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By From Staff Reports | May 11, 1994
More than 60 leading entrepreneurs, politicians and academic experts are to gather this afternoon in Baltimore to start "Black Entrepreneurship in America," a three-day conference that seeks to promote black business.Registration starts today at 3 p.m. and is followed by EXPO '94, a trade fair featuring businesses seeking minority vendors. During the evening, executives from host company Dow Jones & Co. will greet participants.Tomorrow, politicians such as Gov. William Donald Schaefer and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke will speak, followed by a round-table discussion on problems and opportunities facing black-owned businesses.
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Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 17, 2013
I can hear 'em now. "He's a good guy"; "He's a family man"; "He'll govern like a moderate"; "It will be so good for the country"; "He's post-partisan. " That the election of a mixed-race candidate for president sent positive messages about America around the world is without question; that the election occurred less than 50 years after the end of Jim Crow was stunning - and spoke volumes about how far we have progressed on race and politics. Yet, the entire post-partisan narrative was quite a stretch (and silly to boot)
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NEWS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1990
Maryland ranks first in the nation in the proportion of black-owned businesses compared with all businesses in the state, according to a report released today by the state's Department of Economic and Employment Development.The proportion of black-owned firms was 8.9 percent of the state's total number of businesses, significantly above the national average of 3.1 percent in 1987, the most recent year for which figures are available.Maryland also leads the nation in the number of black-owned businesses per 1,000 people, said the report, which is based on data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2010
Sherrie Koen got pushed around at a Toys "R" Us store on Black Friday a year ago. Someone ran into her with a shopping cart. Someone else grabbed a toy out of her hands. No way that was going to happen this year. Instead, bright and early Thursday, Koen was standing outside The Mall in Columbia waiting for Sears to open, the first time it had done so on Thanksgiving Day. "I was very excited that I wasn't going to get trampled," said Koen, a building contractor from Millerstown, Pa., four days after being released from treatment for a back injury that she did not want to exacerbate.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | July 13, 1993
Bob Wallace recalls with clarity the anger and bewilderment he felt several years ago on a visit to his boyhood haunt, South Baltimore's gritty Cherry Hill neighborhood.The mechanical engineer had stopped by the neighborhood to catch up with old chums.Instead of camaraderie, he found himself haranguing a group of old friends because virtually every corner store was owned by Asian Americans."I was standing on a street corner yelling at my buddies. I was so angry. None of them owned their own business.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
Martin Luther King III will lead the nation's new crop of civil rights activists into Baltimore today to participate in the city's first African-American Economic Summit.The two-day free event at New Psalmist Baptist Church hopes to lure young black entrepreneurs into the city to create new business and jobs.Baltimore City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III organized the conference as the next step in the African-American civil rights movement. Bell hopes new black-owned businesses can begin to replace companies and jobs that have fled Baltimore in the past 30 years.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | January 14, 1991
Talk is cheap.So say black businessmen Ray Haysbert, Joe Haskins, Arnold Williams and James McLean.For them, rhetoric doesn't cut it when the subject is boosting minority entrepreneurial activity. They prefer a sleeves-rolled-up frontal assault, without fanfare or assistance from alphabet soup governmental agencies.They're battling, one skirmish at a time, to secure economic vitality for the Baltimore area's black community. Their salvos are in the form of some guidance here, an infusion of capital there and are calculated to eventually coalesce into an economic critical mass.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1998
Management consultant Walter E. Morgan is standing with real estate broker Harry M. Dunbar, waiting for breakfast and talking politics. Both are African-American Democrats from Columbia, both voted for Parris N. Glendening in 1994 and Dunbar is voting for him again this year.But neither is supporting the Democratic candidate for Howard County executive, James N. Robey. Indeed, their political chat took place at a $250-a-person fund-raiser Thursday for Robey's Republican opponent, Councilman Dennis R. Schrader.
BUSINESS
By Oscar Suris and Oscar Suris,Orlando Sentinel | April 4, 1992
ATLANTA -- A national conference of black business leaders yesterday identified black entrepreneurial efforts as the key to a new economic civil rights movement.Disappointed with the welfare system and frustrated by legal challenges to set-aside programs, some blacks are embracing entrepreneurship as the best tool they have against economic inequities that have kept some of them from acquiring wealth.More than 300 prominent blacks from academia, government and the manufacturing and service industries discussed the challenges facing black entrepreneurs at a national conference sponsored by Dow Jones & Co., the publishers of The Wall Street Journal.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
Raymond V. Haysbert has lots of war stories from the days when the founders of Parks Sausage Co. were trying to make their mark, but few gall him more than the one about the time in the 1950s when a Baltimore bank wouldn't lend them $25,000 for inventory when they had $30,000 in the bank."
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
With just 3 1/2 weeks until Election Day, a group of African-American political, religious and business leaders from Baltimore unveiled a six-point agenda yesterday challenging candidates running for statewide office to confront such concerns as racial disparities in criminal justice and black business development. Led by U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, state Sen. Verna L. Jones and Bishop Walter Thomas of New Psalmist Baptist Church, the group has taken the name Strategic Alliance and comprises about 40 prominent African-Americans.
NEWS
By McClatchy Newspapers | October 9, 2006
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- For Kitty Green, the NAACP's call for an economic boycott of the state seven years ago was a "slap in the face." While the teacher-turned-entrepreneur supports the civil rights organization's effort to remove the Confederate flag from the State House grounds, the sanctions hit her business hard. Now some members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People are questioning whether it's good policy to continue the boycott. In 2000, the flag was moved from atop the State House dome to a monument in front of the capitol, and there's no plan to move it again.
BUSINESS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | May 28, 2004
Ten Maryland-based companies, including six from the Baltimore region, are among the top firms owned by African-Americans in the region, according to Black Enterprise magazine. The New York-based publication released its annual listing of the nation's largest black-owned companies based on 2003 revenues. It is the magazine's 32nd annual ranking. Radio One Inc., the Lanham-based owner of broadcast stations targeting African-Americans, ranked the highest -- No. 8 -- on BE's list of industrial and service companies, the magazine's primary ranking.
NEWS
February 9, 2004
Guess who A new exhibit in the City Hall rotunda recognizes the city's black business pioneers. Just one problem: Whoever put up the 19 portraits last week wasn't sure who was who. Most of the portraits are paired with a little plaque that includes the subject's name and a biographical sketch. But several are accompanied only by a Post-It note with a name and question mark scribbled on it. Is that bald guy with the mustache really Dr. Joseph H. Thomas, physician and owner of a Turners Station movie theater?
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
When the Rev. Walter E. Middlebrooks convened a group of Anne Arundel County clergymen and women last spring to discuss economic issues facing the African-American community, they found they had some common concerns. They talked about how black-owned firms received only about 7 percent of last year's county contracts and slightly more than 1 percent of the school system's contracts. They tossed around the idea of asking government officials to conduct disparity studies. Several people left the meeting convinced that they needed to create an entity that could give aid to black businesses and lobby for changes.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2002
In the brief history of the county Economic Development Authority's NeoTech incubator, Michael Haines has noticed a problem. Business owners who have landed in the county-sponsored facility have come from as far as India, and as near as Columbia, but not one of them has been African-American. In a community with a 12 percent African-American population, the lack of participation is a cause of concern, according to Haines, director of business development for the incubator. "It started to concern me that we're not understanding that side of the business community," he said.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1994
Despite record growth in the 1980s and many examples of individual success, black-owned businesses still contribute a disproportionately small amount to the national economy. But is the way to help black business through strengthening government programs or dismantling them?That was the focus yesterday during the Black Entrepreneurship in America conference, the third annual meeting of national business and political leaders designed to promote black business."In order to be successful, our country has got to be more successful in spreading small business opportunity throughout the country," Vice President Al Gore told several hundred black business leaders.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
With just 3 1/2 weeks until Election Day, a group of African-American political, religious and business leaders from Baltimore unveiled a six-point agenda yesterday challenging candidates running for statewide office to confront such concerns as racial disparities in criminal justice and black business development. Led by U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, state Sen. Verna L. Jones and Bishop Walter Thomas of New Psalmist Baptist Church, the group has taken the name Strategic Alliance and comprises about 40 prominent African-Americans.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2001
You don't have to look far for signs of a new Baltimore taking shape. From a Super Bowl victory to a new hotel to frequent announcements of new office and apartment complexes, the evidence of a resurgence is everywhere. But many black business owners worry that they're missing out on the new wealth. "We are really not a part of this new renaissance that we have in Baltimore City," said LaRian L. Finney, president and chief executive officer of Visionary Marketing Group Inc. of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | October 15, 2000
IT IS A STRANGE day when Kenneth "Kenny Bird" Jackson becomes the poster child for martyrdom in the city of Baltimore, but there we are. A half-dozen prominent politicians gathered around his wounded body last week, and never mind the wounded bodies at Jackson's place of business, the strip joint called the El Dorado Lounge. The politicians who carried Jackson's bloody banner last week spoke the language of money and real estate. They might have a point. Then they waved the banner of "minority" interests.
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