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By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The chairmen of the Congressional Black and Hispanic caucuses yesterday denounced a House Republican move to strip the budgets and staffs of the caucuses as an attempt to muffle voices certain to be critical of many items on the Republican agenda."
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NEWS
March 2, 2014
For most of his first term in office, President Barack Obama tended to play down race as a factor in his policy decisions. "I'm not the president of black America," he once said, "I'm the president of the United States of America. " That unifying message was one he continually returned to in his efforts to heal the country's wounded economy during his first years in office, and as the nation's first black president he sometimes even seemed to go out of his way to avoid charges of racial favoritism.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A unanimous Supreme Court gave black and Hispanic voters strong new assurances yesterday that they can expect to dominate the outcome of some elections for seats in state legislatures and local governing bodies.In one 9-0 ruling and in a separate order that drew no dissent, the court indicated clearly that minority voters whose votes have been diluted when election districts were carved out in the past are to be given a much better chance through redistricting to have candidates of their choice elected.
NEWS
November 12, 2012
In a recent editorial you write that "any party that so ignores the interests of Hispanics, blacks, women and young people doesn't have a bright future" ("Diversity and the GOP," Nov. 8). I suppose that the key is determining what those interests are. If their interests are jobs, poverty and wealth accumulation, the election results suggest that the Democratic Party (or at least its presidential candidate) can ignore those interests and do just fine. At some point, this president is going to have to accept some responsibility for the high percentage of black and Latino unemployment, the high percentage of blacks and Latinos living in poverty and the decline in wealth of African-Americans and Latinos.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- Far fewer black and Hispanic students will enroll as freshmen at the University of California's most prestigious schools this fall, although their numbers will drop only slightly throughout the state system and some campuses will experience an increase, officials said yesterday.The freshmen class of 1998 is the first to be admitted since California banned consideration of race in college admissions in 1996.The release of the new figures comes seven weeks after an announcement that minority applications at Berkeley and Los Angeles had dropped sharply.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Young Americans are deeply pessimistic about the state of race relations and divided along racial lines over what to do about the problem, a new survey shows.The survey, conducted for People for the American Way, a liberal civil rights group based here, found that 50 percent of American young people interviewed said the state of race relations in the United States were "generally bad."It also found that youths of different races disagreed greatly on issues like affirmative action.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 29, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Studies about the state of education in America remind me of high school. That's a major reason why I hate reading studies about education in America. Nevertheless, one intriguing new study has caught my attention and won't let go. It tries to explain the gaping test score gaps among black, white, Asian and Latino students. The puzzle is, why do white and Asian students tend to cluster on the high side of the gap and blacks and Latinos on the low side? For years conventional wisdom has blamed the gap on poorly performing inner-city schools.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A University of Texas law professor has come under heavy fire from black and Latino legislators for making statements that give aid and comfort to racists. Unfortunately, his critics are making statements that risk doing the same thing.Professor Lino Graglia's remarks came in a news conference for an organization that supports the 1996 federal court decision that stopped Texas colleges from considering race in student admissions.Since then, black and Hispanic enrollment at the University of Texas Law School has plummeted from the highest in the nation to one of the lowest.
NEWS
May 4, 2007
Alabama legislators refused to debate and vote on a bill that would have granted the power to impose death sentences to juries, not elected judges. Alabama's approach to the death penalty is broken on so many levels that it's hard to single out one flaw as being worse than the others. But certainly one of the worst aspects, and one that's pretty much peculiar to Alabama, is a law allowing judges to impose death sentences even when juries recommend against it. This provision of the law puts the awesome power of life and death into the hands of elected judges who are subject to political pressure and can't afford to be labeled soft on crime.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1995
More than four decades after the U.S. Supreme Court first decreed that "separate but equal" education for blacks and whites was inherently unequal, public universities in the nation's Southern and border states remain largely segregated by race, a new report contends.The report, "Redeeming the American Promise," was released in Washington by the Southern Education Foundation yesterday, the 41st anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision in the Brown vs. Board of Education case.The report calls for a dramatic overhaul of American education, from first grade on, with close attention to how black students are tracked.
NEWS
By Stephanie A. Flores-Koulish | October 4, 2012
This weekend, an hour and a half north of Baltimore in Carlisle, Pa., a group of experts will convene for a symposium on the first federally operated Native American boarding school in the U.S. The lessons learned from this piece of U.S. history still resonate today when we think about current federal education policies and practices. I teach a graduate course on the history of education to local teachers at Loyola University Maryland, and we spend a good deal of time learning about this historical phenomenon.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2010
Towson University and the University of Maryland Baltimore County are national leaders in graduating black and Hispanic students at similar rates to their white peers, according to studies released this week by the Education Trust. Towson was one of 11 institutions hailed by the Education Trust, a nonprofit group that works to lower the achievement gaps for minority students, for maintaining low graduation gaps for both black and Hispanic students. At Towson, 69.6 percent of Hispanic students graduated within six years for the classes that finished college between 2006 and 2008 compared with 66.7 percent of white students.
NEWS
By Walter A. Gill | April 23, 2009
There is a disconnect in the American education system. Blacks and Hispanics drop out of school in huge numbers, leading to high incarceration rates. Meanwhile, the schools impose a one-size-fits-all curriculum that envisions four-year college as a universal goal and marginalizes and minimizes alternative career paths. It's time to connect the dots. Real reform, especially in large urban school districts, cannot occur until we recognize the reality that many students will not attend a four-year college - and provide alternative avenues to success for those students.
NEWS
May 4, 2007
Alabama legislators refused to debate and vote on a bill that would have granted the power to impose death sentences to juries, not elected judges. Alabama's approach to the death penalty is broken on so many levels that it's hard to single out one flaw as being worse than the others. But certainly one of the worst aspects, and one that's pretty much peculiar to Alabama, is a law allowing judges to impose death sentences even when juries recommend against it. This provision of the law puts the awesome power of life and death into the hands of elected judges who are subject to political pressure and can't afford to be labeled soft on crime.
NEWS
By Paul Rogat Loeb | March 18, 2007
They just wanted to protect the sanctity of the vote. That's the Bush administration's pious explanation for firing eight U.S. attorneys who were Republican enough for President Bush to have appointed them in the first place. "The president recalls hearing complaints about election fraud not being vigorously prosecuted and believes he may have informally mentioned it to the attorney general," explained White House spokeswoman Dana Perino. How could you question such a laudable goal? Of course, the justifications keep shifting, as with the Iraqi war. First it was the general performance of the prosecutors.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2006
All the growth in home sales in the Baltimore region last year - the last hurrah of the housing boom - was driven by minority buyers, new numbers suggest. Mortgage loans to minorities rose nearly 25 percent in 2005 compared with the year before, while loans to whites dropped about 3 percent, according to a report released yesterday by Genworth Mortgage Insurance Corp. and Compliance Technologies Inc. It uses the most recent Home Mortgage Disclosure Act statistics for first lien home-purchase loans - not refinancing or second mortgages.
NEWS
September 24, 1997
ONE WOULD think a son of Italian immigrants would understand what it means to be stereotyped. Not too many years ago, Italian Americans in parts of the Deep South had to fear a lynch mob almost as much as a black person did. Yet an Italian American, a distinguished law professor at the University of Texas, put such sensitivities aside in assessing the academic abilities of African-American and Hispanic students.Swiping all with the same broad brush, Lino Graglia said, ''Blacks and Mexican-Americans are not academically competitive with whites in selective institutions.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 6, 1995
Washington. -- The Supreme Court's recent rollbacks in civil rights have provoked black and Hispanic leaders into what many are calling an eleventh-hour response. To me, it looks more like half-past midnight.The high court's decision to eliminate race as the ''predominant factor'' in drawing legislative districts ended a session that also saw sharp limits on federal contract set-asides, limits on school-desegregation efforts and the allowance of a lower-court decision to dismantle a University of Maryland scholarship program for minorities.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
IN HIS best-selling little book All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, Robert Fulghum listed the things children learn in their first year of formal schooling: Hold hands and stick together, play fair, clean up your own mess, don't take stuff that isn't yours. All important things. But these days children have to learn how to read in kindergarten. And in Montgomery County they're demonstrating how to do it. Last week, the folks in Rockville announced that the percentage of kindergarten children who can read a simple story doubled from 2000 to last year.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 29, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Studies about the state of education in America remind me of high school. That's a major reason why I hate reading studies about education in America. Nevertheless, one intriguing new study has caught my attention and won't let go. It tries to explain the gaping test score gaps among black, white, Asian and Latino students. The puzzle is, why do white and Asian students tend to cluster on the high side of the gap and blacks and Latinos on the low side? For years conventional wisdom has blamed the gap on poorly performing inner-city schools.
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