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Bite The Bullet

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NEWS
December 7, 1995
DONALD I. DELL believes that he and his fellow Carroll commissioners should "bite the bullet and do what's right" regarding the proposed purchase of the former Telemecanique plant for use as county school board headquarters.Mr. Dell frames the issue perfectly -- even though he's on the wrong side of it. Indeed, the commissioners should "bite the bullet and do what's right" by not closing this deal until there is a thorough public discussion of the pollution problems at the former industrial site.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 8, 2007
Yesterday, while Russell Crowe was winning his best set of reviews in years for his tour-de-force villainy in 3:10 to Yuma, he was also playing a soccer dad in Annapolis. It was his first day of shooting on the international espionage thriller Body of Lies, and Crowe was doing two scenes at St. Andrew's United Methodist Day School: easing into the carpool area and watching one of his two fictional kids play soccer. Costarring Leonardo DiCaprio as a CIA agent determined to disrupt a terrorist network and Crowe as his boss, Body of Lies, adapted by William Monahan (The Departed)
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BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it is embarking on an aggressive round of investments in its television stations nationwide, and warned Wall Street analysts that this spending will temporarily drag down the Cockeysville company's financial numbers.Sinclair cast its announcement as a reaction to changes in the television industry. Independent television station owners like Sinclair face ever-increasing competition from cable and satellite television, movies and the Internet.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | March 4, 2007
On the back wall of his new office, painted a deep Democratic blue by his Republican predecessor, Gov. Martin O'Malley has hung photographs of his family: his four children, his wife and his father, Tom, who died before Mr. O'Malley was elected last November. A World War II pilot and U.S. Department of Justice lawyer, the elder O'Malley worked in his son's campaigns - and was never reluctant to express his views. "I feel like he's talking to me more in the last year than he did in the last year of his life.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2000
Joe Louis Gladney feels trapped in a losing proposition. Last year, when diesel was running about a dollar a gallon, he extended his bus company's contract to provide transportation for Baltimore City public schools. Since then diesel prices have nearly doubled. "We have to absorb the increase with no restitution from Baltimore City," said Gladney, who opened Gladney Transportation Inc. 30 years ago. "If profits are constantly being eaten up by expenses and you're not being reimbursed, how does that leave you?
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2002
My computer is about 2 years old. And, though I would like to upgrade to a newer one, I don't have the funds to purchase what I want at this time. My system is a 166 MHz Pentium w/MMX running Windows 95. Should I upgrade the operating system, and, if so, to what - Windows 98? I'm finding less and less support for Windows 95 out there, including from Microsoft, and I am not a techie who can keep 95 running forever. Any help you can provide will be appreciated. It's relatively easy to get one's hands on older operating systems such as Windows 98 or even Windows 95 at discount stores or using auction Web sites such as www. ebay.
NEWS
July 9, 1991
There's one consolation for the nation's governors and state legislators. They all have the same problems that won't go away: Enormous mountains of debt, state constitutions that require balanced budgets and an unwillingness either to raise taxes or cut spending to achieve this goal on time.The impact of the recession, after a decade of prosperity, has staggered state governments. Plunging revenues make it impossible to finance expanded social problems and maintain enlarged bureaucracies.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 8, 2007
Yesterday, while Russell Crowe was winning his best set of reviews in years for his tour-de-force villainy in 3:10 to Yuma, he was also playing a soccer dad in Annapolis. It was his first day of shooting on the international espionage thriller Body of Lies, and Crowe was doing two scenes at St. Andrew's United Methodist Day School: easing into the carpool area and watching one of his two fictional kids play soccer. Costarring Leonardo DiCaprio as a CIA agent determined to disrupt a terrorist network and Crowe as his boss, Body of Lies, adapted by William Monahan (The Departed)
BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy and Joyce Lain Kennedy,Sun Features Inc | November 11, 1991
Dear Joyce: I have learned a great deal from your columns but I haven't seen my question addressed. Three months ago I took a job against my better judgment because the pay is high, the benefits are good and the market is soft. I now realize I made a mistake and find myself hating to go to work in the morning, moving through the day on automatic pilot and counting the minutes until the clock strikes 5:30.My wife, who is employed, wants me to wait until the recession is really over, at least until election time next year when the market may improve.
NEWS
September 23, 1992
Tax sheltersIn 1989 and 1990, RJR Nabisco wrote off over $3 billion in interest payments. Time Warner deducted $2.1 billion in interest payments. (1989 and 1990). The net operating loss write-offs are costing the U.S. Treasury billions of dollars.Carnival Cruises has earned a fortune in our nation. They pay little or no income tax because their company was incorporated in Panama.The tax rules and regulations won't be corrected just so long as the deal makers on Wall Street control the lawmakers in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2002
My computer is about 2 years old. And, though I would like to upgrade to a newer one, I don't have the funds to purchase what I want at this time. My system is a 166 MHz Pentium w/MMX running Windows 95. Should I upgrade the operating system, and, if so, to what - Windows 98? I'm finding less and less support for Windows 95 out there, including from Microsoft, and I am not a techie who can keep 95 running forever. Any help you can provide will be appreciated. It's relatively easy to get one's hands on older operating systems such as Windows 98 or even Windows 95 at discount stores or using auction Web sites such as www. ebay.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2000
Joe Louis Gladney feels trapped in a losing proposition. Last year, when diesel was running about a dollar a gallon, he extended his bus company's contract to provide transportation for Baltimore City public schools. Since then diesel prices have nearly doubled. "We have to absorb the increase with no restitution from Baltimore City," said Gladney, who opened Gladney Transportation Inc. 30 years ago. "If profits are constantly being eaten up by expenses and you're not being reimbursed, how does that leave you?
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it is embarking on an aggressive round of investments in its television stations nationwide, and warned Wall Street analysts that this spending will temporarily drag down the Cockeysville company's financial numbers.Sinclair cast its announcement as a reaction to changes in the television industry. Independent television station owners like Sinclair face ever-increasing competition from cable and satellite television, movies and the Internet.
NEWS
May 3, 1996
PROTESTS by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke that city government has nothing left to cut save bone and marrow are beginning to ring hollow. Each day it becomes clearer that his budget still has fat that can be trimmed. A mayor in his third term should feel more comfortable than most letting specific constituencies know their pet programs must go. But if Mr. Schmoke isn't going to do it, then the City Council must take charge and reduce government to an appropriate size that will not only solve current budget problems but avert future crises that will occur if the status quo is allowed to prevail.
NEWS
February 22, 1996
"IT WAS THE BEST of times, it was the worst of times." That often quoted line from Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities" seems to portray the different impressions one gets when comparing cuts in the proposed Howard County budget to increases in the Columbia Association spending plan. But some things aren't what they appear to be.County Executive Charles I. Ecker is proposing a 4.5 percent cut in the general fund next year and a 12 percent cut over the next 2 1/2 years. In contrast, the 28-year-old planned community is considering a 5.25 percent budget increase.
NEWS
December 7, 1995
DONALD I. DELL believes that he and his fellow Carroll commissioners should "bite the bullet and do what's right" regarding the proposed purchase of the former Telemecanique plant for use as county school board headquarters.Mr. Dell frames the issue perfectly -- even though he's on the wrong side of it. Indeed, the commissioners should "bite the bullet and do what's right" by not closing this deal until there is a thorough public discussion of the pollution problems at the former industrial site.
NEWS
June 17, 1993
Bite the BulletElizabeth M. Philip seems to think that a voucher plan would be a magic bullet to "fix" education in Baltimore (letter, May 22). Not so.Nonpublic schools seem desirable to some parents, but that is because they can select the students they serve, can get rid of those who do not fit their program and rarely enroll expensive-to-educate kids with severe physical or mental handicaps.A voucher plan in Baltimore might benefit a few students, but at the cost of hurting all the rest.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | March 4, 2007
On the back wall of his new office, painted a deep Democratic blue by his Republican predecessor, Gov. Martin O'Malley has hung photographs of his family: his four children, his wife and his father, Tom, who died before Mr. O'Malley was elected last November. A World War II pilot and U.S. Department of Justice lawyer, the elder O'Malley worked in his son's campaigns - and was never reluctant to express his views. "I feel like he's talking to me more in the last year than he did in the last year of his life.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN STAFF Sun reporter Sandy Banisky contributed to this article | October 3, 1995
The pope is an expensive guest. The Baltimore Archdiocese is trying to make sure he is an affordable one.Toward that end, church officials have made a determined effort to solicit donations of goods and services to keep the archdiocese's cash outlay to a minimum. Dozens of businesses and institutions have answered Cardinal William H. Keeler's call, making contributions of everything from funeral home limousines to the altar at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, from Babe Ruth commemorative coins to a performance by Boyz II Men.The donations are intended to help the archdiocese keep its cash expenses under $250,000, the amount raised from parishes in a special collection last year.
NEWS
February 24, 1995
A plan to double Carroll County's impact fee on new home construction is quickly losing its allure as a budget cure-all. While the county commissioners apparently realize that levying a $4,755 fee on each new house won't accomplish as much as they hoped, they are now left with the reality that some type of tax increase will be needed to pay for the public schools, roads and other infrastructure that were neglected during the past few years.During last year's election, a substantially larger impact fee was sold as the remedy for the county's fiscal problems, as well as a means to control growth.
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