Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBirth Defects
IN THE NEWS

Birth Defects

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | July 25, 1995
Sixty million American women of childbearing age are at risk for having a baby with easily preventable birth defects.Many women want to have babies, but for some it happens sooner than they expect. In the United States, half of all pregnancies are unplanned, and one of every 20 girls becomes pregnant the first time she has sexual intercourse.Within 28 days of conception, before a woman has missed her menstrual period, the baby's brain and spinal column are completely formed. It's already too late to take the simple nutritional steps that will prevent two serious birth defects -- known as neural tube defects -- that happen to one of every 1,000 infants born in the United States.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Josh Vitale, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
A little more than five years ago, Ryan Henderson was nearing the peak of the sport he loved the most. He had won his race the night before, and he was just a day away from turning professional in motorcycle racing. But Henderson would never earn the professional status he coveted. Racing along the Seaford, Del., track's dirt surface, Henderson caught his foot in a hole and was ripped away from his bike. The fall broke his neck and back, paralyzing him from the chest down. He spent the next month in the hospital, and he said it took him four years of rehab to "rebuild myself.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Bloomberg News | June 28, 2007
Use of antidepressants by pregnant women doesn't significantly increase the risk of birth defects, with rare exceptions, two studies found. The overall risk of having a child with a defect increased by less than 1 percent in women on the drugs, including Pfizer Inc.'s Zoloft, GlaxoSmithKline PLC's Paxil and Forest Laboratories Inc.'s Celexa, according to research published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. As many as one in five pregnant women has symptoms of depression, according to the American Pregnancy Association, a Texas-based nonprofit organization.
NEWS
January 30, 2013
A growing body of research underscores that pesticides impact not just public health but also the Chesapeake Bay ("Report finds widespread contaminants in the bay," Jan. 22). A recent federal report, created in response to the same presidential executive order that created the current Chesapeake Bay restoration plan, also noted serious data gaps about pesticides widely dispersed in the bay. The 2013 Maryland Pesticide Information Act addresses the essential need for state and health experts to have access to important basic information on when and where potentially toxic chemicals are applied by pesticide applicators.
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | February 13, 1991
Intensive management of diabetes in women before they conceive may substantially reduce their risk of bearing children with birth defects, researchers reported today.Infants of diabetic women who began treatment before they became pregnant had significantly fewer abnormalities, according to the results of a study published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association.The findings were based on a study of 84 diabetic women who began intensive diabetes treatment before pregnancy and another group of 110 who were six to 30 weeks pregnant before treatment began.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | June 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court raised the prospect yesterday that families with children born with deformed arms, legs, hands and feet may have a chance -- after years of frustration in the courts -- to prove that a major drug company's product was to blame.In a unanimous ruling, the court opened the federal courts to hear more scientists and doctors give their opinions about how birth defects, diseases or injuries were caused -- perhaps linking them to such things as medicines, surgery, industrial chemicals and faulty products.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | November 17, 1992
Q: What is a hare lip and what can be done about it? We were told a cousin's baby was born with one, and we're embarrassed to ask.A: You have probably heard the term "cleft lip" used for this mild birth defect. Early in development, the upper lip and roof of the mouth are formed when tissue growing in from each side of the face meets tissue growing down from the nose. If the parts don't grow together properly, there will be an indentation or defect in the upper lip. Sometimes the defect continues all the way up into the nostril and even involves the roof of the mouth (cleft palate)
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court moved yesterday into the midst of the long legal battle over a pregnancy drug, no longer in use, that some experts claim was a cause of birth defects in many children.By taking on a significant new case about the morning-sickness drug Bendectin in a brief order, the court also put itself in a position to rule on one of the Bush administration's election-year complaints against lawyers.That complaint, repeated often by Vice President Dan Quayle, is that lawyers use "junk science" to try to sway juries to bring in verdicts against drug companies and other manufacturers of consumer products.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | January 19, 1992
MATAMOROS, Mexico -- On one side of Ernestina Sanchez de Martinez's street is the Retzloff pesticide plant, emitting pungent fumes in which her children play. A chemical leak in 1983 forced authorities to empty the area, destroy pets and bury wash hanging on clothes lines.On the other side of Mrs. Sanchez's street is the U.S.-owned Stepan plant, which makes foaming agents for shampoos. The plant has a history of illegally dumping waste. Last summer, a few days after neighbors were given a goodwill tour, a mixing tank exploded, shattering windows and confidence.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | August 6, 1991
SACRAMENTO -- California officials reversed themselves yesterday, warning that the chemical that spilled into the Sacramento River three weeks ago near Dunsmuir may cause birth defects and urging pregnant women in the area to seek testing.The announcement, which came two weeks after officials said that there was no evidence that metam sodium could cause birth defects, stems from a review of data stored in secret files at the California Department of Food and Agriculture for several years, officials said.
NEWS
By Max Romano | February 14, 2012
Each year in Maryland, approximately 75,000 women unintentionally become pregnant. Of those pregnancies, about 36,000 end in abortions and 8,000 end in miscarriages. Additionally, many unintended pregnancies lead to premature births, low birthweight babies and poor maternal health outcomes. Almost all of these unintended pregnancies are preventable with modern contraception, which should be readily available for every American. We, as medical students at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, strongly disagree with any employer - religious or otherwise - that would refuse to provide full insurance coverage, including contraception, for its employees.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2011
When Donna Stiener needed a valve replaced in her heart, she knew exactly where she would go: Johns Hopkins Hospital, more than 150 miles from her home in Easton, Pa. The common surgery could have been handled at other hospitals. But Hopkins surgeons had saved her life six decades earlier with their pioneering treatment for "blue babies" — those starved for oxygen by a heart defect called tetralogy of Fallot. And ever since, she had insisted on returning for treatment, making sure each time to pause for a prayer at a statue of Jesus in the rotunda.
NEWS
May 18, 2009
Study: Ginger capsules ease chemotherapy nausea Ginger, long used as a folk remedy for soothing stomach aches, helped tame one of the most dreaded side effects of cancer treatment - nausea from chemotherapy, the first large study to test the herb for this has found. People who started taking ginger capsules several days before a chemo infusion had fewer and less-severe bouts of nausea afterward than others who were given dummy capsules, the federally funded study found. "We were slightly beside ourselves" to see how much it helped, said study leader Julie Ryan of the University of Rochester in New York.
NEWS
By Bloomberg News | June 28, 2007
Use of antidepressants by pregnant women doesn't significantly increase the risk of birth defects, with rare exceptions, two studies found. The overall risk of having a child with a defect increased by less than 1 percent in women on the drugs, including Pfizer Inc.'s Zoloft, GlaxoSmithKline PLC's Paxil and Forest Laboratories Inc.'s Celexa, according to research published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. As many as one in five pregnant women has symptoms of depression, according to the American Pregnancy Association, a Texas-based nonprofit organization.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2006
Water sloshed back and forth in a tinted fish tank as Elim Hong carried it into a lab at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The graduate student collected zebrafish embryos from the bottom of the tank and placed them in small dishes. She handed them off to Rachel Brewster, who slid them under a microscope. "The mutated embryos have an inflated ventricle," said Brewster, an assistant professor of biological sciences at UMBC, as she peered into the microscope. "And you can see numerous cells that are detached from the walls of the neural tube and are populating space."
NEWS
April 2, 2006
Every year, about 450 children are born with serious birth defects in Maryland, and that number is rising. A proposal approved by the House of Delegates last week could help reduce these instances by requiring the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to provide low-income women with free multivitamins and mineral dietary supplements that contain folic acid, a B vitamin that significantly reduces birth defects. The legislation is good public policy that could also save the state millions in subsidized health care costs.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 19, 1992
Women in the first month of pregnancy should stay away from hot tubs and spas to protect their fetuses from developing birth defects, physicians warn.Women who are exposed to such heat sources early in pregnancy have two to three times the normal risk of having a child with spina bifida or other neural tube defects, according to a report in today's s Journal of the American Medical Association. The finding appears to confirm earlier but unsubstantiated reports and anecdotal evidence.In addition to using a hot tub, if the mother-to-be also runs a fever caused by an infection during the first month, the total risk can be as much as six times higher than normal, according to results of the largest study of birth defects so far undertaken.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
Every year, about 450 children are born with serious birth defects in Maryland, and that number is rising. A proposal approved by the House of Delegates last week could help reduce these instances by requiring the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to provide low-income women with free multivitamins and mineral dietary supplements that contain folic acid, a B vitamin that significantly reduces birth defects. The legislation is good public policy that could also save the state millions in subsidized health care costs.
NEWS
By MARY BETH KOZAK and MARY BETH KOZAK,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
On the wall of Chris Crowe's bedroom is a poster of former major league pitcher Jim Abbott, with a quote that reads, "I work very hard and I felt that I could play the game and the only thing that could stop me was myself." For Crowe, a junior reserve outfielder for Havre de Grace, Abbott's words are an inspiration. Abbott was born without a right hand and went on to have a 10-year career in the majors. Similar to Abbott, Crowe only has full use of one arm due to a birth defect. Though Crowe has both hands, he has very limited use of his left hand, which is about a third of the size of his right.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II and THOMAS H. MAUGH II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 2006
Nearly 8 million children each year are born with birth defects that are genetic in origin, and fully 70 percent of them could be prevented or mitigated, according to the first worldwide study commissioned by the March of Dimes. In the absence of treatment, at least 3.3 million of the children die before the age of 5, while 3.2 million are disabled for life, according to the study released yesterday. "Our report identifies for the first time the severe and previously hidden global toll of birth defects," said Dr. Jennifer L. Howse, president of the March of Dimes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.