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June 22, 2011
Liam Nicholas Hammett Melissa Lescht Hammett and John David Hammett , of Ellicott City, announce the birth of their son, Liam Nicholas Hammett , on May 7, 2011. He weighed 5 pounds, 9 ounces. His grandparents are Stephen and Suzanne Lescht, of Ellicott City; and Frank and Cindy Hammett, of Ellicott City.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Stacy Keibler plans to take a special supplement after she gives birth next month -- a pill made from her placenta. The Rosedale native and host of "Supermarket Superstar" is among a growing number of women who are returning to the ancient practice of consuming the placenta , the organ which nourishes the fetus during pregnancy. Most other mammals eat the placenta immediately after birth, as do many women in some Asian and African cultures.  Some believe that consuming the placenta can ward off postpartum depression, boost energy and speed healing, although few studies have been conducted.
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EXPLORE
July 5, 2011
Laurissa S. and David E. Flowers , of Fort Meade, announce the birth of their daughter, Emma-Claire Lynn Flowers , on June 17, 2011, at 2:27 a.m. She weighed 6 pounds, 15 ounces. Her grandparents are Gary and Cecile Swanson, of Mission Viejo, Calif.; and Phillip and Linda Flowers, of Newbern, Tenn.
NEWS
July 12, 2014
While writer Mike Gesker ( "U.S. food aid still critical abroad," July 10) rightly affirms our commitment to sending food to poor countries, as a member of Catholic Relief Services he fails though to address the other side of this economic problem. In part because of resistance of the Catholic Church to any form of birth control, poor populations are exploding, fueling the demand for more food - and, when food is not available, hunger and more poverty or political dissent. Keep up the supply side, but address reduction in the demand side.
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July 7, 2011
Melissa and Michael Britton , of Columbia, announce the birth of their son, John Michael Britton , on April 19, 2011, at 3:45 p.m. He weighed 7 pounds, 7 ounces. His brothers are Ben and Will. His grandparents are Doug and Debbie Sharp, of Columbia; and Jim and Gingie Britton, of Mount Carmel, Pa.
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July 14, 2011
Kenna and Andrew Hill, of Glen Burnie, announce the birth of their son, Covin Marsden Hill, on June 25, 2011, at 8:01 p.m. He weighed 8 pounds, 7 ounces. His sister is Briella. His grandparents are Maureen Marsden, of Columbia; Thomas Marsden, of Glen Burnie; Steele and Gail Hill, of Columbia; and Lynn Walters, of Orange Park, Fla.
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November 24, 2011
Kimberly and Travis Williams , of Columbia, announce the birth of their son, Brayden Paul Williams , on Oct. 17, 2011, at 8:02 p.m. He weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces. His siblings are Keagan and Landon. His grandparents are Linda Hayden, of Silver Spring; Paul Hayden, of Lititz, Pa.; and Lena Williams, of Reisterstown. Renee and Gary Williams Jr. , of Columbia, announce the birth of their daughter, Jeanne Lillian Williams , on Sept. 8, 2011, at 7:04 p.m. She weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 5, 2013
Johns Hopkins will use a $2 million federal grant to look for new ways to prevent premature births. The Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School was among 27 hospitals nationwide awarded a grant by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services' Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The grants are part of a $41.4 million, four-year initiative called the Strong Start for Mothers and Newborns.  “This initiative will help us find new ways to reduce the rate of preterm births, improve the health outcomes of pregnant women and newborns and decrease the anticipated total cost of medical care during pregnancy and delivery and over the first year of life for children,” Dr. Andrew J. Satin, director of the Hopkins gyn/ob department and chair of the Medical Board at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
A network of Catholic employers is temporarily exempt from the federal government's requirement to provide free birth control coverage for workers, a federal court has ruled. The ruling this week by an Oklahoma judge grants a preliminary injunction for some members of the Catholic Benefits Association, an organization of religious employers that owns an insurance company and is led by Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore. The CBA and other Catholic groups filed a class action lawsuit against the federal government in March, asking to be freed from the Affordable Care Act's requirement to provide contraceptive coverage without a co-pay.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith is a proud new father. Smith's wife, Chanel, gave birth to a son on Friday. He's the couple's first child. The baby's name is Torrey Jeremiah Smith. "Torrey Jeremiah Smith is finally here!!!" Smith wrote on Twitter. " @ LibraLadii_ was a trooper...thanks for your prayers. " At the urging of his wife, Smith posted some baby pictures on Instagram: "I didn't want to pit up pics of the baby but after all she went through yesterday she wins," Smith wrote.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
It's amazing that the only way Hobby Lobby employees can get birth control is by someone else paying for it ( "Don't open Pandora's box," March 24). What is stopping any Hobby Lobby employee from paying for this themselves? I can tell you I paid for my own birth control my entire reproductive life and find ridiculous the entitlement attitude women have today. Diane Campbell - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 28, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments last week about the Affordable Care Act's requirement that employers of a certain size provide health care plans that pay for birth control for women. One of the plaintiffs, Hobby Lobby, a chain of craft stores in the South owned by a religious family, does not object to providing all forms of birth control. The family objects only to the IUD and two drugs commonly known as "the morning after pill" and "the week after pill" because, they believe, this device and these drugs would prevent a fertilized egg from attaching to a woman's uterus.
NEWS
March 16, 2014
There are two glaring fallacies in the editorial "More study needed on birth injury bill" (March 13). The first is that medical malpractice awards affect practice closings. There is no credible evidence to support this. This "medical myth" keeps surfacing, despite lots of evidence to the contrary. The second is that only well to do families will be able to "afford" to hire good attorneys and pay witnesses. Plaintiffs lawyers do not charge clients but take a portion of an award should they win. The real tragedy is that medical malpractice caps limit the ability of malpractice firms to take on cases unless there is a strong likelihood that the award will provide meaningful compensation for the family, plus cover the law firm's expenses, which often run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
Maryland's litigation-based system for compensating families whose children suffered from birth-related neurological industries doesn't work well for anyone. It isn't great for the families, who only get the financial assistance they need if they can convince a jury that health care providers were negligent - and only then after years of litigation and expensive attorney's fees. Doctors and hospitals are faced with the risk of skyrocketing malpractice premiums as a result of jury awards that have recently run into the tens of millions of dollars.
NEWS
By Catherine E. Pugh and Dan K. Morhaim | March 10, 2014
This summer, Gov. Martin O'Malley and public health leaders justly celebrated the fact that infant mortality in our state has been driven to a new record low. By increasing access to care and outreach for new mothers and their babies - particularly in low-income communities - Maryland's infant mortality rate fell by 21 percent between 2008 and 2012. This is a tremendous achievement. But this hard won progress - as well as access for all expectant mothers - is at risk as we confront a looming obstetrics crisis: multi-million dollar medical malpractice judgments that are driving even higher the already high cost of medical liability.
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