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By Seattle Times | January 15, 1991
Nutritional breakdownMakes 4 servings. Each serving has:* Calories: 361* Protein: 31 grams* Carbohydrates: 42 grams* Fat: 8 grams* Saturated fat: 1 gram* Cholesterol: 56 milligrams* Sodium: 381 milligramsShopping list3 boneless and skinless chicken breast halves4 flour tortillas1 jalapeno pepper1 15-ounce can black beans1 large ripe tomato1 small bunch cilantro1 medium red onionFresh lime juice1/4 cup plain low-fat yogurtPantry: cayenne pepper, clove garlic,...
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By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | July 15, 2013
Danielle ate her first bite of baby cereal on her 6-month birthday. I had a cupcake to celebrate this milestone (totally fair, right?). As cereal dribbled down her chin, little did I know how much I would obsess and fret over her nutritional intake of solids in the months to follow. Or just how simple her all-milk diet had been. Her diet is like an ever-changing puzzle that I am constantly adjusting and learning. I try to remind myself that what goes into her mouth is one of the few things she can control in her little world, so I try not to let her protestations rattle me. But I do often wonder what's going through her head.
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By Charlyne Varkonyi | September 22, 1991
Why is it that food always seems to taste better where it originates?You can't tell a Marylander that a crab cake from Seattle is better than one made from a crab fresh out of the bay. You better not try to praise the local Mexican fare to a Texan. And few Floridians will be convinced that black beans taste good outside of Miami's Little Havana or Tampa's Ybor City.Soon after I moved to Baltimore from Florida nearly five years ago, I went into black bean soup withdrawal. Since then, I have discovered some decent restaurant versions that ease the cravings.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
If you're searching for gameday atmosphere in Federal Hill but looking to avoid the foot traffic of the Mother's Purple Patio, check out its relatively new neighbor, Cowboys & Rednecks Pub. Unattractive name aside, the C&R Pub wears its country-western theme lightly, at least compared to the over-the-top yee-hawing of other "down-home" establishments. (There is no mechanical bull.) And it's a hit: Walk by C&R on a Friday or Saturday night and prepare to wait in line. Most important for Sundays, C&R Pub has more than enough flat-screen TVs to satisfy any die-hard Ravens fan. Whether you're in a booth or standing in front of the long bar, you likely won't miss an interception by Ed Reed or a flex-a-thon by Ray Rice.
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By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 8, 2005
All around the Caribbean, black beans and rice make savory, simple suppers. This version, called gallo pinto, or "spotted rooster," in Costa Rica, is one of that country's national dishes. The Costa Ricans would use a terrific savory condiment called Salsa Lizano instead of the steak sauce we suggest here. But the steak sauce is a worthy substitute. Gallo Pinto Preparation time: 15 minutes: cooking time: about 20 minutes Makes 4 servings 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 medium onion, chopped 1 teaspoon each: ground cumin, ground coriander, ground ginger 2 cans (15 ounces each)
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By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 16, 1994
Canned tuna used to be my emergency dinner, when I needed something fast. Occasionally it still is, but now I'm just as likely to open a can of beans.I used to think of these as desperation meals. However, the flavors are so good that I prefer to think of them as 15-minute menu marvels. For example, there's:* Beans and diced salami, celery, onions, oil and vinegar in a salad.* Beans wrapped in flour tortillas, topped with a little salsa or guacamole.* Beans, chilies, tomatoes and onions minced together and served with tortilla chips.
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By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 13, 2005
I have several recipes that call for Oriental black beans. Can I substitute canned Latin black beans instead? Are they the same bean? Asian black beans. Latin black beans. What's next? North Pole black beans? The fact that, yes, you can substitute Latin black beans for Oriental black beans, doesn't mean that they are the same thing. In fact, Asian black beans are soybeans that have normally been fermented and preserved in salt. In China, they are known as chi, and there is evidence that they have been used there as early as the second century B.C. These Chinese black beans have a very strong, salty flavor and are usually soaked in cold water before being added to a recipe.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 24, 1998
Even though Memorial Day falls during what the calendar designates as spring, for most of us, myself included, this holiday represents the beginning of summer. This celebration coincides with the return of longer days and warmer weather, when dining can move outdoors once again.I love this time of the year, when my kitchen can be moved outside and I can cook meats, chicken and fish as well as vegetables on the grill. I also look forward to the season's bounty of produce and make all manner of salads and rely on plump, ripe berries and juicy fruit for dessert.
NEWS
September 24, 2000
Dishes with Mexican, South American and Caribbean roots often call for black beans, which are available dried or canned in supermarkets, natural food stores and stores specializing in foods of those cuisines. Check the date on the package: Dried black beans are at their peak of quality for about a year after harvesting and processing. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
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By Charlyne Varkonyi | May 8, 1991
The Caribbean influence is more than a fad in some parts of the country -- it's become an integral part of the everyday cuisine.In places like South Florida, where some of the Caribbean islands are closer than a trip to the Northeast, many restaurants consider ingredients like black beans and rice as much a staple as salt and pepper.The following Fastlane Feast menu was inspired by a recent trip to Floridawhere we enjoyed some tasty black beans and yellow rice at the Aruba Cafe, a casual restaurant on the beach in Fort Lauderdale.
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By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2011
Jareene Barkdoll of Baltimore was hoping we would be able to find the recipe for the Southwestern-style quiche served at the Severn Inn in Annapolis. A friend treated her to Sunday brunch at the inn for her birthday, and she so enjoyed the quiche that she wanted to re-create it at home. She said it was served with an avocado salsa and topped with black beans. Philip Sokolowski, executive chef at the Severn Inn, was kind enough to share his recipe for the quiche. What makes this quiche unusual, aside from the Southwestern seasoning, is that the typical pastry crust is replaced with tortillas.
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By Baltimore Sun reporter | January 13, 2011
Jay Cohen's Turkey-Black Bean Chili Makes: 20 servings 6 pounds ground turkey 2 yellow onions, diced 1 red pepper, diced 2 tablespoons minced garlic 2 cans crushed or diced tomatoes, 28 ounces each 2 cans plum tomatoes, 28 ounces each 1 can black beans, 16.5 ounces, drained 2 tablespoons ground cumin 1 tablespoon chipotle chili powder 4 bay leaves Salt and pepper to taste...
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By Stephanie Allmon and Stephanie Allmon,McClatchy-Tribune | July 16, 2008
I got my first recipe for magic brownies at a Weight Watchers meeting. I became so hooked on the little squares of chewy, chocolaty goodness that I began testing, revising and perfecting my own version. When mixed and baked just right, they come out moist, delicious and mind-numbingly good. The secret ingredient? Black beans. That's right, magic brownies are nothing more than a can of black beans pureed and dumped into a fat-free brownie mix. I also add cinnamon, which not only perks up the flavor but has been shown in studies to help lower LDL, or "bad" cholesterol.
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By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,Chicago Tribune | December 19, 2007
I'll never forget dorm chili debates during my freshman year at Stephens College in Missouri. My classmates from Texas were horrified with the concept of including tomatoes and beans in a chili recipe. This was a culture shock for me, having grown up with black-bean chili made with ground chuck, hot peppers and tomatoes. A suitemate from upstate New York introduced me to this version, made without meat. It changed my attitude. Since then, I've tweaked the spices and beans several times.
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By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | July 11, 2007
Baked beans are an all-American summer standby. Although a recipe for classic baked beans is simple - dried beans, water, salt, dry mustard, molasses, brown sugar and salt pork - that last ingredient typically sends the fat and sodium levels through the roof. Jean Anderson, author of The Nutrition Bible, estimates a serving of baked beans has nearly 400 calories, 13 grams of fat and more than 1,000 milligrams of sodium. This recipe for Picnic Beans makes several substitutions for the sake of nutrition and convenience.
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By Brad Schleicher | May 26, 2007
What it is -- An all-natural, gluten-free rice with Latin American and Caribbean flavors What we like about it --Tambo Bamba offers three rice varieties ready in 10 minutes or less - Cuban Black Beans and Rice, Jamaican Rice and Beans and Caribbean Rice Pelau. We tried the black beans and rice. It had a mild flavor and was accented with onions, green peppers and an assortment of spices. What it costs --$3.29-$3.49 for a 6-ounce box Where to buy --Whole Foods Markets; Roots Market in Clarksville Per serving ( 1/2 cup)
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By Brad Schleicher | May 26, 2007
What it is -- An all-natural, gluten-free rice with Latin American and Caribbean flavors What we like about it --Tambo Bamba offers three rice varieties ready in 10 minutes or less - Cuban Black Beans and Rice, Jamaican Rice and Beans and Caribbean Rice Pelau. We tried the black beans and rice. It had a mild flavor and was accented with onions, green peppers and an assortment of spices. What it costs --$3.29-$3.49 for a 6-ounce box Where to buy --Whole Foods Markets; Roots Market in Clarksville Per serving ( 1/2 cup)
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By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 28, 2000
We think of stocking up on food staples as a chore for the winter. After all, who wants to go shopping in the middle of a blizzard? But we're no more interested in wasting a beautiful summer day inside a supermarket. That makes food planning a good idea year-round. Cooks usually have a few essential ingredients they always keep on hand to complement their cooking style. My favorites are frozen shrimp, long-grain rice and canned beans. A bed of rice makes a meager chicken breast look generous, and if I only have enough chili for one, adding beans means both partners in a couples-only household eat dinner.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 8, 2006
Treat yourself and family with this colorful fall dinner. Salmon fillets are baked and topped with a black-olive-and-shallot sauce. It's served with black beans and orange carrots. The tastes and textures are a treat. Diane Goodman, Miami caterer and author of The Plated Heart, suggested this festive meal in a recent interview. It's full of flavor and fun and only takes a few minutes to make. The trick to cooking this salmon is to make sure the oven is at the right temperature before putting in the fish.
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By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2006
Aquarelas Brazilian Restaurant 1622 Eastern Ave., Baltimore -- 410-276-6012 Hours --10 a.m.-9 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sundays BEST BITE Our favorite dish was the feijoada, $8.40, a traditional meal of black beans, pork, white rice, dried meat and chopped green vegetables. The surprisingly soft chunks of pork came in a side container mixed with hearty black beans. For us, the only drawback was the occasional bone in the pork, which came as a surprise. It would have been nice if the menu or server had warned us in advance.
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