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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 8, 1999
NEW DELHI, India -- India's third election in as many years has returned the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party to power, this time at the head of a 24-party coalition government that must decide whether to continue with a costly nuclear arms program and whether to come to an arrangement with neighboring Pakistan over disputed Kashmir.The portents are not good. The same BJP officials will occupy key ministries -- External Affairs, Defense and the Home Ministry in charge of police and the judiciary -- leaving minor Cabinet posts to their coaltion partners.
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NEWS
May 14, 2004
THE LATEST version of the greatest show of electoral democracy on Earth - India's national parliamentary elections - led this week to a shocking upset for the Hindu nationalist party that has held sway in New Delhi for the last six years and that called the early vote in firm anticipation that it would win. Now expected are political deals that would return to power the Congress Party - with Italian-born Sonia Gandhi, somewhat incredibly, as the most...
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NEWS
By ROBERT BENJAMIN | June 9, 1991
New Delhi. -- About three dozen men and boys, all dressed in the same khaki shorts, stand in martial lines in a quiet compound. Their right forearms are held level across their chests with their outstretched palms facing downward in a stiff salute to the Indian flag. In unison, they recite a long prayer that begins:"Today we salute our motherland. You have given us everything and, for that purpose, my one desire is to be useful to you."Hundreds of such groups across India gather in much the same fashion early every morning for an hour's worth of martial arts, study and prayers -- an hour aimed at instilling a collective loyalty, a desire to serve India and a concept of nationalism based on India's main religion, Hinduism.
NEWS
April 22, 2002
WITH THE world riveted by the violence in the Middle East, the recent horrific flare-up in another long-running religious conflict - between Hindus and Muslims in India - has not gotten much notice. It's a dangerous turn, not only for India but also potentially for its tensions with Pakistan over Kashmir. And that could even spell trouble for Pakistan's attention to the U.S. war on terrorism. Since late February, about 1,000 Muslims have been killed in savage Hindu attacks that have been called a state-led pogrom and that have included lynchings, live burnings, torture and mass rape.
NEWS
June 2, 1996
THE CONFUSED MANDATE of the world's largest democratic election may bring the obscure H. D. Deve Gowda of the left-wing United Front to power in India. This group came in second in the April-May election to the Hindu extremist party, which was given first try but soon fell. The United Front can govern, but only with support of the Congress Party, which was thrown from office.So, although many members were running to roll back the free market reforms of the Congress Party government of P. V. Narasimha Rao, the new coalition will keep them.
NEWS
March 13, 1998
THOSE WHO hoped recent elections would usher India into a period of political calm and stability have been disappointed -- again. The new lower house of parliament will be even more splintered. No fewer than 39 parties will divide the 543 seats, making frequent quarrels and stalemates a foregone conclusion.The main Hindu nationalist movement, the Bharatiya Janata Party, is trying to form a government. Since its 179 seats fell short of a majority, it needs to form and maintain a coalition with willing minor parties.
NEWS
April 20, 1999
THIRTEEN months of government led by the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Jana Party (BJP) did not remake India. It did stir a nuclear arms race with Pakistan and religious-cultural bigotry directed mostly at Muslims. But the government of Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee also improved relations with Pakistan and the United States. And it initiated economic reforms that dismantled inefficient socialism, leading to hopes that India may help lead Asia back to economic health. Now that it has fallen for no good reason, the BJP government can be seen as the most productive of the five that India has had through two elections in three years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 1999
NEW DELHI, India -- Indian national elections begin today, and, as always, they are likely to be a great, if unwieldy, display of democracy, this time requiring a month of voting and 800,000 polling locations for the 605 million people eligible to cast a ballot.But as impressive as Indian elections may be, they are becoming too much of a good thing, with this being the third vote in 40 months, a result of fragmented and sometimes treacherous politics that produce easy-to-disassemble coalition governments.
NEWS
March 21, 1998
THE LAST TIME Atal Behari Vajpayee was sworn in as prime minister of India, his regime lasted 12 days. On the 13th, in 1996, he resigned rather than lose a confidence vote in parliament. Now he is in office again, with a better chance, though still heading a coalition commanding only a minority of votes, needing the silent acquiescence of more to stay in power.Mr. Vajpayee's Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) represents Hindu power and tradition of the vast majority of India's 952 million people, repudiating the secularism of the founding Congress Party.
NEWS
April 22, 2002
WITH THE world riveted by the violence in the Middle East, the recent horrific flare-up in another long-running religious conflict - between Hindus and Muslims in India - has not gotten much notice. It's a dangerous turn, not only for India but also potentially for its tensions with Pakistan over Kashmir. And that could even spell trouble for Pakistan's attention to the U.S. war on terrorism. Since late February, about 1,000 Muslims have been killed in savage Hindu attacks that have been called a state-led pogrom and that have included lynchings, live burnings, torture and mass rape.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 8, 1999
NEW DELHI, India -- India's third election in as many years has returned the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party to power, this time at the head of a 24-party coalition government that must decide whether to continue with a costly nuclear arms program and whether to come to an arrangement with neighboring Pakistan over disputed Kashmir.The portents are not good. The same BJP officials will occupy key ministries -- External Affairs, Defense and the Home Ministry in charge of police and the judiciary -- leaving minor Cabinet posts to their coaltion partners.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 1999
NEW DELHI, India -- Indian national elections begin today, and, as always, they are likely to be a great, if unwieldy, display of democracy, this time requiring a month of voting and 800,000 polling locations for the 605 million people eligible to cast a ballot.But as impressive as Indian elections may be, they are becoming too much of a good thing, with this being the third vote in 40 months, a result of fragmented and sometimes treacherous politics that produce easy-to-disassemble coalition governments.
NEWS
April 20, 1999
THIRTEEN months of government led by the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Jana Party (BJP) did not remake India. It did stir a nuclear arms race with Pakistan and religious-cultural bigotry directed mostly at Muslims. But the government of Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee also improved relations with Pakistan and the United States. And it initiated economic reforms that dismantled inefficient socialism, leading to hopes that India may help lead Asia back to economic health. Now that it has fallen for no good reason, the BJP government can be seen as the most productive of the five that India has had through two elections in three years.
NEWS
March 21, 1998
THE LAST TIME Atal Behari Vajpayee was sworn in as prime minister of India, his regime lasted 12 days. On the 13th, in 1996, he resigned rather than lose a confidence vote in parliament. Now he is in office again, with a better chance, though still heading a coalition commanding only a minority of votes, needing the silent acquiescence of more to stay in power.Mr. Vajpayee's Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) represents Hindu power and tradition of the vast majority of India's 952 million people, repudiating the secularism of the founding Congress Party.
NEWS
March 13, 1998
THOSE WHO hoped recent elections would usher India into a period of political calm and stability have been disappointed -- again. The new lower house of parliament will be even more splintered. No fewer than 39 parties will divide the 543 seats, making frequent quarrels and stalemates a foregone conclusion.The main Hindu nationalist movement, the Bharatiya Janata Party, is trying to form a government. Since its 179 seats fell short of a majority, it needs to form and maintain a coalition with willing minor parties.
NEWS
June 2, 1996
THE CONFUSED MANDATE of the world's largest democratic election may bring the obscure H. D. Deve Gowda of the left-wing United Front to power in India. This group came in second in the April-May election to the Hindu extremist party, which was given first try but soon fell. The United Front can govern, but only with support of the Congress Party, which was thrown from office.So, although many members were running to roll back the free market reforms of the Congress Party government of P. V. Narasimha Rao, the new coalition will keep them.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
THE LATEST version of the greatest show of electoral democracy on Earth - India's national parliamentary elections - led this week to a shocking upset for the Hindu nationalist party that has held sway in New Delhi for the last six years and that called the early vote in firm anticipation that it would win. Now expected are political deals that would return to power the Congress Party - with Italian-born Sonia Gandhi, somewhat incredibly, as the most...
NEWS
May 4, 1996
THE LOGISTICS of India's election defy the imagination. The electorate is some 590-million strong, nearly half illiterate. People vote on ballots with varied languages and picture symbols. Their voting is usually as informed and intelligent as anywhere. The turnout will exceed 60 percent and results are not due till May 10.Yes, there are arrests and sporadic violence. But by comparison with most countries, the election is remarkably fair and free. Voters are disillusioned with the Congress Party that always said it was for the poor and disgusted with its corruption.
NEWS
May 4, 1996
THE LOGISTICS of India's election defy the imagination. The electorate is some 590-million strong, nearly half illiterate. People vote on ballots with varied languages and picture symbols. Their voting is usually as informed and intelligent as anywhere. The turnout will exceed 60 percent and results are not due till May 10.Yes, there are arrests and sporadic violence. But by comparison with most countries, the election is remarkably fair and free. Voters are disillusioned with the Congress Party that always said it was for the poor and disgusted with its corruption.
NEWS
By ROBERT BENJAMIN | June 9, 1991
New Delhi. -- About three dozen men and boys, all dressed in the same khaki shorts, stand in martial lines in a quiet compound. Their right forearms are held level across their chests with their outstretched palms facing downward in a stiff salute to the Indian flag. In unison, they recite a long prayer that begins:"Today we salute our motherland. You have given us everything and, for that purpose, my one desire is to be useful to you."Hundreds of such groups across India gather in much the same fashion early every morning for an hour's worth of martial arts, study and prayers -- an hour aimed at instilling a collective loyalty, a desire to serve India and a concept of nationalism based on India's main religion, Hinduism.
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