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By JAMES BOCK | August 6, 1995
Sixty years ago, for the first time, black Baltimore made a thorough study of itself.The landmark work, "The Negro Community of Baltimore," was sponsored by the Baltimore Urban League, paid for by a white millionaire, A. E. O. Munsell, and written by a black sociologist, Ira De A. Reid. It is now almost forgotten.But the 1935 report merits another look. It is one measure of how much blacks' status in Baltimore has changed over six decades and how much it hasn't.The rapid growth of Baltimore's black community -- and its segregation in ghettos -- began in earnest in the 1920s.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
An African-American woman is alleging she was fired from the Baltimore Inner Harbor Hooters' restaurant for having an "unnatural" hair color, according to a complaint filed with Maryland Commission on Civil Rights. Farryn Johnson, 25, claims her supervisors said her blond highlights violated the appearance policy for "Hooters Girls," according to her attorney, Jessica P. Weber of Brown, Goldstein & Levy LLP. When Johnson pointed out that other waitresses had obviously dyed hair -- an Asian-American woman had bright red hair and a white woman had black hair with platinum highlights -- her supervisors said her hair was "not natural" because she was African-American, according to the complaint.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2004
Coppin State University unveiled yesterday The State of Black Baltimore, a 329-page collection of essays exploring issues such as the city's foundering school system, drug abuse, Ebonics and alleged discrimination in the city Police Department. The book is a collaboration between Coppin State and the Greater Urban League of Baltimore. Written primarily by university professors and local experts, the book includes contributions from prominent black Baltimoreans such as civil rights activist and former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Hundreds of protesters marched through downtown Baltimore on Monday evening to express outrage over the Trayvon Martin case but also to use the teen as a symbol of systemic issues facing the black community in the city and around the country. Several hundred protesters gathered in McKeldin Square next to the Inner Harbor before marching seven blocks to City Hall, shutting down streets during rush-hour traffic. It was the second day of protests in Baltimore after a Florida jury found George Zimmerman not guilty in Martin's death after a trial that captured national attention.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2001
The purpose of the day could have been summed up in the opening song -- a choir's soulful rendition of "We Shall Overcome." Instead of singing "some day" at the end of that phrase, the choir and crowd sang "We shall overcome today." About 350 people gathered at Coppin State College's James Weldon Johnson auditorium yesterday to discuss concerns in Baltimore's African-American community. But instead of just talking about the problems, those convened were determined that, at the end of the day, plans would be in place to solve them.
NEWS
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1997
Flipping through faded issues of "The First Colored Directory of Baltimore City" is a trip back in time.Back to a time of segregation, "race men" and "the Talented Tenth," a time when Thurgood Marshall, then just another lawyer with a downtown office, could take out a small ad for his services."
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | March 24, 1992
FROM time to time, Glimpses has described the city's old Chinese restaurants, its Italian restaurants and many of the Jewish delicatessens that used to dot the East Baltimore landscape.Black restaurants are a different category because until the late 1950s and early 1960s, the city's blacks had no choice but to patronize their own eateries if they wanted to eat out. Jim Crow kept them out of white establishments.That, of course, has changed, but it didn't change so long ago that even middle-aged Baltimoreans have forgotten . . .Sess's, at 1639 Division St., between Druid Hill and Pennsylvania avenues, was the most popular black eatery for many years.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
Louis C. Fields steers his car through the Baltimore neighborhood, passing public housing projects, boarded-up rowhouses, mountains of demolished rubble and signs warning "No Loitering By Order of the Police."Others may see a depressing -- and depressingly common -- cityscape. Fields squints a little, dreams a little and sees flocks of tourists drawn to the once and future soul of black Baltimore."Thurgood Marshall actually lived here," he says in amazement, pointing to the rowhouse on Division Street.
NEWS
March 27, 2005
ROSEDALE Pedestrian, 73, fatally injured walking on Pulaski Highway A man walking on the shoulder of Pulaski Highway was struck by a car and killed yesterday morning, Baltimore County police said. Lynwood Freeman, 73, of the 7900 block of Pulaski Highway was walking east of Batavia Farm Road about 9 a.m. when he was hit, police said. According to police, Freeman was walking east on the westbound shoulder when he was struck. No charges have been filed against the driver of the 1996 Oldsmobile, but police said the case will be submitted to the Baltimore County state's attorney's office for review.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2002
An organization that represents black Baltimore firefighters installed its first female president last night - a paramedic and 14-year veteran of the department. Sheri J. Luck, who had served as first vice president of the Vulcan Blazers for the past four years, said she wants the organization to be "more aggressive" in its efforts to obtain "equality within the department." The Vulcan Blazers was founded in 1970 and represents about 400 black Baltimore firefighters. The organization in recent years has lobbied for the hiring and promotion of minorities within the department's ranks.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 31, 2013
Last week I wrote about a young community organizer named Dayvon Love. Mr. Love and his fellow activists in Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, a grassroots advocacy organization he cofounded, may be the city's strongest proponents of black empowerment. Baltimore is majority African-American, but the heads of its most influential nonprofit organizations are usually white. Race still plays a role in which voices gain access to media outlets, policymakers and funding. So in LBS' view, if their goal is to help predominantly African-American communities, white nonprofit leaders must redress this power imbalance and do whatever they can to support a social policy agenda that is shaped and led by black people.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 1, 2009
A large, framed poster from 1943 hangs on the wall of Hermione C. "Hermie" Graham's Columbia home. It features a young African-American woman sitting at a telephone switchboard busily routing incoming and outgoing phone calls through a plug board. It is one of Graham's prized family treasures. The young woman on the poster with the perfectly coiffed hair and carefully pressed summer dress is Albertine Hinkson Graham, Hermie's mother, who died this month at age 94. The poster recalls a long-forgotten stop on the road to equality that happened in Baltimore more than 65 years ago. Albertine Graham, the daughter of a Pennsylvania Railroad redcap who worked at Penn Station and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2009
theater 'Fabulation': Though Fabulation is written by Lynn Nottage, author of Intimate Apparel, this satiric comedy about an upwardly mobile black woman who gets her comeuppance couldn't be more different in tone. Once the title character becomes bankrupt and pregnant, the story couldn't be more timely. See Fabulation or, The Re-Education of Undine, through March 8 at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. Tickets are $15-$60. Call 410-332-0033 or go to centerstage.org. Mary Carole McCauley history A slice of black Baltimore: Baltimore historian and author Philip J. Merrill shares his vast collection of African-American artifacts and memorabilia in A Slice of Historic Black Baltimore, an exhibit on display through March 1 at the Top of the World Observation Level, on the 27th floor of Baltimore's World Trade Center, 401 E. Pratt St. Merrill's exhibit highlights Baltimore residents, churches, schools and entertainment spots.
NEWS
December 5, 2008
Preserving stories of black Baltimore The editorial concerning the importance of preserving the stories of ordinary Americans struck home with me ("Listen up," Nov. 28). And indeed, on the very day that we elected Barack Obama to be our next president, an exhibition opened at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture in Baltimore featuring a one-hour monologue by a 75-year-old grandson of slaves named James Emory Bond, reminiscing about his years of growing up in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
They voted when they had to pay a poll tax for the privilege, sat in the back of buses, chopped wood to heat segregated schools and stayed indoors at night when the Ku Klux Klan was in town. America's older black voters - who grew up under the doctrine of "separate but equal," came of age during the civil rights movement and this week saw an African-American elected president of the country that once deemed them less than full citizens - said yesterday that they could not believe what they had witnessed.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN REPORTER | August 13, 2007
It was a hot Sunday afternoon, and City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. was standing on a platform in front of a South Baltimore crowd, pounding away at the theme of diversity. "That's what this city is about," the mayoral candidate boomed into the microphone. "Our diversity. That's what this campaign is about. Diversity." For this predominantly black city - where race subtly imbues every aspect of politics - the message of inclusion clearly struck a chord with the sea of largely white faces in the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2009
theater 'Fabulation': Though Fabulation is written by Lynn Nottage, author of Intimate Apparel, this satiric comedy about an upwardly mobile black woman who gets her comeuppance couldn't be more different in tone. Once the title character becomes bankrupt and pregnant, the story couldn't be more timely. See Fabulation or, The Re-Education of Undine, through March 8 at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. Tickets are $15-$60. Call 410-332-0033 or go to centerstage.org. Mary Carole McCauley history A slice of black Baltimore: Baltimore historian and author Philip J. Merrill shares his vast collection of African-American artifacts and memorabilia in A Slice of Historic Black Baltimore, an exhibit on display through March 1 at the Top of the World Observation Level, on the 27th floor of Baltimore's World Trade Center, 401 E. Pratt St. Merrill's exhibit highlights Baltimore residents, churches, schools and entertainment spots.
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin | June 20, 1993
TCAnn Marie Scott to pursue N.M. passion in 'retirement'Nineteen years ago this summer, Ann Marie Scott took a trip west with some other Baltimore County teachers. It changed her life."I fell in love with New Mexico," Ms. Scott says. "The stars were big and bright. The air was so crisp and clean and smelled so good. I said then I'm going to move out here when I retire."Now the time has come. Ms. Scott, 50, librarian at Parkville High School, is retiring after 26 years in county schools. In September, she will move out of her Timonium apartment and set a course west to the Land of Enchantment.
NEWS
By Thomas E. Noel and Charles M. Christian | December 24, 2006
Young black men in our communities are falling into a deep hole - a hole filled with crime, unemployment and despair. They are falling so far, and so fast, that extricating many of them might well be impossible. And yet, for their sakes and ours, we must try. Our personal lives and our many years spent as a Circuit Court judge and college professor, respectively, have caused us to question the destiny of the black community - particularly that of the black male. In December 2004 we independently published articles in a book titled The State of Black Baltimore.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 7, 2005
James Hamlin still sees Pennsylvania Avenue in all its tumultuous splendor. This makes him a great visionary, or a sentimental dreamer. Or both. In his mind's eye, a kid named Little Stevie Wonder's opening at the Royal Theatre. The Temptations are strolling down the street, and the Four Tops are pausing to get their shoes shined, and Redd Foxx is still showing up to convulse audiences with laughter. Pennsylvania Avenue is in West Baltimore. Hamlin lives in Sykesville. That's some long-distance vision he has. He is 57 years old and left West Baltimore back in 1976.
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