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By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Republican gubernatorial hopeful Ron George usually keeps quiet about the flashiest part of his biography. But as he fielded a question about film tax credits at a candidates forum last week, George let slip that he had a brief and unglamorous career as a daytime soap opera actor. "I got to die once and come back a couple months later," George told a crowd at the University of Maryland law school. That's not all. The Republican delegate from Anne Arundel County is still a card-carrying member of the Screen Actors Guild, he said, a distinction that over the decades has earned him bit parts in various productions.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Republican gubernatorial hopeful Ron George usually keeps quiet about the flashiest part of his biography. But as he fielded a question about film tax credits at a candidates forum last week, George let slip that he had a brief and unglamorous career as a daytime soap opera actor. "I got to die once and come back a couple months later," George told a crowd at the University of Maryland law school. That's not all. The Republican delegate from Anne Arundel County is still a card-carrying member of the Screen Actors Guild, he said, a distinction that over the decades has earned him bit parts in various productions.
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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
They came in evening gowns, gym gear, shorts, midriff tops and business suits -- all coiffed, spritzed, tattooed and ponytailed. Large as Mr. T, small as a minute.Nearly everyone fit the bill.But all you needed was ambition.Hundreds smiled through a fast-paced cattle call yesterday at Gate A of PSINet Stadium seeking a bit part in "The Replacements," a movie based on the 1987 National Football League players' strike that will star Gene Hackman and Keanu Reeves and be shot in Charm City beginning next month.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
We've arrived, I think. The Baltimore area has long been used by Washington politicians seeking outside-the-Beltway backdrops and beating well-worn paths to the GM plant in White Marsh or Jimmy's in Fells Point. But now, Baltimore itself has been cast in something of a role reversal — playing Washington. That's right: Baltimore has become Washington's body double. Just as Julia Louis-Dreyfus wrapped up filming the HBO pilot and political satire "Veep" in these parts, another HBO crew is headed here to film "Game Change," based on the wonderfully dishy book of the same name about the 2008 presidential campaign.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
We've arrived, I think. The Baltimore area has long been used by Washington politicians seeking outside-the-Beltway backdrops and beating well-worn paths to the GM plant in White Marsh or Jimmy's in Fells Point. But now, Baltimore itself has been cast in something of a role reversal — playing Washington. That's right: Baltimore has become Washington's body double. Just as Julia Louis-Dreyfus wrapped up filming the HBO pilot and political satire "Veep" in these parts, another HBO crew is headed here to film "Game Change," based on the wonderfully dishy book of the same name about the 2008 presidential campaign.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg | November 15, 1998
Along with the tabloid coverage and lawsuits, the best thing about being notorious has got to be doing movie cameos. It's easy work, and besides, when someone's tainted reputation precedes him or her, it's hard to be accepted as another character anyway.There are exceptions, of course. Take debutante turned revolutionary turned socialite Patty Hearst, currently in John Waters' "Pecker." She started out as a novelty cameo diva for Waters, but has managed to parlay it into an actual career.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 29, 1990
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- There's no doubt that shortly before midnight on May 10, 1988, someone bit off half of Officer David J. Storton's ear.But the debate over which defendant may be to blame -- Shawn or Jonathan Blick -- has created double trouble for Santa Clara County's courts.The problem: The brothers Blick, 21, of Palo Alto, are identical twins.Both are charged with mayhem, attempted burglary, assaulting a police officer and aggravated mayhem. The latter charge carries a possible life sentence.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
The hours can be kind of crazy on this job. No, the hours can be very crazy. What else can you say about a workday that can start at 7 p.m. -- a time when most folks are sitting down for dinner -- and continue until 7 the following morning?The hours seesaw between days and nights. The job can be right here in Baltimore, or in Boston or over on the left coast. "I don't think I will ever get used to the schedule," says Brook Yeaton. "But it's worth it. I can sleep when I'm 40."When you're "The Prop Man of Maryland," you go along with the flow.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1996
Ravens wide receiver Ray Ethridge was the San Diego Chargers' third-round draft pick in 1992. Since then, he has been in and out of NFL training camps, but has yet to play a down in a regular-season game.And he may never get the opportunity.Ethridge, 27, is one of many players the Ravens have to make serious judgment on in the next couple of days, beginning with tonight's preseason game against the Green Bay Packers at Memorial Stadium.Ravens vice president of personnel Ozzie Newsome and coach Ted Marchibroda will huddle this weekend as the team prepares for its first cut of 20 players by Tuesday's deadline, which requires teams to reduce their rosters to 60 players.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | October 4, 2006
The cameras will roll again in Baltimore, and this time the local connection isn't restricted to the set's location. Movie crews are scheduled to be in Federal Hill filming scenes Friday for Shooter, a thriller starring Mark Wahlberg and slated for a March release. Based on the novel Point of Impact, by former Sun movie critic Stephen Hunter, now a Pulitzer Prize-winning critic for The Washington Post, the film centers on an Army sniper who finds himself framed for a political assassination.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | October 4, 2006
The cameras will roll again in Baltimore, and this time the local connection isn't restricted to the set's location. Movie crews are scheduled to be in Federal Hill filming scenes Friday for Shooter, a thriller starring Mark Wahlberg and slated for a March release. Based on the novel Point of Impact, by former Sun movie critic Stephen Hunter, now a Pulitzer Prize-winning critic for The Washington Post, the film centers on an Army sniper who finds himself framed for a political assassination.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
They came in evening gowns, gym gear, shorts, midriff tops and business suits -- all coiffed, spritzed, tattooed and ponytailed. Large as Mr. T, small as a minute.Nearly everyone fit the bill.But all you needed was ambition.Hundreds smiled through a fast-paced cattle call yesterday at Gate A of PSINet Stadium seeking a bit part in "The Replacements," a movie based on the 1987 National Football League players' strike that will star Gene Hackman and Keanu Reeves and be shot in Charm City beginning next month.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg | November 15, 1998
Along with the tabloid coverage and lawsuits, the best thing about being notorious has got to be doing movie cameos. It's easy work, and besides, when someone's tainted reputation precedes him or her, it's hard to be accepted as another character anyway.There are exceptions, of course. Take debutante turned revolutionary turned socialite Patty Hearst, currently in John Waters' "Pecker." She started out as a novelty cameo diva for Waters, but has managed to parlay it into an actual career.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
In 1951, a furious political circus surrounded Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, convicted for leaking information about the atomic bomb to the Soviet Union.But there was more at play in the case than communism and conspiracy. Like Jell-O, for instance.Such historical facts, both obscure and well-known, make up the third annual installment of "American Originals," an exhibit at the National Archives Building in Washington."American Originals," which opened in December and will run for a year, features sometimes quirky, frequently compelling documents, images and paraphernalia that show aspects of American history from 1704 to 1991.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
The hours can be kind of crazy on this job. No, the hours can be very crazy. What else can you say about a workday that can start at 7 p.m. -- a time when most folks are sitting down for dinner -- and continue until 7 the following morning?The hours seesaw between days and nights. The job can be right here in Baltimore, or in Boston or over on the left coast. "I don't think I will ever get used to the schedule," says Brook Yeaton. "But it's worth it. I can sleep when I'm 40."When you're "The Prop Man of Maryland," you go along with the flow.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1996
Ravens wide receiver Ray Ethridge was the San Diego Chargers' third-round draft pick in 1992. Since then, he has been in and out of NFL training camps, but has yet to play a down in a regular-season game.And he may never get the opportunity.Ethridge, 27, is one of many players the Ravens have to make serious judgment on in the next couple of days, beginning with tonight's preseason game against the Green Bay Packers at Memorial Stadium.Ravens vice president of personnel Ozzie Newsome and coach Ted Marchibroda will huddle this weekend as the team prepares for its first cut of 20 players by Tuesday's deadline, which requires teams to reduce their rosters to 60 players.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
In 1951, a furious political circus surrounded Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, convicted for leaking information about the atomic bomb to the Soviet Union.But there was more at play in the case than communism and conspiracy. Like Jell-O, for instance.Such historical facts, both obscure and well-known, make up the third annual installment of "American Originals," an exhibit at the National Archives Building in Washington."American Originals," which opened in December and will run for a year, features sometimes quirky, frequently compelling documents, images and paraphernalia that show aspects of American history from 1704 to 1991.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 12, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has a bit part as a security guard at the State House in Annapolis. The Rev. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor of Bethel AME Church, has a bigger part as an influential minister delivering a powerful sermon on the eve of a hotly contested Baltimore mayoral primary. And Edward T. Norris, the former police commissioner and convicted felon, is back in his recurring role as a hard-working homicide detective named Ed Norris who is just trying to do good ole police work.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 29, 1990
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- There's no doubt that shortly before midnight on May 10, 1988, someone bit off half of Officer David J. Storton's ear.But the debate over which defendant may be to blame -- Shawn or Jonathan Blick -- has created double trouble for Santa Clara County's courts.The problem: The brothers Blick, 21, of Palo Alto, are identical twins.Both are charged with mayhem, attempted burglary, assaulting a police officer and aggravated mayhem. The latter charge carries a possible life sentence.
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