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By Linda Lowe Morris | October 14, 1990
It's a mistake to say art is only for the eyes. At least that's the way it seems at the new Artworks gallery on West Franklin Street. Here the works that line the walls are so vibrant they seem to touch all of the senses.You can hear the music rolling out of "The Sugar Shack," by Ernie Barnes, and maybe feel the floor shake a little. You hear the cicadas, feel and smell the hot tropical air coming off of "Disagreement," by Ugandan artist Paul Nzalamba. You squirm as you eavesdrop on "The Snuff Dippers," by Varnett Honeywood.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Vic Carter's spacious Howard County home is filled with more than 300 original paintings, small sculptures and figurines by black artists - and every single one has a story that the gregarious WJZ news anchor is eager to tell. This one, Carter said, pointing to an impressionistic painting of a young girl, the artist painted upside down - as the topsy-turvy signature attests. A small metal statue of a horse stood on his grandfather's desk when Carter, now in his 50s, was a boy. And a wall across from a staircase features a colorful canvas depicting Shango, the Yoruban deity of fire, lightning and thunder.
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By Lisa Troshinsky and Lisa Troshinsky,Special to The Sun | February 3, 2008
In 1995, Glenda and Milton Boone took on a new mission: to promote art by African-Americans. They rented the basement of a local church in downtown Baltimore, displayed the work of six visual artists and drew a crowd of about 300. What was then a little-known, grass-roots effort has since ballooned into a large African-American celebratory event in the Mid-Atlantic during Black History Month, drawing 46,000 attendees, according to its founders....
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By Edward Gunts | February 5, 2009
Artists and craftspeople from around the country will gather at the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend for the 14th annual Black Heritage Art Show, which celebrates African-American culture in a wide range of expressions. Since it began in the Fellowship Hall of Baltimore's New Psalmist Baptist Church in 1995, when six artists attracted several hundred patrons, the event has grown into a three-day event that draws thousands of visitors and showcases more than 100 visual, literary and performing artists, including musicians, poets, dancers and fashion designers.
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By New York Daily News | July 31, 1994
The first tour of its kind, "Black Paris, Plus . . ." follows the Harlem Renaissance trail into the haunts of America's expatriate black artists and writers."
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 10, 1995
If you didn't know that February is black history month, you would get a clue from the number of art shows dealing with the black experience currently on view.From the top floor of the Baltimore International Culinary College to the basement of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, Baltimore is abloom. But all is not equal here -- a sampling of four of these shows revealed widely differing degrees of success.Angela Franklin, a Baltimore artist, had a good idea for "Abstract in Black" at School 33. It was to be a show of African-American artists who work in non-representative ways, because, says Franklin, "no longer can the responsibility of creating solely representational images which chronicle the 'black experience' be placed upon the backs of African-American artists."
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 21, 2002
The black historical experience in the United States is a vital part of this country's experience from its beginnings," wrote the black historian Benjamin Quarles. "Would America have been America without her Negro people?" Quarles, who died in 1996 after a long career as a professor of history at Morgan State University, believed along with his great predecessor W.E.B. DuBois that African-Americans, through their own efforts, had woven themselves "into the very warp and woof of this nation.
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By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
Regional artists Denee Barr and Arnold Hurley get their moment in the spotlight during February, thanks in part to Black History Month. This month is the first time in years that Columbia's Slayton House Gallery has sponsored an exhibit by black artists. For Barr, a 38-year-old fine-arts photographer who lives in Columbia, participating in the show gives her another opportunity to show a series of unique photographs, which are printed on handmade paper that has been brushed with emulsion and then swabbed with splashes of color.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1998
In the 1920s, Harlem on New York's Upper West Side was the "Negro Capital of the World." The migration of hundreds of thousands of Southern rural blacks to Northern cities in the first decades of the century had made Harlem the largest black community in the nation.In the Roaring '20s it was the scene of an incredible outpouring of artistic, literary and musical creativity that would be remembered as the Harlem Renaissance.Black writers such as Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston and Countee Cullen produced plays, poems and novels celebrating the "New Negro" who was emerging in the city - urbane, politically aware and relentlessly modern.
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By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2000
African-American artists know this for sure: Their phones will start ringing furiously toward the end of December, when gallery owners, schools, libraries, museums and other cultural institutions begin scheduling their annual tributes to the heritage of black Americans. But many black artists say they're tired of being lauded for one short month and ignored the rest of the year. Many are increasingly unwilling to exhibit during the month of February, as a form of protest. "Black History Month is like a broke-down carousel for black artists," says Leslie King-Hammond, an artist and the dean of graduate studies at the Maryland Institute, College of Art. "As soon as the month ends, we cease to exist.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
The picture captures a refreshing image of tenderness. There's Barack Obama, moments after delivering his acceptance speech for president of the United States. His arm is wrapped around the waist of his wife, soon-to-be first lady Michelle. Their eyes are closed as he gently kisses the tip of her nose. Her smile brightens the profile shot of the two. Sadly, it's an image of a powerful and loving black couple that is rarely, if ever, seen in today's mainstream or black pop culture. In the past few days, there has been much talk about the overwhelming emotionality of Obama's historic win and the social and political changes it could bring.
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By Lisa Troshinsky and Lisa Troshinsky,Special to The Sun | February 3, 2008
In 1995, Glenda and Milton Boone took on a new mission: to promote art by African-Americans. They rented the basement of a local church in downtown Baltimore, displayed the work of six visual artists and drew a crowd of about 300. What was then a little-known, grass-roots effort has since ballooned into a large African-American celebratory event in the Mid-Atlantic during Black History Month, drawing 46,000 attendees, according to its founders....
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By Nicole Fuller and Ruma Kumar and Nicole Fuller and Ruma Kumar,SUN REPORTERS | January 19, 2008
A painted mural of an African-American man breaking free from bondage, deemed inappropriate for the Anne Arundel County government headquarters by County Executive John R. Leopold, has found a home. Officials from the nonprofit organization seeking to display the mural said yesterday that it would be hung on a state government building in downtown Annapolis - steps away from the original intended location. In a meeting yesterday with House Speaker Michael E. Busch and state Sen. John C. Astle of Anne Arundel County, ArtWalk officials finalized plans to mount the artwork late next month on the Attman Glazer Building, overlooking the city's historic African-American community.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 8, 2006
If African-Americans don't buy artworks by African-American artists, who will? A decade ago, that question prompted a group of black collectors in Washington to join together to share their knowledge and experience. They wanted to create a forum where they could discuss African-American art, make group visits to artists' studios and find ways to support local artists, dealers and visual arts programs. The fruits of their efforts are on display this month in Holding Our Own, a lovely exhibition of African-American artworks owned by members of the Collectors Club of Washington at the University of Maryland University College in Adelphi.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | June 7, 2006
Henry Ossawa Tanner, whose large and varied body of work, including landscapes, portraits and atmospheric images of religious subjects, made him the first African-American artist to win an international reputation, inspired a generation of black artists to pursue professional careers. But the artists who took up Tanner's mantle did not necessarily adopt the master's painting style or his ideas about the artist's role in society. They were products of a new century, with a new outlook oriented toward modernity and the unprecedented social conditions it had created.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | March 29, 2006
Contemporary art by African-Americans, like that of other contemporary artists, is all over the place at the moment, both geographically and stylistically. Important recent shows have included Sam Gilliam in Washington, Kara Walker and Roy DeCarava in New York, and the quilters of Gee's Bend, Ala., at Atlanta's High Museum of Art. Riffs and Rhythms: Abstract Forms / Lived Realities, on view at the James E. Lewis Museum of Art on the campus of Morgan State University, surveys a group of six regional contemporary artists who have worked in nonrepresentational styles for many years and whose efforts likewise deserve wider recognition.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 1, 1999
Hearing the words of actor Ossie Davis alone would be enough to justify seeing "I'll Make Me a World: a Century of African-American Arts," starting tonight on PBS."Art was at one time the only voice we had to declare our humanity," says Davis, one of the first voices heard in this six-hour documentary series on the history of black artists in 20th century America."When we were described as barely above cattle, certainly not human, it was our art that we had to show the rest of the world that possibly we were humans.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Vic Carter's spacious Howard County home is filled with more than 300 original paintings, small sculptures and figurines by black artists - and every single one has a story that the gregarious WJZ news anchor is eager to tell. This one, Carter said, pointing to an impressionistic painting of a young girl, the artist painted upside down - as the topsy-turvy signature attests. A small metal statue of a horse stood on his grandfather's desk when Carter, now in his 50s, was a boy. And a wall across from a staircase features a colorful canvas depicting Shango, the Yoruban deity of fire, lightning and thunder.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | December 4, 2005
When the doves appeared, Stacey Roberts couldn't possibly have known that she was embarking on a journey that would lead her to identify a celebrated 19th-century painter's forgotten artwork - and a family history full of surprises. Last March, as Roberts' beloved Great-Aunt Lucy lay dying in a Baltimore hospital, she asked Roberts to promise one thing: that she'd go to her aunt's home to find a painting - and keep it safe. Roberts didn't know it at the time, but what her aunt called "the painting" was in fact a rare opaque watercolor by Henry Ossawa Tanner, the most famous African-American artist of the 19th century.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 28, 2005
One of the underappreciated treasures of the Washington-area arts scene is the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, tucked away in a quiet wooded area in the city's southeast quadrant. Over the years, the Anacostia Museum has presented many important exhibitions of African-American art by local and nationally recognized artists. Through Oct. 16, the museum is displaying Walls of Heritage, Walls of Pride: African American Murals, an exhibition of African-American mural painting.
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