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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1998
While many anglers head for Eastern Shore creeks and rivers to fish the run of white perch, black bass fishing has been improving on the Potomac, Susquehanna and Wicomico rivers as the weather warms.Life Outdoors Unlimited's Ken Penrod reports that guides working for his service (301-937-0010) have had good success throughout the region, even though river water temperatures are cool.The Upper Potomac and the Susquehanna from Duncannon to Halifax are in very good shape for smallmouths, and the upper tidal Potomac and Wicomico in the Salisbury area are good for largemouths.
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NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 5, 2006
When Kali's Court first opened seven years ago, it quickly become known for its very fresh seafood prepared in uncomplicated ways. It had a crab cake, but it was a simple crab cake (almost nothing but jumbo crab meat, in other words). The best thing on the menu was the whole grilled fish with capers, lemon juice, olive oil and herbs. Add to that good service and a beautiful setting, and the owners had a hit on their hands. Kali's Court quickly became a local favorite for expense-account meals and romantic dinners - and one of the few places in Fells Point that insisted on a dress code (business casual or dressier)
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SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | October 10, 1990
If portions of the tidal Potomac River seem unusually crowded with boat traffic today through Friday, take a closer look. More than 300 of the additional boats won't be racing to the best striped-bass grounds. Instead, those extra boats and their drivers will be looking for black bass in the $175,000 Bassmaster Maryland Invitational.The tournament, the second of 10 qualifying events for the BASS Masters Classic, will operate out of Smallwood State Park's Sweden Point Marina on Mattawoman Creek.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2003
LAKE BIWA, Japan - As the waves lap gently and a stork sweeps its long, white wings over the shore, Akihiko Kubo reaches over the side of the boat and pulls up a net filled with black bass and bluegill from the cold, dark waters. "It looks so peaceful and beautiful above the waterline," says Kubo, a director of Shiga prefecture's Fisheries Cooperative Association. "But it's a raging battle down below." Aggressive foreigners of the scaly, furry and slimy persuasion are invading Japan, with pastoral Lake Biwa a front line in the battle to stem the spread of alien species.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2003
LAKE BIWA, Japan - As the waves lap gently and a stork sweeps its long, white wings over the shore, Akihiko Kubo reaches over the side of the boat and pulls up a net filled with black bass and bluegill from the cold, dark waters. "It looks so peaceful and beautiful above the waterline," says Kubo, a director of Shiga prefecture's Fisheries Cooperative Association. "But it's a raging battle down below." Aggressive foreigners of the scaly, furry and slimy persuasion are invading Japan, with pastoral Lake Biwa a front line in the battle to stem the spread of alien species.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
Two new studies by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have categorized the demographics and participation levels of bass and trout fishermen, compared them with other freshwater fishing statistics and found that black bass appeal to the largest number of anglers in the country.The studies were designed to complement its National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Asssociated Recreation, which is issued every five years. The last national survey was released in 1991.The two new reports -- Black Bass Fishing in the U.S. and Trout Fishing in the U.S. -- ascertained the number of participating anglers, how many days each angler fished per year, age (16 and older)
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1994
In yesterday's A La Carte section, a trout was misidentified in a photo.The Sun regrets the errors.It's too bad every copy of Pino Luongo's new cookbook "Fish Talking" doesn't come with a copy of Mr. Luongo, for such is the force of his charm and passion that he would have you doing in two minutes what it will likely take me a whole story to persuade you to try.Mr. Luongo wants you to eat more fish.Not more tuna, salmon and red snapper. Those are "the big guys" -- big fish, hugely popular, and expensive.
SPORTS
June 17, 1993
CHANGES OF NOTE On Tuesday, the summer bait restrictions went into effect on the Conowingo Dam catwalk. Only worms (excluding bloodworms), chicken livers, dough baits and prepared scent baits will be allowed until Sept. 15. Artificial lures and other baits are permitted from the shoreline, but boats will not be allowed to fish the river between the dam and the power lines that cross the river at Rowland Island.The bait and access restrictions are in effect to protect the striped bass in the area.
FEATURES
By Variety of recipes make fish fixing easyAndrew Schloss and Variety of recipes make fish fixing easyAndrew Schloss,Special to The Baltimore Evening Sun | October 17, 1990
IN AN AGE of dietary doom saying, where everything from three square meals a day to the goodness of milk is being challenged, fish has emerged as the new messiah. Even its fat content, which is the bane of all other animal proteins, seems blessed with health benefits.Fish is naturally low in cholesterol and calories. It cooks quickly and radiates flavor even in the simplest presentations.The only problem is that most of us don't know the first thing about cooking fish. Reared on frozen flounder and tinned tuna, even good cooks in America frequently find themselves at a loss when confronting a swordfish steak or a red snapper shining crimson beneath its scales.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1999
This month, before the weather warms and anglers are more disposed toward boats and shorelines than classrooms, several seminars can help fine tune fishing skills for rockfish and blues, largemouth and smallmouth bass.Keith Walters, former holder of the state record for rockfish, leads off successive weekends of classes with Fishing Tips, Tackle and Techniques on Saturday at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills.Walters, who has written several books about fishing for Chesapeake Bay species, said he has structured this course to help the average angler.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - The "Bass Boss" is back at the event he founded, and now he's looking to return to television with a new weekly show. Ray Scott hopes to find a network - perhaps ESPN or Outdoor Life - to air Eagles of Angling, a bass competition that permits only 4-pound test and doesn't allow anglers to use nets to boat their fish. The 13-week show would pit two teams of two anglers against each other for a day of fishing, with the winner moving on to the next round. "I'm more convinced of this concept than I was when I started BASS," said Scott, who founded BASS in 1968 and sold it to his deputy and an Alabama investment firm in 1986.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1999
This month, before the weather warms and anglers are more disposed toward boats and shorelines than classrooms, several seminars can help fine tune fishing skills for rockfish and blues, largemouth and smallmouth bass.Keith Walters, former holder of the state record for rockfish, leads off successive weekends of classes with Fishing Tips, Tackle and Techniques on Saturday at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills.Walters, who has written several books about fishing for Chesapeake Bay species, said he has structured this course to help the average angler.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1998
While many anglers head for Eastern Shore creeks and rivers to fish the run of white perch, black bass fishing has been improving on the Potomac, Susquehanna and Wicomico rivers as the weather warms.Life Outdoors Unlimited's Ken Penrod reports that guides working for his service (301-937-0010) have had good success throughout the region, even though river water temperatures are cool.The Upper Potomac and the Susquehanna from Duncannon to Halifax are in very good shape for smallmouths, and the upper tidal Potomac and Wicomico in the Salisbury area are good for largemouths.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
Two new studies by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have categorized the demographics and participation levels of bass and trout fishermen, compared them with other freshwater fishing statistics and found that black bass appeal to the largest number of anglers in the country.The studies were designed to complement its National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Asssociated Recreation, which is issued every five years. The last national survey was released in 1991.The two new reports -- Black Bass Fishing in the U.S. and Trout Fishing in the U.S. -- ascertained the number of participating anglers, how many days each angler fished per year, age (16 and older)
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER and PETER BAKER,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
Computers have been at work in the fields of boating and fishing for several years -- most notably in navigation, weather forecasting and fish-finding -- and now multiple-access electronic communication is entering the scene, as well.Recently, Martin L. Gary, a fisheries biologist who compiles an excellent weekly fishing report for Maryland's tidal and nontidal waters, arranged to receive reports from fishermen through e-mail (mgrykex.netcom.com)."The information generated by even a small number of contributors will greatly improve the accuracy of the report, which is subject to rapid change," said Gary.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1995
One of the biggest black market fish cases in Maryland history -- becoming known as the Potomac River bass burglary -- was cracked with the help of tiny tracking devices hidden inside the fish.Prosecutors and investigators, who followed the trail of the bass from Toronto to Georgia, say the case involves the alleged sale of more than 40,000 pounds of largemouth bass caught in the Potomac from 1990 to 1993.Telltale tags three-eighths of an inch long, called passive integrated transponders, were placed under the skin of more than 3,000 wild largemouth bass in the Potomac as part of a Maryland Department of Natural Resources study to track their growth and movement.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER and PETER BAKER,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
Computers have been at work in the fields of boating and fishing for several years -- most notably in navigation, weather forecasting and fish-finding -- and now multiple-access electronic communication is entering the scene, as well.Recently, Martin L. Gary, a fisheries biologist who compiles an excellent weekly fishing report for Maryland's tidal and nontidal waters, arranged to receive reports from fishermen through e-mail (mgrykex.netcom.com)."The information generated by even a small number of contributors will greatly improve the accuracy of the report, which is subject to rapid change," said Gary.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - The "Bass Boss" is back at the event he founded, and now he's looking to return to television with a new weekly show. Ray Scott hopes to find a network - perhaps ESPN or Outdoor Life - to air Eagles of Angling, a bass competition that permits only 4-pound test and doesn't allow anglers to use nets to boat their fish. The 13-week show would pit two teams of two anglers against each other for a day of fishing, with the winner moving on to the next round. "I'm more convinced of this concept than I was when I started BASS," said Scott, who founded BASS in 1968 and sold it to his deputy and an Alabama investment firm in 1986.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1994
In yesterday's A La Carte section, a trout was misidentified in a photo.The Sun regrets the errors.It's too bad every copy of Pino Luongo's new cookbook "Fish Talking" doesn't come with a copy of Mr. Luongo, for such is the force of his charm and passion that he would have you doing in two minutes what it will likely take me a whole story to persuade you to try.Mr. Luongo wants you to eat more fish.Not more tuna, salmon and red snapper. Those are "the big guys" -- big fish, hugely popular, and expensive.
SPORTS
June 17, 1993
CHANGES OF NOTE On Tuesday, the summer bait restrictions went into effect on the Conowingo Dam catwalk. Only worms (excluding bloodworms), chicken livers, dough baits and prepared scent baits will be allowed until Sept. 15. Artificial lures and other baits are permitted from the shoreline, but boats will not be allowed to fish the river between the dam and the power lines that cross the river at Rowland Island.The bait and access restrictions are in effect to protect the striped bass in the area.
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