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By Dave Rosenthal | January 31, 2012
If you didn't get a chance to attend the recent Black and White Party, a fund-raiser for the Enoch Pratt Free Library, you can get a taste of the event at this Baltimore Sun photo gallery. The event, whose theme was "Evening in Paris," was organized by the Pratt Contemporaries, a group of young professional who support the library.  Here's another Pratt event worth attending: this Saturday's Booklovers' Breakfast with Michael Eric Dyson. It will be held at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, 700 Aliceanna St., from 8:30 a.m. to noon.
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By Cal Thomas | July 19, 2014
It may be too soon to label it a trend, and there is insufficient data to confirm it, but President Obama and his party may be losing their iron grip on their most loyal and enthusiastic voting bloc: African-Americans. Last Friday in Chicago, a group of black residents of the city's South Side, staged a protest against the violent shootings that are becoming as commonplace as White Sox games at Cellular Field. It wasn't just the protest that should concern the administration and Democrats; it was the language used by some of the protesters, many of whom at the time of the president's 2009 inauguration likely joined other African-Americans in worshipping at the Obama shrine.
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By Matt Vensel | April 13, 2011
Since Wiz Khalifa released his chart-topping Pittsburgh anthem "Black and Yellow," we have been treated to a bunch of remixes from rappers across the country who are repping their hometown teams, including Mullyman's Ravens-themed " Black and Purple . " Now Orioles fans have gotten their own anthem from Dboi Da Dome, E' From Da Wic and Jay Luv. We can all relate to "Orange and Black. " Well, except for the parts about drinking purple stuff and pulling out guns on non-Orioles fans.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
One day in 1870, 41 newly freed slaves got together in Jackson, Miss., to establish a new branch of mainstream Methodism called the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church. Hundreds of members of that denomination, now known as the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, gathered at the Baltimore Convention Center Friday to consecrate the 61st, 62nd and 63rd bishops in its history. A two-hour service marked the end of the historically black denomination's weeklong general conference, a convention members hold every four years to choose new leaders and weigh doctrinal changes.
NEWS
October 30, 2010
HAGERSTOWN — The state Department of Natural Resources says Maryland's bear hunt is closed. Sixty-seven bears were killed as of 9 p.m. on Friday and the hunt was closed. The season began on Monday. The hunt was limited to Allegany and Garrett counties.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | October 3, 1993
This fall, chic women will leave showy displays of color to nature. Instead, they'll be enveloping themselves in black to capture attention. Black defines the fashion season, as it has in the past, but this time it is expressed in the richness of velvets, silks and soft wools rather than harsh biker textures such as leather and denim. And the only accessory that head-to-toe black requires is a deftly painted face.
NEWS
By KEN HAMBLIN | March 15, 1991
Denver. Like most Americans, black and white, I overflowed with pride at the way our soldiers brought Desert Storm to a successful conclusion.But my moment of pride was spoiled when I remembered the self-indulgent and often hostile voice of ghetto dissent during the war. Today some of those Afro-American leaders would like us to forget how they argued that no black would benefit by serving America in this war. Contemptibly, they quarreled that because blacks...
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | December 1, 1993
Chicago.--Most of the public debate over whether the delicate question of race should matter in adoptions tends to miss the point. Maybe the real question is not whether whites should be allowed to adopt black babies, but rather, why are so few black parents allowed to adopt?Trans-racial adoptions, usually between white parents and black children, have won praise from some as a valuable, although still rare, way to find homes for adoptable black children.Unfortunately, since 1972 they also have been roundly condemned by the National Association of Black Social Workers as ''cultural genocide.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | January 6, 1991
Washington.THE CLOSER we get to war with Iraq, the louder black voices ask why any African-American should fight in a Persian Gulf war. In a very thoughtful column in the Washington Post Ron Walters, chairman of the political science department at historically black Howard University, said:''To put it bluntly, the Bush administration is playing race politics in a manner that would continue to deny national resources to blacks, while black lives are disproportionately...
NEWS
By Blaine Taylor | September 14, 1994
IT'S THE TIME of year for the Defenders' Day re-enactment at Fort McHenry, marking the anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore.But during such re-enactments little mention usually is made of the role African Americans played in the War of 1812. Black soldiers fought on both sides.What whites of that era feared most was a black slave uprising in the wake of the British assault.Some members of the British high command were planning just such a dreaded revolt.After taking command of the newly formed North American Station on Apr. 1, 1814, the next day Vice-Admiral Sir Alexander Forrester Inglis Cochrane, 55, issued this proclamation to black slaves in the United States that made white Americans' blood run cold:"This is therefore to give notice that all those who may be disposed to emigrate from the United States, will with their families be received on board His Majesty's ships or vessels of war . . . when they will have their choice of either entering into His Majesty's sea or land forces, or of being sent as FREE settlers to the British possessions in North America or the West Indies, where they will meet with all due encouragement."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 23, 2014
When historians get around to appraising the start of the new century, what will they say about it? If circumstances continue as they have been, the period may well be deemed a deep black hole in the political life of this country. From the disputatious presidential election of 2000, in which the supposedly nonpolitical Supreme Court stepped in to decide the winner; to the brutal terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon; to the unwarranted U.S. invasion of Iraq and its disastrous aftermath; to the Great Recession at home; and now the disintegration of the American-backed regime in Iraq, the last nearly 14 years have witnessed a woeful stall in the American dream.
NEWS
By David Wilson | June 23, 2014
A few years ago, the Maryland legislature appointed a panel to assess the way it was funding higher education. As part of its scope, the panel evaluated the funding needs of the state's historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), paying particular attention to the research infrastructure needs at Morgan State University, which in 2005 had received the coveted Carnegie designation of "Doctoral Research University" without any additional infusion of state resources. It achieved this designation because it annually awarded the requisite number of doctoral degrees and received sufficient external federal research funding to qualify.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
"To day has bin a memorable day," Emilie Frances Davis wrote in a miniature diary on Jan. 1, 1863, the date the Emancipation Proclamation became law. "I thank God I have bin here to see it. The day was religiously observed, all the churches were open. We had quite a Jubilee in the evening. I went to Joness to a party, had a very blessest time. " Davis, a 21-year-old seamstress and freeborn black woman living in Philadelphia, was jotting down her feelings about the event that came to be known as Jubilee Day in one of three pocket diaries she kept from 1863 to 1865 during the height of the Civil War. The diaries, which somehow avoided destruction, are being published now for the first time.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Robert L. Karwacki, a retired Maryland Court of Appeals judge who was president of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners during the troubled early 1970s, died of kidney failure Monday at his Chester home. The former Mount Vernon resident was 80. He was named head of the city's school board in 1970 and assisted in the appointment of Baltimore's first African-American schools superintendent. "Brown v. the Board was years earlier; Bob was a master in maintaining educational stability," said former Baltimore Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, who named him to the school post.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector | June 10, 2014
Larry Harris and Leonard Martin grew up around the block from each other but never knew it at the time, caught up as they were in regular childhood concerns and in keeping their heads down in the men-are-macho environment of West Baltimore. By the time they met as adults - Harris a few years out of the Army, Martin jumping through jobs and still looking for his spot in the world - they were surprised at how much they had in common. "It's kind of crazy we lived down the street …" Harris said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
A cadre of spiritual giants was inducted Saturday into the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum as the East Baltimore gallery looks to expand in its third decade. About 1,000 people gathered in Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center for a tribute ceremony honoring three pastors and a gospel singer for their roles inspiring the country through faith. "Thank God for blessing them so that they could bless others," Rep. Elijah Cummings told the audience. "I want to thank our honorees for changing the trajectory of so many people's destiny.
NEWS
By Ron Howell | April 24, 1998
PEOPLE don't often acknowledge it, but the Nation of Islam, headed now by mercurial Minister Louis Farrakhan, once published a newspaper -- Muhammad Speaks -- that ran some of the most incisive and timely reports to be found about black people.No less a figure than the brilliant historian C.L.R. James (a Marxist who could not tolerate the Nation's bizarre black supremacist ideas) said in the early 1970s: "I don't understand their ideology, but whoever edits their newspaper is a genius."For tens of thousands of blacks from sea to sea, Muhammad Speaks offered domestic and international news with a militant black perspective that was unique in the country.
FEATURES
By Karin D. Berry and Karin D. Berry,Staff Writer | March 22, 1993
It's black America's dirty little secret: Many African-Americans are prejudiced against each other on the basis of color.Filmmaker Spike Lee explored the problem in his movie "School Daze," and was castigated by many for doing so. Now Kathy Russell, Midge Wilson and Ronald Hall examine the history and implications of this deep-rooted prejudice in "The Color Complex."In the predominantly black neighborhood outside St. Louis where I grew up, we used to recite: "If you're white, you're all right; if you're brown, stick around; if you're black, jump back."
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