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By Joe Forsthoffer and Joe Forsthoffer,Contributing Writer | February 15, 1993
BIVALVE -- "More rat!" comes the request."More rat coming up!" answers a voice from the kitchen, and a moment later a steaming bowl of muskrat joins the turkey and stuffing, sweet potatoes, greens, corn bread and steamed tomatoes making their way through the community hall of the Westside Volunteer Fire Department here.By 11:30 yesterday morning, a half-hour before the dinner was to start, folks were lined up and waiting for muskrat. By 5 p.m., an estimated crowd of 800 people had consumed 550 muskrats, 35 turkeys and vegetables by the bushel.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
- With oysters showing signs of revival in the Chesapeake Bay, some are trying to bring the bivalves back in the bay's second largest tributary, the Potomac River. Just two years into their fledgling effort to restore the river's once-bountiful oyster population, however, organizers are raising alarms about a large marina proposed in Charles County near the Potomac's largest and formerly most productive oyster bar. The 143-slip marina would provide berths for residents and guests of a 900-acre resort community planned on the waterfront here.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1998
I BELIEVE it was Homer who wrote that wars are fought so that poets may have tales to spin.What a delicious notion, deflating to generals and heads of state. It means that art is what endures, after time's passage erodes to footnotes the human dramas that inspired it.So it is I have always found inspiration in some lines of verse from the late Chesapeake poet, Gilbert Byron:Hip-booted men with long tongs,come to the cove again;Rake the bar of oysters bareyet seldom the surface mar.Men who never wrote a lineare the greatest poets ever,verses of love inscribed uponthe bottom of the cove.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 3, 2013
Now for a bit of good news - and from an environmental group at that. Drew Koslow, the Choptank Riverkeeper, reports that while walking the shore of Harris Creek in Talbot County, he saw an "amazing" abundance of oysters growing in the intertidal zone, inundated by water at high tide but exposed to the air at ebb. "You literally couldn't take a step without walking on oysters," Koslow said in a recent release by the Mid-Shore Riverkeeper Conservancy....
NEWS
August 30, 2003
William H. Pindell Sr., a retired electrician and former Baltimore resident, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Aug. 23 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. He was 74. Mr. Pindell, who was born and raised in Baltimore, served with the Maryland State Guard, now the Maryland Defense Force, during World War II. After his discharge in 1946, Mr. Pindell studied printing at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, graduating in 1948. He enlisted in the Navy that year and served aboard submarines until being discharged in 1950.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1996
BIVALVE -- The 18th annual Great North American Turtle Race drew a turtle from Florida and a 12-year-old contestant from Wyoming to this Wicomico hamlet yesterday. But the sweltering day -- and the biggest trophy -- belonged to the natives.Twelve-year-old Artie Abbott of Delmar and turtle No. 213 -- a Nanticoke River resident -- outpaced 464 other turtles to take top honors."I'm smaller than the trophy!" said a beaming Artie after the race. A quick comparison showed he was taller, but just barely.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | May 27, 1995
BIVALVE, N.J. -- On a late-August morning in 1956, Clyde A. Phillips had perhaps history's first encounter with the tinymonster that would change a way of life on both Delaware and Chesapeake bays.Phillips, a prosperous oyster planter, had gone that fateful morning for a routine, pre-season inspection of his shellfish beds that lay off what might be called the "other" Jersey Shore.These vast marshes, brackish tidal rivers and isolated necks bordering Delaware Bay today seem like the dark side of the moon compared with the bustle and throng of Cape May, Wildwood, Atlantic City and the state's other Atlantic beaches.
FEATURES
September 16, 2006
9 a.m. HISTORIC SHARPSBURG -- Remember the Battle of Antietam with period music, lectures, children's activities and crafts during Sharpsburg Heritage Day, which runs until 5 p.m., in downtown Sharpsburg. For information, visit sharpsburghistoricalsociety.org or call 301-432-6856. 10 a.m. REPTILE RENDEZVOUS -- If you love snakes, lizards, frogs and other cold-blooded creatures check out the Mid-Atlantic Reptile Show that runs until 4:30 p.m. today and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow at the 4-H Hall at the Maryland State Fairgrounds, 2200 York Road, Timonium.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | November 26, 2000
WHEN THE temperature drops and the oysters fatten, I get a hankering for my favorite mollusk. I can't say I have never met a Maryland oyster I didn't like. Once I ate oysters and spaghetti that had been baked for two hours. Everything resembled rubber. But outside of that sad situation, almost every other encounter I have had with oysters has been time deliciously spent. Maryland has many celebrations paying homage to its local shellfish, including the National Oyster Cook-off and accompanying oyster festival held near the end of October in Leonardtown.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 7, 2012
Spring's time for planting more than flower and vegetable gardens.  it's oyster planting time, too. Last week, the Oyster Recovery Partnership put 31 million baby oysters in Harris Creek, near the mouth of the Choptank River. The oysters were bred at the University of Maryland's Horn Point hatchery , and primed for planting once they had settled as "spat" on old oyster shells. It was the first of a series of plantings the Annapolis-based nonprofit hopes to make this year, seeding Harris Creek, the Severn River and possibly a couple other spots in the Chesapeake Bay with a projected 300-500 million bivalves.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 7, 2012
Spring's time for planting more than flower and vegetable gardens.  it's oyster planting time, too. Last week, the Oyster Recovery Partnership put 31 million baby oysters in Harris Creek, near the mouth of the Choptank River. The oysters were bred at the University of Maryland's Horn Point hatchery , and primed for planting once they had settled as "spat" on old oyster shells. It was the first of a series of plantings the Annapolis-based nonprofit hopes to make this year, seeding Harris Creek, the Severn River and possibly a couple other spots in the Chesapeake Bay with a projected 300-500 million bivalves.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler | December 5, 2011
Maryland's fledgling oyster aquaculture industry gets a little national exposure this week, as the Cooking Channel pays a call on the Choptank Oyster Co. near Cambridge. In this week's episode of " Pitchin' In " a new series that appears to be the Cooking Channel's version of "Dirty Jobs ," Chef Lynn Crawford learns the hard way that "farming oysters is a filthy, dirty job," according to the online show blurb . The Choptank Oyster Co ., also known as Marinetics Inc., is arguably one of the most established of the state's oyster farms.  It's been raising millions of oysters in floats since 1996.  Its "Choptank Sweets" and "Choptank Salts" are sold and served on both sides of the Chesapeake Bay. The episode airs at 2:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m. EST Thursday, Dec. 8, then again at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 10.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
The tropical storm that deluged Maryland in early September may have killed off many of the oysters in the upper Chesapeake Bay, a Department of Natural Resources spokesman said Monday. DNR spokesman Josh Davidsburg wouldn't say how extensive or severe the die-off was, saying state biologists are still checking. But he did say preliminary reports indicate the bivalves died from an overwhelming influx of fresh water into the upper bay after Tropical Storm Lee, which rained 12 inches or more over much of the region.
NEWS
May 10, 2011
Maryland is heavily invested in restoring the Chesapeake Bay's oyster population, as well it should be. The tasty bivalves are not only prized by epicures and the watermen who harvest them but also by all those who care about the bay's health because, as filter feeders, oysters remove excess nutrients from the water. So recent estimates by state officials — as reported this week by the University of Maryland's student-staffed Capital News Service — that perhaps one-third (and possibly as much as 80 percent)
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Greg Garland and Rona Kobell and Greg Garland,Sun reporters | April 1, 2007
At the Hyatt Regency resort in Cambridge, several dozen scientists, watermen and government regulators gathered to sip martinis and mingle over hors d'oeuvres. Later, there were cheers and tributes as they dined on crab and filet mignon. The mood was celebratory at January's annual meeting of the Oyster Recovery Partnership. Yet the government-financed nonprofit has made little progress toward its stated mission of restoring oysters to the Chesapeake Bay.
FEATURES
September 16, 2006
9 a.m. HISTORIC SHARPSBURG -- Remember the Battle of Antietam with period music, lectures, children's activities and crafts during Sharpsburg Heritage Day, which runs until 5 p.m., in downtown Sharpsburg. For information, visit sharpsburghistoricalsociety.org or call 301-432-6856. 10 a.m. REPTILE RENDEZVOUS -- If you love snakes, lizards, frogs and other cold-blooded creatures check out the Mid-Atlantic Reptile Show that runs until 4:30 p.m. today and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow at the 4-H Hall at the Maryland State Fairgrounds, 2200 York Road, Timonium.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Greg Garland and Rona Kobell and Greg Garland,Sun reporters | April 1, 2007
At the Hyatt Regency resort in Cambridge, several dozen scientists, watermen and government regulators gathered to sip martinis and mingle over hors d'oeuvres. Later, there were cheers and tributes as they dined on crab and filet mignon. The mood was celebratory at January's annual meeting of the Oyster Recovery Partnership. Yet the government-financed nonprofit has made little progress toward its stated mission of restoring oysters to the Chesapeake Bay.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 11, 2006
I don't like oysters, but I'm drawn to Baltimore's oyster roasts. Throughout the winter, I'll spot an inelegant fraternal hall on the east or west side of town with a full parking lot on a Sunday afternoon. It's a good bet that the shuckers' hands are moving quickly and the tip bowl is full of singles, maybe a five. A bad band is playing background music. Church halls are also classic venues. And any politician seeking office had better be there. I pity the poor candidate who can't slurp down a paper platter of raw oysters.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 11, 2006
I don't like oysters, but I'm drawn to Baltimore's oyster roasts. Throughout the winter, I'll spot an inelegant fraternal hall on the east or west side of town with a full parking lot on a Sunday afternoon. It's a good bet that the shuckers' hands are moving quickly and the tip bowl is full of singles, maybe a five. A bad band is playing background music. Church halls are also classic venues. And any politician seeking office had better be there. I pity the poor candidate who can't slurp down a paper platter of raw oysters.
NEWS
By RONA KOBELL and RONA KOBELL,SUN REPORTER | February 18, 2006
SOLOMONS -- As the wind whips at his back, Capt. Harry Huseman steers the Karen Bee to a spot in the Patuxent River just beyond the highway bridge connecting this Southern Maryland island to St. Mary's County. He uses a machine to lower rusty tongs into the murky water below. Within seconds, a pulley hoists up a whole lot of shells and muck - and within it, a batch of market-sized oysters. The 81-year-old oysterman says he's having a good year, and he's not the only one. So far, Maryland's oyster harvest is at 100,000 bushels - already the best season in the past five years, and it's not over until March 31. Those numbers are nowhere near historic levels, which were measured in millions.
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