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NEWS
September 8, 1992
Raymond A. Bissell, founder of Baltimore Heating & Air Conditioning, died Thursday of heart failure at the Roland Park Retirement Community. He was 83.A private memorial service is to be held at Grace United Methodist Church in North Baltimore, where he had been a member and an usher.Born in East Orange, N.J., Mr. Bissell was a 1930 graduate of Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., where he received his undergraduate degree in economics and was a member of Theta Chi fraternity.He spent most of his career in heating and air conditioning and was national sales promotion manager for Bryant Heating and Air Conditioning in Cleveland before moving to Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 10, 2010
Braden Brook Altemus, a manufacturer's representative of household products and a high school sports enthusiast, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease April 3 at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland. The Towson resident was 83. Born in Johnstown, Pa., he enlisted in the Navy during World War II and was assigned to the University of Virginia, where he earned a naval science degree and played baseball and basketball. He received a degree in 1946 and served aboard a destroyer, the USS Blue with the 19th Fleet Pacific Reserve.
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NEWS
February 10, 2003
Jane E. Torr, a retired city social worker and community volunteer, died Thursday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. She was 71 and lived in Parkville, where she was struck by a car Wednesday while crossing Harford Road. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., she graduated from Reading High School in Pennsylvania in 1949, studied science for a year at the University of Rochester, and later earned a bachelor's degree in art and education at the State University of New York - Potsdam. Ms. Torr had planned to be an art teacher, but found social work more gratifying, said her daughter, Dr. Patricia Bissell Zeffert of Pikesville.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
Charles Bissell does not look like a man who has made it. He is 40, graying, balding and recently laid off from his job at a Manhattan ad agency. He rents a room in a friend's house in northern Jersey and, on this night, he is wearing an orange pocket T-shirt and green shorts showing off pasty white calves. His story could be a cautionary tale to any band that harbors illusions of making it big one day. Bissell has been there - the million-dollar contract offer, the swooning music industry executives - and he knows it is fleeting, and often not the path to good music anyway.
NEWS
June 18, 2002
Silas Trim Bissell, 60, a member of the militant 1960s anti-war group the Weathermen who was convicted of trying to bomb a University of Washington ROTC building, died Saturday in Eugene, Ore., of brain cancer. Mr. Bissell was arrested in Eugene in January 1987, nearly 17 years after the failed 1970 bombing attempt in Seattle. He received a two-year sentence on charges of conspiracy to damage federal property and possession of a destructive device, and was released after 18 months. Mr. Bissell was working as a physical therapist and artist under the name Terrence Peter Jackson when an acquaintance informed police of his real identity.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
City and state officials gave Esskay Inc. a plan yesterday intended to keep the meat packing operation in Baltimore, and officials said a decision on the operation's fate could be made in three to four weeks."
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
Charles Bissell does not look like a man who has made it. He is 40, graying, balding and recently laid off from his job at a Manhattan ad agency. He rents a room in a friend's house in northern Jersey and, on this night, he is wearing an orange pocket T-shirt and green shorts showing off pasty white calves. His story could be a cautionary tale to any band that harbors illusions of making it big one day. Bissell has been there - the million-dollar contract offer, the swooning music industry executives - and he knows it is fleeting, and often not the path to good music anyway.
NEWS
June 3, 1993
Louis Zingarelli Sr.Lithographer, driverLouis Zingarelli Sr., a lithographer and deliveryman, died Sunday after a heart attack at his home in East Baltimore.The 66-year-old Pulaski Highway resident made deliveries for the Highland Pharmacy for 17 years and earlier had been a lithographer, printing labels on cans for the Continental Can Co. for two decades. He also had worked for the Crown Cork and Seal Co.The East Baltimore native was a graduate of Our Lady of Pompei School and attended Patterson Park High School.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1999
A dismal cluster of vacant properties in Essex has been sold for $1 million, according to government and business leaders who say the deal pumps more optimism into the region's battle to restore economic stability.William H. Bissell, owner of a Parkville bingo hall and auction house, purchased the property this month, said sources familiar with the deal."It's a huge acquisition," said Baltimore County Councilman John Olszewski Sr., whose 7th District includes part of Essex. "People have been waiting for years for this to happen."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 10, 2010
Braden Brook Altemus, a manufacturer's representative of household products and a high school sports enthusiast, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease April 3 at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland. The Towson resident was 83. Born in Johnstown, Pa., he enlisted in the Navy during World War II and was assigned to the University of Virginia, where he earned a naval science degree and played baseball and basketball. He received a degree in 1946 and served aboard a destroyer, the USS Blue with the 19th Fleet Pacific Reserve.
NEWS
February 10, 2003
Jane E. Torr, a retired city social worker and community volunteer, died Thursday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. She was 71 and lived in Parkville, where she was struck by a car Wednesday while crossing Harford Road. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., she graduated from Reading High School in Pennsylvania in 1949, studied science for a year at the University of Rochester, and later earned a bachelor's degree in art and education at the State University of New York - Potsdam. Ms. Torr had planned to be an art teacher, but found social work more gratifying, said her daughter, Dr. Patricia Bissell Zeffert of Pikesville.
NEWS
June 18, 2002
Silas Trim Bissell, 60, a member of the militant 1960s anti-war group the Weathermen who was convicted of trying to bomb a University of Washington ROTC building, died Saturday in Eugene, Ore., of brain cancer. Mr. Bissell was arrested in Eugene in January 1987, nearly 17 years after the failed 1970 bombing attempt in Seattle. He received a two-year sentence on charges of conspiracy to damage federal property and possession of a destructive device, and was released after 18 months. Mr. Bissell was working as a physical therapist and artist under the name Terrence Peter Jackson when an acquaintance informed police of his real identity.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1999
A dismal cluster of vacant properties in Essex has been sold for $1 million, according to government and business leaders who say the deal pumps more optimism into the region's battle to restore economic stability.William H. Bissell, owner of a Parkville bingo hall and auction house, purchased the property this month, said sources familiar with the deal."It's a huge acquisition," said Baltimore County Councilman John Olszewski Sr., whose 7th District includes part of Essex. "People have been waiting for years for this to happen."
NEWS
June 3, 1993
Louis Zingarelli Sr.Lithographer, driverLouis Zingarelli Sr., a lithographer and deliveryman, died Sunday after a heart attack at his home in East Baltimore.The 66-year-old Pulaski Highway resident made deliveries for the Highland Pharmacy for 17 years and earlier had been a lithographer, printing labels on cans for the Continental Can Co. for two decades. He also had worked for the Crown Cork and Seal Co.The East Baltimore native was a graduate of Our Lady of Pompei School and attended Patterson Park High School.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
City and state officials gave Esskay Inc. a plan yesterday intended to keep the meat packing operation in Baltimore, and officials said a decision on the operation's fate could be made in three to four weeks."
NEWS
September 8, 1992
Raymond A. Bissell, founder of Baltimore Heating & Air Conditioning, died Thursday of heart failure at the Roland Park Retirement Community. He was 83.A private memorial service is to be held at Grace United Methodist Church in North Baltimore, where he had been a member and an usher.Born in East Orange, N.J., Mr. Bissell was a 1930 graduate of Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., where he received his undergraduate degree in economics and was a member of Theta Chi fraternity.He spent most of his career in heating and air conditioning and was national sales promotion manager for Bryant Heating and Air Conditioning in Cleveland before moving to Baltimore.
NEWS
July 22, 2007
In Bel Air, on July 22, 1863, Margaret Webster Bissell sat down to write a memoir of her experiences relating to the Battle of Gettysburg and the search, in the days after the July 1863 battle, for her mortally wounded husband, Capt. William R. Bissell. William Bissell was a prominent businessman who owned Bissell's Gover House, a prosperous inn on Bel Air's Main Street. In 1861, he left Bel Air to join the 8th Virginia Infantry Regiment of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, under the command of Gen. George Pickett.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl | December 20, 2004
The Wrens first played the Talking Head in downtown Baltimore 11 years ago, and no one showed up. The New Jersey rock band returned Saturday night, and the place was sold out. Fans squished against the walls of the tiny downtown club and lined the stairs to the second floor. When the band - which plays its live shows fast and loud and messy - launched into the song "Faster Gun," bass player Kevin Whelan tackled singer Charles Bissell to the ground in a bear hug, and the crowd seamlessly stepped in to sing the lyrics.
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