-business black nominee for Senate.
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