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By PETER A. JAY | June 30, 1994
Havre de Grace -- Unscrambling the torrent of confused messages emanating from the movement led by Louis Farrakhan isn't easy, but in the wake of his visit to Baltimore the effort needs to be made, and some hard distinctions need to be drawn.Like most charismatic leaders of mass movements, Mr. Farrakhan is a deliberate and intelligent polarizer. He draws his strength from division, not from unity. The fervor of his followers, those within the tent, is reinforced by the hostility displayed toward him by those without.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 9, 2013
Seldom does the death of a foreign leader touch the hearts and minds of Americans as did the passing at age 95 of Nelson Mandela, who suffered, struggled and eventually led South Africa out of the scourge of racial apartheid and became, almost miraculously, its president. He rose to prominence in his embattled country and eventually throughout the world as the central figure in the fight for racial and human justice after 27 years of harsh imprisonment on a desolate island redoubt.
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FEATURES
By Kasey Jones and Kasey Jones,Kasey Jones is an editor at The Sun | February 11, 1992
Alex Haley, through his epic novel "Roots: The Saga of an American Family," showed black Americans that there is no shame in being descendants of slaves.Rather, black Americans should be proud that their ancestors survived being kidnapped from their homes, shipped across oceans like so much cargo, separated from families, to win their freedom and rights in the country that made it legal to keep them slaves.Mr. Haley, who died of a heart attack yesterday at age 70, brought to life his own personal history that he first came to know from stories by his grandmother and great-aunts.
NEWS
By J.B. Salganik | October 15, 2013
While it saddened me to read recently of the attendance troubles at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, I was not surprised. In a city where museums generally exceed expectations, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum has always left something to be desired. As a high school history teacher in Baltimore City public schools, I have never wanted to take my students there because I know intuitively they would hate it. While I understand the impulse to showcase African Americans' social and economic high achievers, this positivist approach obscures the scope of what black Americans have overcome in the past and the challenges they still face today.
TOPIC
By John McWhorter | February 11, 2001
IT IS A MANTRA among black Americans that we are insufficiently aware of our history, that our advancement will be hobbled until we are all rooted in a sense of continuity with the past. Yet every year we are regaled with not just a Black History Day but a Black History Month. Over four weeks in February, the media, museums, colleges and universities, and others trot out the usual procession of black pioneers, with blown-up photos of Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Tubman and Jesse Jackson festooning libraries and churches.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | June 15, 2008
Would the election of Barack Obama as president of the United States prove that racism is dead? Of course not. An Obama victory would merely serve as symbolic confirmation of what we already know: Over the past several decades, racism has been beaten back and severely diminished. It isn't dead, but it is dying. An Obama victory would also serve as a potent reminder of something else we already know: While race may once have automatically determined everything from life expectancy to job prospects, it doesn't any longer.
FEATURES
By Kasey Jones and Kasey Jones,Kasey Jones is an editor at The Sun | February 11, 1992
ALEX HALEY, through his epic novel "Roots: The Saga of an American Family," showed black Americans that there is no shame in being descendants of slaves.Rather, black Americans should be proud that their ancestors survived being kidnapped from their homes, shipped across oceans like so much cargo, separated from families, to win their freedom and rights in the country that made it legal to keep them slaves.Mr. Haley, who died of a heart attack yesterday at age 70, brought to life his own personal history that he first came to know from oral history.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | January 17, 2005
ATLANTA - The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the civil rights organization founded by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., is in its death throes, suffering a leadership crisis, financial woes and a freefall in membership. SCLC offers the most dramatic example of a civil rights organization in decline, but it is by no means the only one. The National Urban League doesn't command the respect it once did. The Congress of Racial Equality has been little more than a joke ever since its chairman, Roy Innis, started promoting the interests of African tyrants, starting with Idi Amin.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | January 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- At a time of economic despair for many black Americans, the civil rights and economic concerns of African Americans have been virtually ignored in the 1992 presidential race, according to a new report by the National Urban League.The civil rights group's 17th annual assessment of "The State of Black America," to be released today, concludes that problems in housing, the economy and education have deepened for black Americans, according to researchers who prepared it.The report aims its harshest criticism at the racial rhetoric of politicians and their lack of commitment to civil rights.
NEWS
January 28, 1992
Baltimore Del. Howard P. "Pete" Rawlings has introduced a bill in the General Assembly that would mandate use of the term "African American" in state laws and official documents that make reference to black Americans. Delegate Rawlings argues that "African American" is more appropriate than "black" because it refers to a particular ethnic origin rather than to color and because it reflects black Americans' growing awareness and acceptance of their African heritage.There has never been universal agreement on how to refer to descendants of people originally brought to this country from Africa as slaves -- an ambiguity that grew out of this country's painful legacy of racial oppression and discrimination.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 20, 2013
My fellow white people — many of us, maybe most of us — get really weird about the subject of race, especially when black people raise questions about the way they are treated. Reactions range from silence to white-hot vitriol to moderate unease to social-media snark. All of that was on display in the past week, after the verdict in the George Zimmerman case in Florida. Andy Harris, Maryland's lone Republican in Congress, said people who complained about Zimmerman's acquittal in the shooting of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin should "get over it. " With that dismissive comment, Harris spoke for all white Americans who dislike conversations about race and who wish black Americans would stop complaining about conditions and stop contriving racism.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Johns Hopkins University professor Nathan Connolly sees the Trayvon Martin case in terms far broader than the details of how the Florida teenager was shot and killed at the end of February. Look at the attempts by some to dismiss race as a potential factor in the shooting of the black teenager or to limit any discussion of racial motivation on the part of George Zimmerman, who has been charged in the killing, Connolly told a roomful of Hopkins students and professors who had gathered Thursday to discuss the fallout of the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
TV One will launch a series tonight that addresses the issue of missing Black Americans. S. Epatha Merkerson, Emmy-Award-winner and longtime member of the NBC's "Law & Order" cast, will host the 10-part reality series from the Silver-Spring-based cable channel. Here's the release from TV One: As the centerpiece of an effort to draw attention to and help find missing Black Americans, whose stories are largely ignored in national media coverage of missing persons, TV One will premiere Find Our Missing, a 10-episode, one-hour docu-drama series Wednesday, January 18 at 10 PM ET.   Hosted by Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning actress S. Epatha Merkerson, who for 16 years portrayed Police Lieutenant Anita Van Buren on NBC's Law & Order, Find Our Missing is designed to put names and faces to people of color who have disappeared without a trace.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2011
When she was a child growing up in Lothian, Lyndra Pratt loved spending time with her grandmother, Margaret Ann Easton, at Easton's nearby farm. Naturally, Pratt was curious about this woman she loved so dearly. What, she wondered, had her grandma's life been like? How had she become the way she was? "Who are your parents?" Pratt asked one day when she was 8. "Where did they come from?" Easton burst into tears. That was 48 years ago, long before Pratt, now Lyndra Pratt Marshall, realized black Americans of her grandmother's time rarely wanted to discuss their lineage.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | March 4, 2009
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Orioles center fielder Adam Jones is well aware he's the only African-American among the 73 players in camp at Fort Lauderdale Stadium - on a team that represents a predominantly black city - and he views it as both a sign of the times and a call to action. "It doesn't bother me," Jones said yesterday, "but I'd like to see more black athletes playing baseball." In that, at least, he isn't alone. Baseball commissioner Bud Selig has made it an industry priority to increase the number of African-American children involved in baseball, and Major League Baseball makes grants to supply equipment and build baseball fields in urban areas through the RBI (Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities)
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | June 15, 2008
Would the election of Barack Obama as president of the United States prove that racism is dead? Of course not. An Obama victory would merely serve as symbolic confirmation of what we already know: Over the past several decades, racism has been beaten back and severely diminished. It isn't dead, but it is dying. An Obama victory would also serve as a potent reminder of something else we already know: While race may once have automatically determined everything from life expectancy to job prospects, it doesn't any longer.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | October 29, 1992
For nine months this year, black public administrators in Baltimore and other U.S. cities served as mentors and hosts to black South Africans.The black Americans shared their experiences managing urban government agencies in the post-Civil Rights era. At least some of those experiences, it was believed, would prove useful when black South Africans move into positions of authority in the post-apartheid era.And what did the South Africans share? Among other things, they offered black Americans another perspective on our own talents.
NEWS
By FIKRE M. WORKNEH | January 28, 1992
For years, black Americans have been yearning for some sort of cultural and spiritual reunion with what they refer to as a ''motherland.'' Returning to Africa has been a never-ending passion and fascination as well as a dream that has never been fully realized.In the past, there have been many public discussions and plans to organize a major and symbolic pilgrimage to Africa. Some individuals have taken trips to the promised land, Africa, and returned to share their adventure and experience with others.
NEWS
By Gabe Heilig | May 23, 2008
Language is tricky, and this is never truer than in election years. Take the terms we use to describe ourselves. In my case, even though it's the box I check off on official forms, I'm clearly not "white." I'm pink, or some shade toward that end of the spectrum. And so are you, if you think you're "white." Fact is, other than albinos, I don't know anyone who is literally white. Do you? I often think we might resolve some of our racial bias if we referred to European-heritage Americans as "pinks" and African-heritage Americans as "browns."
NEWS
By CLARENCE JACKSON | December 4, 2007
I wasn't there, but I'm guessing that Sen. Barack Obama winced uncomfortably over at least one of comedian Chris Rock's jokes at a fundraiser for the Illinois Democrat in Harlem's historic Apollo Theater last week. Mr. Rock quipped that his mostly black audience would be "real embarrassed" if Mr. Obama won after they had supported New York Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton. "You'd say, `I had that white lady! What was I thinking,'" he said, according to Associated Press. That line might well have passed without much notice had it come amid the usual raunchy fare on late-night cable TV. But race is a particularly sensitive topic in the world of politics.
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