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By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Dallas Morning News Universal Press Syndicate | March 21, 1993
Biscotti, a cross between a cookie and melba toast, are catching the coffee-drinking wave to success."I think it's all kind of tied to the interest in coffee, exotic coffee, dunking," says Marty Friedman, editor of New Product News, of biscotti's newfound popularity."
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | April 9, 2008
With their Italian name, their panoply of flavor options and their crunchy exterior made for dunking, biscotti might seem too exotic to attempt at home. But Shirley Coleman, a chef instructor at Baltimore International College, says that's a misconception. "They're actually very easy to make," she says. "Biscotti reminds me of a sugar cookie, just baked in a different way. You can add anything you like to biscotti - chocolate chips, cranberries." Or citrus zest, which gives these biscotti from Coleman a touch of spring.
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FEATURES
By Charles Britton and Charles Britton,Copley News Service | June 21, 1992
If cooking something produces a tasty dish, wouldn't cooking it twice make it even better? Answer: Maybe so.The idea of double cooking is ancient, and it probably goes back to attempts to preserve food and to reduce waste. When I was in Calcutta some years ago, I stayed at a middle-class hotel that catered to British people and Indian businessmen. The kitchen gave us fresh bread only every few days; the rest of the time, the bread tray held thin slices of toast, parched in the oven until it was fully dried out and brown.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007
Product recalls for the week beginning Nov. 12: Nov. 13 Name of product: Plastic folding chairs Units: About 75,000 Manufacturer: Iceberg Enterprises LLC of Park Ridge, Ill. Hazard: The plastic folding chairs can collapse during use, posing a fall hazard to consumers. Sold at: Office supply retailers nationwide from August 2005 through July 2007 for about $30. Remedy: Consumers should stop using the chairs immediately and contact Iceberg Enterprises to receive a free repair kit with instructions.
FEATURES
By SEATTLE TIMES | March 27, 1996
The following light recipe is from "Great Feasts without Fuss" by Frances McCullough and Barbara Witt.Baked pears with ginger preserves and biscotti6 servings3 medium Bosc pears, ripe without being mushy1 teaspoon margarine or butter1/4 cup ginger preserves (see note)1/2 cup apple juice2 tablespoons lemon juice2 tablespoons raw brown (turbinado) sugar, or light brown sugarstore-bought or homemade biscottiHeat oven to 400 degrees. Cut the pears in half lengthwise. (It is not necessary to peel or remove the stem.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | April 9, 2008
With their Italian name, their panoply of flavor options and their crunchy exterior made for dunking, biscotti might seem too exotic to attempt at home. But Shirley Coleman, a chef instructor at Baltimore International College, says that's a misconception. "They're actually very easy to make," she says. "Biscotti reminds me of a sugar cookie, just baked in a different way. You can add anything you like to biscotti - chocolate chips, cranberries." Or citrus zest, which gives these biscotti from Coleman a touch of spring.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007
Product recalls for the week beginning Nov. 12: Nov. 13 Name of product: Plastic folding chairs Units: About 75,000 Manufacturer: Iceberg Enterprises LLC of Park Ridge, Ill. Hazard: The plastic folding chairs can collapse during use, posing a fall hazard to consumers. Sold at: Office supply retailers nationwide from August 2005 through July 2007 for about $30. Remedy: Consumers should stop using the chairs immediately and contact Iceberg Enterprises to receive a free repair kit with instructions.
FEATURES
By Alison Arnett and Alison Arnett,Boston Globe | March 22, 1992
A taste of something sweet seems obligatory to cap a festive dinner or even a family meal. Going without dessert may be righteous, but it isn't very satisfying.But what's a cook to do when so many guests look askance at a confection called Death by Chocolate, and the alternative fat-free cheesecake recipes are so drab?One culinary sleight of hand is to offer dessert in miniature -- small cookies or cupcakes or small frosted cakes. Although the ingredients are rich, the diminutive size will hold down calories.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 27, 1995
TCThe original biscotto was a twice-cooked bread made from barely leavened dough. The second cooking was to dry it out, making a sort of tough cracker that could be taken on journeys, especially by sailors. "Sea biscuits" of this sort are still sold, mostly as emergency food.By the 14th century or so, biscotto had become the name in Italy for any sort of pastry that was small and crisp, whether cooked twice or not. The recent Grande Enciclopedia Illustrata della Gastronomia defines the word as "a sweet of small dimensions . . . made from flour, water, sugar and shortening with . . . eggs and natural flavorings."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 22, 1996
STAY TUNED FOR a holiday edition of True Facts.Our guests today include Marie Osmond, Kermit the Frog, Miami Dolphins quarterback Dan Marino and the cast from "Les Miz."This special was actually recorded in August with fake snow, VTC fake Christmas trees and everyone sweating to death wearing ski sweaters in front of a fire while surrounded by brightly wrapped empty boxes. But that was the only time Marino and Marie were both available.So, put another log on the fire, push the Christmas wrap aside and settle down for a long winter's nap and facts that are true any season of the year.
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
LANCASTER, Pa. -- On the menu at Gold Cafe on a suburban commercial strip here: coffee, espresso and biscotti. Oh, and self-directed individual retirement accounts. Taking a cue from the large bookstore that cross-sell magazines and lattes, and from Starbucks, which hawks its own brand of caffeinated brew alongside music CDs, Union National Financial Corp. is building branches that bear almost no resemblance to traditional brick-and-mortar bank establishments. The Pennsylvania community bank has opened its first "financial barista," an upscale coffee house that doubles as a full-service bank branch that takes deposits and loan applications.
TRAVEL
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 5, 2003
Today was Pasta Day at the International School of Italian Food and Wine, in Bologna, Italy. Mary Beth Clark was here. She's our teacher. It's her school. Andrea Merlini was here. He's the executive chef from Milan who, with Mary Beth, had been working with us on the art of turning mere ingredients into actual cuisine. Franca was here. I didn't get her last name, but she's the pasta chef from Tuscany, and she did the dough. My four fellow students were here. Earlier in the day, as we were warming up by creating (trust me on this)
FEATURES
By Marcy Goldman and Marcy Goldman,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 31, 2000
Most people approach coffee or tea and an accompanying treat in one of a few ways. Either you are a sip-and-nibble sort, a bite-and-gulp variety, or an eat-first, wash-it-all-down-later type. Where we all converge is in the agreement that the ritual of a coffee break or tea time makes the mundane marvelous. There is nothing like the blahs that can make the average coffee or tea break - always a welcome pause - a virtual oasis. Sure, we count on that caffeine hit when we reach for coffee or a pot of tea; it is just as true that either hot, fragrant brew - along with a little something modestly sweet - is sheer respite, producing a separate and undeniable buzz of well-being without a prescription.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 22, 1996
STAY TUNED FOR a holiday edition of True Facts.Our guests today include Marie Osmond, Kermit the Frog, Miami Dolphins quarterback Dan Marino and the cast from "Les Miz."This special was actually recorded in August with fake snow, VTC fake Christmas trees and everyone sweating to death wearing ski sweaters in front of a fire while surrounded by brightly wrapped empty boxes. But that was the only time Marino and Marie were both available.So, put another log on the fire, push the Christmas wrap aside and settle down for a long winter's nap and facts that are true any season of the year.
FEATURES
By SEATTLE TIMES | March 27, 1996
The following light recipe is from "Great Feasts without Fuss" by Frances McCullough and Barbara Witt.Baked pears with ginger preserves and biscotti6 servings3 medium Bosc pears, ripe without being mushy1 teaspoon margarine or butter1/4 cup ginger preserves (see note)1/2 cup apple juice2 tablespoons lemon juice2 tablespoons raw brown (turbinado) sugar, or light brown sugarstore-bought or homemade biscottiHeat oven to 400 degrees. Cut the pears in half lengthwise. (It is not necessary to peel or remove the stem.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 27, 1995
TCThe original biscotto was a twice-cooked bread made from barely leavened dough. The second cooking was to dry it out, making a sort of tough cracker that could be taken on journeys, especially by sailors. "Sea biscuits" of this sort are still sold, mostly as emergency food.By the 14th century or so, biscotto had become the name in Italy for any sort of pastry that was small and crisp, whether cooked twice or not. The recent Grande Enciclopedia Illustrata della Gastronomia defines the word as "a sweet of small dimensions . . . made from flour, water, sugar and shortening with . . . eggs and natural flavorings."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | August 4, 1993
When Michele Scicolone decided to write a cookbook of Italian sweets, she didn't want her recipes just to produce Italian desserts -- she wanted them to result in Italian home-style desserts."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | August 4, 1993
When Michele Scicolone decided to write a cookbook of Italian sweets, she didn't want her recipes just to produce Italian desserts -- she wanted them to result in Italian home-style desserts."
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Dallas Morning News Universal Press Syndicate | March 21, 1993
Biscotti, a cross between a cookie and melba toast, are catching the coffee-drinking wave to success."I think it's all kind of tied to the interest in coffee, exotic coffee, dunking," says Marty Friedman, editor of New Product News, of biscotti's newfound popularity."
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