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By DAN RODRICKS | December 19, 1997
Wednesday's story about Amy Fischer-Abbott's desire to find the mother who abandoned her on a Pimlico playground in 1966 provoked numerous comments and telephone calls - many of them from readers who have been involved in adoptions, but none so far from Fischer-Abbott's long-gone mother or anyone connected to her.The most interesting reaction came from a 37-year-old Baltimore woman who asked only to be identified as Toby. She offered a personal tale, some observations and warnings that could benefit Fischer-Abbott in her quest.
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 2, 2008
By now we all have a story about a job outsourced beyond our reach in the global economy. My favorite is about the California publisher who hired two reporters in India to cover the Pasadena, Calif., city government. Really. There are times as well when the offshoring of jobs takes on a quite literal meaning. When the labor we are talking about is, well, labor. In the last few months we've had a full nursery of international stories about surrogate mothers. Hundreds of couples are crossing borders in search of lower-cost ways to fill the family business.
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NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 2003
The Hawaii attorney general's office has launched an investigation to determine whether adoptive parents and Medicaid were double-billed for the hospital costs of women flown to the state from the Marshall Islands to give birth and then relinquish their newborn children. Christopher Young, the lawyer who directs the attorney general's Medicaid fraud unit, acknowledged that an investigation focusing on the billing practices of the agencies arranging the adoptions had begun. He said subpoenas had been issued to obtain records of adoptions involving recently arrived Marshallese women but declined to discuss details.
NEWS
By Kimberly Flyr | May 9, 2004
MOTHER'S DAY is normally one day of the year when I feel no ambivalence. As the often exhausted mother of three children, ages 10 years, 8 years and 9 months, I am perfectly clear that I deserve every card and muffin that's heading my way. In past years, I have serenely enjoyed breakfast in bed, fancy brunches and even that rarest of joys - time alone to read. I have graciously accepted gifts of handmade picture frames and pins, and I have received cards praising me in words big and small.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing Writer | June 30, 1992
For Sharon Kingston, May 23 was the day her dream came true.On that day, the 27-year-old Eldersburg resident was reunited with her birth mother for the first time in more than 26 years.Recently, Kingston recalled the dinner meeting.For Kingston's biological mother, 48-year-old Catherine Naghdi of Millersville, the special dinner was bittersweet."When we met, we put our arms around each other, and neither one of us really wanted to let go. I didn't want to let her get away again," Naghdi said.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing Writer | June 28, 1992
ELDERSBURG -- For Sharon Kingston, May 23 was the day her dream came true.On that day, the 27-year-old Eldersburg resident was reunited with her birth mother for the first time in more than 26 years.Recently, Kingston recalled the dinner meeting, which took place at Vellegias Restaurant in Eldersburg."I didn't know what she looked like, but she said I wouldn't have to ask," Kingston said. "I'll never forget it. She walked in the door with two big Mylar balloons; one with a big bear and another, more personalized one that said, 'I love you, Sharon.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN COLUMNIST | December 17, 1997
Three hours after midnight, June 9, 1966, her husband's asthmatic coughing awakened Margaret Smith in their house on Palmer Avenue in Northwest Baltimore, near Pimlico Race Course. The coughing wasn't all that bothered her.Through an open window, Margaret Smith heard a baby cry, and the startling sound seemed to be coming from the Queensberry Playground across the alley behind her house. She called police.Two officers, Manuel Matias and Allen Griffin, came within minutes and discovered a naked infant on a small blanket on the playground.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
For Valerie Shefik, the effort to adopt a second Marshallese child led to what she calls one of the most heart-wrenching experiences of her life. Valerie, 44, and her husband, Robert, 46, first adopted a Marshallese child in late 1997 through the TLC Adoption Agency in Washington state. The boy's adoption was approved by the Arizona courts and went smoothly. Nearly three years later, the Scottsdale, Ariz., couple were exploring the possibility of another adoption when Valerie Shefik got a call from TLC around Thanksgiving, telling her that a 7-year-old Marshallese girl "had to be placed quickly."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
SARASOTA, Fla. - For two families in Florida, the pain of an adoption gone wrong is plainly visible on their faces. Carmen and Darlene Scoma talk sadly about the child from the Marshall Islands they thought they had legally claimed in Hawaii in 1997. For 4 1/2 years, Atina Erakdrik had been their daughter, until they lost her early last year after a bitter court battle. "She's our daughter. She will always be our daughter," says Darlene Scoma, her voice quavering. In Fruitland Park, 130 miles north, Atina's birth mother, Molly Juna, 31, who traveled more than 7,000 miles to reclaim her child, talks about the pain she endured during the protracted court fight.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1997
Ellen Berman and Mitchell Rosenwald met two years ago for the second time in their lives -- and learned that reunions between a birth mother and the child she once placed for adoption can be complicated."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2004
After eight years of frustrating and unsuccessful fertility treatments, Joyce Frost and her husband, Richard, thought they had finally found a guaranteed way to bring a child into their family - the adoption of a newborn from the Marshall Islands. The Marietta, N.Y., couple paid a fee of $21,500 to Southern Adoption, a nonprofit agency based in Philadelphia, Miss., that promised them an infant in a short time with minimum problems, they said. The birth mother named Mera, they were told, was due March 16 and had already been flown to Hawaii to deliver her baby.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2003
The story sounded bizarre to Michael Jenkins, head of the Marshall Islands' newly created Central Adoption Authority. But his recent experience convinced him that it was also plausible. A pregnant young woman from the Marshall Islands had traveled to Hawaii to visit friends and family. Shortly after her arrival, she was approached by an agent from an adoption agency, and she signed over her unborn child for adoption. "It sounded aggressive, almost predator-like," said Jenkins, recounting the complaint registered recently with his agency by a relative of the expectant mother.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 2003
The Hawaii attorney general's office has launched an investigation to determine whether adoptive parents and Medicaid were double-billed for the hospital costs of women flown to the state from the Marshall Islands to give birth and then relinquish their newborn children. Christopher Young, the lawyer who directs the attorney general's Medicaid fraud unit, acknowledged that an investigation focusing on the billing practices of the agencies arranging the adoptions had begun. He said subpoenas had been issued to obtain records of adoptions involving recently arrived Marshallese women but declined to discuss details.
NEWS
November 4, 2003
A MOTHER takes $300 in spending money and gives up her baby, not understanding that the child is lost to her for good. Another says an adoption agent told her she would shame her family if she didn't go through with the adoption. Luckily for the second mother, the adopting family saw her pain and sent her and her baby back home together. But many adoption stories of babies conceived in the Marshall Islands hold mischief and pain for both sides, as The Sun's Walter F. Roche Jr. reported Sunday and Monday.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
For Valerie Shefik, the effort to adopt a second Marshallese child led to what she calls one of the most heart-wrenching experiences of her life. Valerie, 44, and her husband, Robert, 46, first adopted a Marshallese child in late 1997 through the TLC Adoption Agency in Washington state. The boy's adoption was approved by the Arizona courts and went smoothly. Nearly three years later, the Scottsdale, Ariz., couple were exploring the possibility of another adoption when Valerie Shefik got a call from TLC around Thanksgiving, telling her that a 7-year-old Marshallese girl "had to be placed quickly."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
SARASOTA, Fla. - For two families in Florida, the pain of an adoption gone wrong is plainly visible on their faces. Carmen and Darlene Scoma talk sadly about the child from the Marshall Islands they thought they had legally claimed in Hawaii in 1997. For 4 1/2 years, Atina Erakdrik had been their daughter, until they lost her early last year after a bitter court battle. "She's our daughter. She will always be our daughter," says Darlene Scoma, her voice quavering. In Fruitland Park, 130 miles north, Atina's birth mother, Molly Juna, 31, who traveled more than 7,000 miles to reclaim her child, talks about the pain she endured during the protracted court fight.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | March 13, 1997
To understand Hassan Booker's unique family background, start with the initials he inscribed on his Navy basketball shoes."JAB" stands for the late Joyce Astarte Booker, his biological aunt, who died of lung cancer in 1989."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2004
After eight years of frustrating and unsuccessful fertility treatments, Joyce Frost and her husband, Richard, thought they had finally found a guaranteed way to bring a child into their family - the adoption of a newborn from the Marshall Islands. The Marietta, N.Y., couple paid a fee of $21,500 to Southern Adoption, a nonprofit agency based in Philadelphia, Miss., that promised them an infant in a short time with minimum problems, they said. The birth mother named Mera, they were told, was due March 16 and had already been flown to Hawaii to deliver her baby.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2003
Italian scientists announced yesterday that they have created the first cloned horse, raising the possibility that breeders might someday churn out genetic duplicates of champion equines, while heartbroken owners will be able to bring beloved old mounts back to life. The cloned foal - dubbed Prometea - was born May 28 at the Laboratory of Reproductive Technology in Cremona. A Haflinger with a splash of white down its nose, the horse already weighs more than 220 pounds. "She's great and growing up fast," said Cesare Galli, the laboratory director and head of the cloning team.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2002
Gale Monahan had an experience Thursday evening that some adoptees only dream of. She met her sister Teresa Muse, 47, for the first time in her life. The tearful meeting at Baltimore-Washington International Airport was a pivotal moment in a series of recent events that have introduced Monahan to a long-secret family, including two half-sisters and a half-brother. An avid trail rider, Monahan, 51, lives on Mink Hollow Road, just north of the Patuxent River in a rural corner of Howard County, with her husband and two horses.
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