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NEWS
May 10, 2013
Over the past few weeks, I have quietly waited for someone to write in a sensible argument regarding the issue of the White Student Union at Towson University. I can no longer remain quiet. Let us remind ourselves of a few facts. White people are still in the majority in this country and on the campus of TU. Black people are still in the minority in this country as well as on the campus of TU. Lest we forget the atrocities that have been committed against our black brothers and sisters in this country.
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NEWS
May 10, 2013
Over the past few weeks, I have quietly waited for someone to write in a sensible argument regarding the issue of the White Student Union at Towson University. I can no longer remain quiet. Let us remind ourselves of a few facts. White people are still in the majority in this country and on the campus of TU. Black people are still in the minority in this country as well as on the campus of TU. Lest we forget the atrocities that have been committed against our black brothers and sisters in this country.
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NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 9, 1990
TEMPLE HILLS -- Three thousand people packed a suburban Washington church yesterday for the funeral of 20-year-old James Stanley "Jay" Bias III.The stage was filled, and so was the auditorium and balcony. In a nearby room, more than 1,000 mourners -- unable to find space with the rest of the congregation -- watched the service on television monitors.Those who came to the Full Gospel A.M.E. Zion Church on Norcross Road to pay their last respects to the younger brother of the late University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias met with a great challenge and small comfort.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2013
Isaiah Dixon Jr., a jazz fan, world traveler and four-term state delegate from Baltimore City whose accomplishments included introducing a bill that made cross burnings a felony in Maryland, died of heart failure April 26 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 90. "He took his position very seriously," said Baltimore Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway, a longtime friend who served two terms alongside Mr. Dixon in the General Assembly. "He thought that he needed to make a difference, and he tried.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 4, 1996
Butch McAdams, the sports guy for WOLB talk radio, put it best Thursday morning."What's the difference between a new-born puppy and Joe Frazier?" McAdams asked early morning talk show host Bernie McCain."
NEWS
By From staff reports | October 17, 1995
Schmoke's speech is a rouser, even if unscheduledStanding on the steps of the U.S. Capitol, Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke was so inspired by the crowd that he clasped the hand of the man next to him and in an emotional, rousing speech urged all to work hand-in-hand toward a better future.He did not come to the march to speak, but Mr. Schmoke joined Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer and Washington Mayor Marion Barry in addressing the masses of men. Mr. Schmoke described it as "one of the most uplifting experiences I've ever had."
NEWS
By Malena Amusa and Malena Amusa,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2004
When it was his turn to perform, Cortez Holmes looked and sounded like an experienced and confident hip-hop artist. Sporting a red T-shirt and blue jeans, Cortez, 12, bobbed his head to underscore the beat. "I shine like Afro sheen, and dress in all black 'cause I don't want to be seen," he rapped as his peers cheered him on. Cortez's performance was part of an innovative program designed to help youths gain a sense of confidence in expressing themselves through art workshops. He joined more than 15 other youngsters, most of whom are under foster care, for weekly rap and poetry lessons.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2013
Isaiah Dixon Jr., a jazz fan, world traveler and four-term state delegate from Baltimore City whose accomplishments included introducing a bill that made cross burnings a felony in Maryland, died of heart failure April 26 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 90. "He took his position very seriously," said Baltimore Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway, a longtime friend who served two terms alongside Mr. Dixon in the General Assembly. "He thought that he needed to make a difference, and he tried.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 11, 1994
Washington -- Jesse Jackson was looking very much like a has-been as recently as two months ago.After building up hopes, then ducking out of running for mayor of the District of Columbia, his stellar career as a tree-shaker and headline grabber seemed to slide to the brink of oblivion.After two unsuccessful campaigns for president, his campaign for District of Columbia statehood, a stillborn issue that he single-handedly reignited, was going nowhere fast. His opposition to NAFTA left his image almost as battered as Ross Perot's opposition left his. Mr. Jackson was marching tirelessly for various causes, but was anyone listening?
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
CHESTERTOWN - In a racially charged case that has put rural Kent County in an unaccustomed spotlight, a 20-year-old Eastern Shore man was convicted yesterday of second-degree murder and two counts of attempted murder in the Dec. 4 shotgun slaying of a 73-year-old black woman as she and two companions returned home from Christmas shopping. Daniel R. Starkey, who with his 24-year-old brother, David W. Starkey Jr., was charged with murder and committing a hate crime in the death of Germaine Porcea Clarkston, could face up to 30 years in prison on each count.
NEWS
By Malena Amusa and Malena Amusa,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2004
When it was his turn to perform, Cortez Holmes looked and sounded like an experienced and confident hip-hop artist. Sporting a red T-shirt and blue jeans, Cortez, 12, bobbed his head to underscore the beat. "I shine like Afro sheen, and dress in all black 'cause I don't want to be seen," he rapped as his peers cheered him on. Cortez's performance was part of an innovative program designed to help youths gain a sense of confidence in expressing themselves through art workshops. He joined more than 15 other youngsters, most of whom are under foster care, for weekly rap and poetry lessons.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
CHESTERTOWN - In a racially charged case that has put rural Kent County in an unaccustomed spotlight, a 20-year-old Eastern Shore man was convicted yesterday of second-degree murder and two counts of attempted murder in the Dec. 4 shotgun slaying of a 73-year-old black woman as she and two companions returned home from Christmas shopping. Daniel R. Starkey, who with his 24-year-old brother, David W. Starkey Jr., was charged with murder and committing a hate crime in the death of Germaine Porcea Clarkston, could face up to 30 years in prison on each count.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 4, 1996
Butch McAdams, the sports guy for WOLB talk radio, put it best Thursday morning."What's the difference between a new-born puppy and Joe Frazier?" McAdams asked early morning talk show host Bernie McCain."
NEWS
By From staff reports | October 17, 1995
Schmoke's speech is a rouser, even if unscheduledStanding on the steps of the U.S. Capitol, Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke was so inspired by the crowd that he clasped the hand of the man next to him and in an emotional, rousing speech urged all to work hand-in-hand toward a better future.He did not come to the march to speak, but Mr. Schmoke joined Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer and Washington Mayor Marion Barry in addressing the masses of men. Mr. Schmoke described it as "one of the most uplifting experiences I've ever had."
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 11, 1994
Washington -- Jesse Jackson was looking very much like a has-been as recently as two months ago.After building up hopes, then ducking out of running for mayor of the District of Columbia, his stellar career as a tree-shaker and headline grabber seemed to slide to the brink of oblivion.After two unsuccessful campaigns for president, his campaign for District of Columbia statehood, a stillborn issue that he single-handedly reignited, was going nowhere fast. His opposition to NAFTA left his image almost as battered as Ross Perot's opposition left his. Mr. Jackson was marching tirelessly for various causes, but was anyone listening?
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 9, 1990
TEMPLE HILLS -- Three thousand people packed a suburban Washington church yesterday for the funeral of 20-year-old James Stanley "Jay" Bias III.The stage was filled, and so was the auditorium and balcony. In a nearby room, more than 1,000 mourners -- unable to find space with the rest of the congregation -- watched the service on television monitors.Those who came to the Full Gospel A.M.E. Zion Church on Norcross Road to pay their last respects to the younger brother of the late University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias met with a great challenge and small comfort.
NEWS
July 30, 2006
On July 23, 2006 CAROLYN EMILY (nee Knowles), widow of the late Edward T. Mc Carty. Survived by sons Thomas of Indiana and Dan of Colorado and their wives; grandchildren Edward, Brian and Arianna Mc Carty; sister Grace Black and brothers James of York and Dr. Millard B. Knowles of White Marsh. A Memorial Service will be held on Sunday, August 6 at the Govans-Boundary United Methodist Church, 5210 York Rd., at 1 P.M., with Family greeting preceding at noon. Arrangements by the BRADLEY-ASHTON FUNERAL HOME, P.A.
FEATURES
By A. Dahleen Glanton and A. Dahleen Glanton,Chicago Tribune | March 12, 1992
CHICAGO -- There's Essence magazine to help African-American women build relationships with African-American men.And there's EM/Ebony Man for African-American men who want to strengthen their relationships with African-American women.Then there's Jet, which keeps African-American men and women up to date on what other African-American men and women are doing.Now there's another magazine, African Newbreed, which helps African men and women who are new to America understand African-American men and women -- as well as other African men and women.
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