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NEWS
By David Zurawik and Mary Carole McCauley and David Zurawik and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
In movies and on television, white is black. And black is now white. African-American actor Ving Rhames, in a revival of the 1970s TV detective series Kojak, premiering tonight on the USA Network, has the role once played by the Greek-American actor Telly Savalas. And in film, white actor Ashton Kutcher is reprising the part of the fiance played by Sidney Poitier in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner. The remake, which opens today, is called Guess Who. The pattern extends beyond the big and small screens, with James Earl Jones and Leslie Uggams about to open in a Broadway revival of On Golden Pond in roles originally played by Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn, while Denzel Washington portrays Brutus just down the street at the Belasco Theater in Julius Caesar.
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FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
Pulitzer-winning author David Shipler spent five years traveling the country to talk to black and white Americans about their perceptions of one another, visiting places that bring blacks and whites into daily contact -- schools, colleges, military bases, police departments, corporations.His conclusion:Racial prejudice remains ever insidious, often unconscious. Many right-minded Americans have deep-rooted racial prejudices they've never considered until they sit down to discuss them.A former reporter for the New York Times, Shipler is the author of the 1983 "Russia: Broken Idols, Shattered Dreams" and "Arab and Jew: Wounded Spirits in a Promised Land," which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1987.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
Sunday was Little League Day at Oriole Park for the New Windsor Cubs. Forgive the fans if they didn't recognize the undefeated team from 1954. Instead of gangly kids in baggy uniforms, they were gray-haired granddads in matching T-shirts. On the front of the shirts: CUBS FOREVER. Fifty years after this Carroll County team won a pennant on its first try, the players still flock for reunions from places like Wyoming and North Carolina. Three still have their Little League uniforms, neatly folded and tucked away.
NEWS
By This article was reported by Sun staff writers Dan Fesperman, Ivan Penn, Lisa Respers and Craig Timberg and written by Fesperman | January 18, 1998
It would seem to be the simplest of stories. A politician gets caught making money in ways that he shouldn't, then his embarrassed colleagues vote to expel him.But when the politician is black and the powers that oust him are mostly white, simple things can get complicated in a hurry.Whether out of genuine anguish or political opportunism, supporters of ousted state Sen. Larry Young tapped into old, deep channels of black pain and mistrust when they rose to Young's defense last week by invoking the most divisive theme in American culture: race.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 30, 1996
Prime-time network television is not the place you might expect to find a serious discussion of race -- especially during a season drowning in sitcoms about young friends.But, contrary to notions of network entertainment as essential mindlessness, an informed and highly charged discourse on ethnicity, power and race is now taking place every weeknight on ABC, CBS, NBC and even Fox.To an extent without precedent, millions of Americans are bearing witness nightly to symbolic representations of some of their deepest feelings on one of the deepest issues in the national psyche.
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | December 19, 2006
City officials in Vidor, Texas, screamed foul when news broke that their town was once one of America's notorious "sundown towns" for blacks. In the segregation era, that was the town fathers' not-so-discreet way of warning black people that they would be jailed, assaulted or worse if they were caught in town after dark. Vidor officials vehemently insisted that they have long since disavowed that naked, in-your-face racism. They contend that the press latched onto the town's woeful past to grab cheap, sensationalist headlines.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | January 12, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The new South Africa arrived last week at Orange Grove Primary School, a formerly all-white facility in the heart of a lower middle-class white community.The school, which closed its doors in 1990 because whites didn't need it and didn't want blacks to use it, reopened Wednesday as one of the first public schools in South Africa where enrollment is not based on race. White parents in the neighborhood are not sending their children to the school yet, but school officials say the community has raised no objections to black students attending school in the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2000
To many, Annapolis in the 1800s was a town with grand Georgian mansions, white property owners and black slaves. But a few months ago, amateur historian Janice Williams made an interesting discovery while researching the history of an African-American church in Annapolis: John Wheeler, a free black, owned land at 176 Main St. in 1803. The finding stunned Williams and her research partner, Joan Scurlock. "You don't really think that there were black people walking around town, running businesses" in the early 1800s, said Scurlock, 57, a retired federal employee who lives in Annapolis.
FEATURES
December 16, 1998
Meet Eddie GeorgeThe Tennessee Oilers are a team to be feared, and Eddie George is the reason. In only three seasons, Eddie has become one of the NFL's top running backs. "He's just too tough to handle," says Oiler tight end Frank Wycheck.Eddie is an explosive runner. In 1997, he rushed for 1,399 yards on 357 carries.At Ohio State University, Eddie was outstanding, too.In 1995, Eddie won the Heisman Trophy as the best player in college football.SPORTS FUNNIESQ. What is the pig's best karate move?
NEWS
January 18, 1994
Jesse Jackson has been taking an unusual amount of heat from his fellow African-Americans recently because he has identified black-on-black crime as a major problem in poor communities. The reaction reminds us of the incredulity that greeted the little boy's observations concerning the emperor's new clothes. Isn't it obvious that blacks are the primary victims of crime in poor neighborhoods, and that the brunt of the suffering inflicted by black criminals is borne by other blacks?In a society with a less troubled racial history than ours, these would be self-evident statements.
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