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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
About 1,000 Baltimore-area residents are expected to receive thousands of dollars each under a landmark $175 million settlement between the U.S. Department of Justice and Wells Fargo over accusations of discriminatory lending practices. Under the terms of the deal announced Thursday, Wells Fargo also will provide $7.5 million to the city of Baltimore, which federal officials credited with first raising issues of discrimination related to bank's subprime mortgages. The city alleged Wells Fargo steered minorities into subprime loans, gave them less favorable rates than white borrowers and foreclosed on hundreds of Baltimore homes, creating blight and higher public safety costs.
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NEWS
October 13, 2014
What are black voters' priorities? Your recent article on the candidates' appeal to black voters offered the result of Mr. Hogan's polling on North Avenue: People said they wanted lower taxes above all else ( "Hogan, Brown differ in message to black voters," Oct. 4). A successful governor needs to excel in many criteria. Mr. Brown was not asked how he would lessen tax burdens. Nor was he asked if he felt he deserves higher office after making Marylanders experience the failed Obamacare system.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2003
WHATEVER THE outcome of the trial in U.S. District Court on discrimination claims by public housing residents against the city and the federal government, the case has provided a fascinating look at the early development of low-income housing here -- and of Baltimore's inner city as well. The view comes courtesy of the reports and testimony of expert witnesses for both sides. The experts, like the plaintiffs and the defense, disagree on whether the city and the federal government have willfully perpetuated in recent times the racially segregated system they put in place six decades ago. But there is little dispute about how public housing developed in the years before the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court decision outlawed racial segregation -- and little doubt that the development influenced patterns of growth for years.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 5, 2014
Let us give Sean Groubert every benefit of the doubt. Let us assume he is a good person. Let us assume he is kind to children, well liked by neighbors. And by all means, let's assume he has a black friend. For good measure, let's assume he has two. Now, with those assumptions in force, let's ponder why Mr. Groubert, a white South Carolina state trooper, shot an unarmed black man last month at a gas station in Columbia. The incident has received less notice than did the shooting of Michael Brown, probably because the victim, 35-year-old Levar Jones, survived.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 19, 1997
We find ways anew to kill Kenneth Lee.In September of 1993, Lee's oldest son, Joel Lee, was killed during a robbery in Northeast Baltimore. The elder Lee -- a Korean immigrant -- probably died a little that day, as all relatives and friends of homicide victims do.Baltimore police arrested and charged Davon Neverdon in the slaying. In July of 1995, Neverdon was tried in Baltimore Circuit Court in Joel Lee's slaying. A predominantly black jury acquitted Neverdon, who is also black, eliciting charges of racial bias from Kenneth Lee and others.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 24, 1992
MITCHELLVILLE -- Oliver and Frances Henderson have all the suburban trappings a couple in their mid-30s might want: the five-bedroom, $250,000 brick home on a quiet Prince George's County cul-de-sac, the lush lawn, the two cars and the two careers to pay for it all.They're black, they're proud and they're prosperous. And they are not alone.According to newly released census figures, Maryland has the nation's most affluent and highly educated black population.Of all states that are at least 10 percent black or have a black population of more than 1 million, Maryland ranks No. 1 with a median black household income of $30,746.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 31, 2012
If you didn't get a chance to attend the recent Black and White Party, a fund-raiser for the Enoch Pratt Free Library, you can get a taste of the event at this Baltimore Sun photo gallery. The event, whose theme was "Evening in Paris," was organized by the Pratt Contemporaries, a group of young professional who support the library.  Here's another Pratt event worth attending: this Saturday's Booklovers' Breakfast with Michael Eric Dyson. It will be held at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, 700 Aliceanna St., from 8:30 a.m. to noon.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 13, 2011
Since Wiz Khalifa released his chart-topping Pittsburgh anthem "Black and Yellow," we have been treated to a bunch of remixes from rappers across the country who are repping their hometown teams, including Mullyman's Ravens-themed " Black and Purple . " Now Orioles fans have gotten their own anthem from Dboi Da Dome, E' From Da Wic and Jay Luv. We can all relate to "Orange and Black. " Well, except for the parts about drinking purple stuff and pulling out guns on non-Orioles fans.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen and Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Jacques Kelly and librarian Doris Carberry contributed to this article | November 20, 1994
In the early years of this century, when Cab Calloway was growing up in West Baltimore's Sugar Hill, the neighborhood his family called home was considered the political, cultural and business hub of black society.He was the son of middle-class professionals. His mother, Martha Eulalia Reed, was a Morgan State College graduate who taught school. His father, Cabell Calloway, graduated from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and worked as a lawyer.Young Cab Calloway even had his own car in high school -- a used 1923 Oldsmobile he'd bought with $275 he'd earned working -- a rarity in that era, particularly for a black man."
NEWS
October 30, 2010
HAGERSTOWN — The state Department of Natural Resources says Maryland's bear hunt is closed. Sixty-seven bears were killed as of 9 p.m. on Friday and the hunt was closed. The season began on Monday. The hunt was limited to Allegany and Garrett counties.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The summer may have ended, but pride season in Baltimore has not. The city's annual Baltimore Black Pride events kick off next week, including nights out on the town, parties for youth and cultural events. The week culminates on Sunday, Oct. 12 with a Fall Festival at Club Bunns on W. Lexington Avenue at 4 p.m. This year's events are the first to be thrown by The Center for Black Equity - Baltimore, the new name taken up this year by Baltimore Black Pride, Inc. The change brings the organization, which has been working in Baltimore for more than a decade, under the umbrella of the national Center for Black Equity.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Dealing with police can involve a delicate balance between knowing your rights and being respectful to officers. Both are crucial, seven lawyers told a church full of Baltimore's black youths and their parents. But when in doubt, attorney Douglas B. Evans said, "you have the right to shut up. " The panel of black attorneys answered questions about police brutality and racial profiling, amid other concerns during the seminar, Conscious Operations during Police Stops, or "C.O.P.S.," at the Empowerment Temple Church on Tuesday night.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
When Towson welcomes Maine to Johnny Unitas Stadium on Saturday night for the Colonial Athletic Association opener for both sides, the matchup will pit two of the three teams in last year's race for the conference title. But both programs are shades of what they were in 2013. The Tigers (2-2), who advanced to the Football Championship Subdivision title game, absorbed a stunning 31-27 loss to Central Connecticut State in their season opener and recently won back-to-back games ito climb back to .500.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The owners of two popular restaurants in downtown Baltimore have agreed to pay $1.3 million and establish new hiring measures to settle a years-old lawsuit alleging racial discrimination against black applicants and employees. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed the lawsuit in 2008 against McCormick & Schmick's Seafood Restaurants Inc. and Schmick Restaurant Corp., owners of McCormick & Schmick's and M&S Grill in the Inner Harbor. The lawsuit claimed the restaurants violated the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by refusing to hire black applicants for front-of-the-house positions such as servers and hostesses.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
I was most confused by the letter writer who seemed to object to the statue of Ravens legend Ray Lewis being given equal status to the one of Johnny Unitas ( "Statue of Ray Lewis is disgraceful," Sept. 8). After all, as the writer observed, Ray Lewis was found not guilty in a court of law. So what's the problem here? It's not like the Ravens put up a statue of Michael Vick, who was actually found guilty of a crime and has been "rehabilitated. " Yet this letter writer still chooses to be "outraged.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | October 3, 1993
This fall, chic women will leave showy displays of color to nature. Instead, they'll be enveloping themselves in black to capture attention. Black defines the fashion season, as it has in the past, but this time it is expressed in the richness of velvets, silks and soft wools rather than harsh biker textures such as leather and denim. And the only accessory that head-to-toe black requires is a deftly painted face.
NEWS
By KEN HAMBLIN | March 15, 1991
Denver. Like most Americans, black and white, I overflowed with pride at the way our soldiers brought Desert Storm to a successful conclusion.But my moment of pride was spoiled when I remembered the self-indulgent and often hostile voice of ghetto dissent during the war. Today some of those Afro-American leaders would like us to forget how they argued that no black would benefit by serving America in this war. Contemptibly, they quarreled that because blacks...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 29, 2014
A study of firearm assaults in six states, including Maryland, found that young males make up the largest share of those who go to the hospital with an injury, supporting previous research. But it also found black females were more likely than white males to go to the hospital with such a wound. The study, by the Urban Institute based on 2010 hospital data, showed uninsured victims were more likely to die than those with insurance. And up to 64 percent of the hospital costs were paid for with public money.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
Wow! Roye Templeton's letter, "Let's talk about white racism" (Aug. 24), nailed it. Without a doubt, the root cause of the race problem in America is racism and it's white racism, pure and simple, front and center. I just turned 82 this month and I still remember both of my parents being pulled off a sound truck and arrested in the early 1940's in Baltimore City for protesting police brutality. It's 2014 and nothing in that regard has really changed. A great many whites in this country have couched themselves in a comfort zone and not in reality, primarily because of the tremendous strides made during the civil rights era. Conservative TV pundits and print journalists routinely pooh-pooh the extent and depth of racism in America.
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