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June 22, 2011
Liam Nicholas Hammett Melissa Lescht Hammett and John David Hammett , of Ellicott City, announce the birth of their son, Liam Nicholas Hammett , on May 7, 2011. He weighed 5 pounds, 9 ounces. His grandparents are Stephen and Suzanne Lescht, of Ellicott City; and Frank and Cindy Hammett, of Ellicott City.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 12, 2014
Author Jonathan Eig recalls hearing a rabbi say in a sermon that The Pill was the most important invention of the 20th century and scoffing at that declaration. He could think of half a dozen inventions more important. And besides, who invented it? If The Pill was so important, why wasn't there an Alexander Graham Bell or a Henry Ford story to go with it? Mr. Eig has now written that story. A rollicking, super-secret race against time, the Catholic Church and the federal government run by a disenfranchised scientist, a Catholic gynecologist women instinctively trusted, a woman who championed the pleasure of sex for women and her immensely wealthy friend.
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EXPLORE
July 5, 2011
Laurissa S. and David E. Flowers , of Fort Meade, announce the birth of their daughter, Emma-Claire Lynn Flowers , on June 17, 2011, at 2:27 a.m. She weighed 6 pounds, 15 ounces. Her grandparents are Gary and Cecile Swanson, of Mission Viejo, Calif.; and Phillip and Linda Flowers, of Newbern, Tenn.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Closer Zach Britton will return to the Orioles on Thursday as a new dad. Britton and his wife Courtney became parents to a baby boy named Zander Lee Britton, who was born late Tuesday night in Burbank, Calif. Both baby and mother are resting and doing well. Britton is expected to rejoin the Orioles in time to attend Thursday's workout at Camden Yards before Friday's Game 1 of the American League Championship Series. The Brittons initially received a due date of Oct. 14 and Britton was determined he wasn't going to miss the birth of his first child.
EXPLORE
July 7, 2011
Melissa and Michael Britton , of Columbia, announce the birth of their son, John Michael Britton , on April 19, 2011, at 3:45 p.m. He weighed 7 pounds, 7 ounces. His brothers are Ben and Will. His grandparents are Doug and Debbie Sharp, of Columbia; and Jim and Gingie Britton, of Mount Carmel, Pa.
EXPLORE
July 14, 2011
Kenna and Andrew Hill, of Glen Burnie, announce the birth of their son, Covin Marsden Hill, on June 25, 2011, at 8:01 p.m. He weighed 8 pounds, 7 ounces. His sister is Briella. His grandparents are Maureen Marsden, of Columbia; Thomas Marsden, of Glen Burnie; Steele and Gail Hill, of Columbia; and Lynn Walters, of Orange Park, Fla.
EXPLORE
November 24, 2011
Kimberly and Travis Williams , of Columbia, announce the birth of their son, Brayden Paul Williams , on Oct. 17, 2011, at 8:02 p.m. He weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces. His siblings are Keagan and Landon. His grandparents are Linda Hayden, of Silver Spring; Paul Hayden, of Lititz, Pa.; and Lena Williams, of Reisterstown. Renee and Gary Williams Jr. , of Columbia, announce the birth of their daughter, Jeanne Lillian Williams , on Sept. 8, 2011, at 7:04 p.m. She weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 5, 2013
Johns Hopkins will use a $2 million federal grant to look for new ways to prevent premature births. The Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School was among 27 hospitals nationwide awarded a grant by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services' Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The grants are part of a $41.4 million, four-year initiative called the Strong Start for Mothers and Newborns.  “This initiative will help us find new ways to reduce the rate of preterm births, improve the health outcomes of pregnant women and newborns and decrease the anticipated total cost of medical care during pregnancy and delivery and over the first year of life for children,” Dr. Andrew J. Satin, director of the Hopkins gyn/ob department and chair of the Medical Board at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | September 30, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Subbing for new grandmother Hillary Clinton on late notice, former President Bill Clinton became the star attraction Tuesday night at a fundraiser for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Anthony G. Brown at a posh estate in Potomac. The Brown campaign said the former president helped Brown draw about 450 guests and raise more than $1.2 million for his campaign against Republican Larry Hogan in the Nov. 4 election. Hillary Clinton, the presumed Democratic front-runner for the 2016 presidential nomination, had been the expected headliner at the big-ticket event at an estate in one of Maryland's wealthiest communities.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
A recent exchange within your opinion pages debated the benefit of over-the-counter access to oral contraceptives, with a letter to the editor ( "Sun wrong on OTC birth control," Sept. 16) citing the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as being supportive of recent proposals from Congressional candidates across the country. But there's a disclaimer to our support: while ACOG does believe that many oral contraceptives are safe and effective for over-the-counter use, and we would welcome this new level of access for some women, we strongly believe that this is not enough.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
In what on the surface seems like a remarkable turnaround, a number of conservative Republican Senate candidates this year are supporting a proposal to expand access to birth control by making it available without a prescription as an over-the-counter medication. Wider access to birth control traditionally has been a Democratic issue, so Republicans' sudden embrace of it seems almost too good to be true. Unfortunately, it is. This year four GOP Senate candidates in close races against Democratic incumbents have announced their support for over-the-counter access to birth control: Cory Gardener of Colorado; Thom Tillis of North Carolina; Ed Gillespie of Virgina and Mike McFadden of Minnesota.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Under increasing legal and political pressure, the Obama administration issued a new rule Friday designed to ensure that female employees have access to birth control while accommodating religious employers that object to covering it through their health insurance plans. But the latest attempt at a compromise — which comes in response to recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions — was quickly criticized by religious groups, including the Catonsville-based Little Sisters of the Poor, for not fully addressing their concerns.
HEALTH
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
When eight high school students are commissioned to make a graphic novel about sexual health, don't be surprised if the result includes pet dragons, a troll with genital warts and a guy named Funk Master Flexin'. These comedic touches appear in a booklet created during a six-week summer program for students at the Baltimore City Health Department that aims to raise awareness about sexual health and the department's relocated young adult center in Druid Hill. Meeting twice a week beginning July 8, the students were asked to write, photograph, draw, scan and digitally edit three stories about sexually transmitted diseases and birth control, and assemble them in a booklet.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Stacy Keibler plans to take a special supplement after she gives birth next month -- a pill made from her placenta. The Rosedale native and host of "Supermarket Superstar" is among a growing number of women who are returning to the ancient practice of consuming the placenta , the organ which nourishes the fetus during pregnancy. Most other mammals eat the placenta immediately after birth, as do many women in some Asian and African cultures.  Some believe that consuming the placenta can ward off postpartum depression, boost energy and speed healing, although few studies have been conducted.
NEWS
July 12, 2014
While writer Mike Gesker ( "U.S. food aid still critical abroad," July 10) rightly affirms our commitment to sending food to poor countries, as a member of Catholic Relief Services he fails though to address the other side of this economic problem. In part because of resistance of the Catholic Church to any form of birth control, poor populations are exploding, fueling the demand for more food - and, when food is not available, hunger and more poverty or political dissent. Keep up the supply side, but address reduction in the demand side.
HEALTH
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
A network of Catholic employers is temporarily exempt from the federal government's requirement to provide free birth control coverage for workers, a federal court has ruled. The ruling this week by an Oklahoma judge grants a preliminary injunction for some members of the Catholic Benefits Association, an organization of religious employers that owns an insurance company and is led by Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore. The CBA and other Catholic groups filed a class action lawsuit against the federal government in March, asking to be freed from the Affordable Care Act's requirement to provide contraceptive coverage without a co-pay.
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