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Birth Control

NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 5, 2009
The Pill earned its capital letters in my house when my mother found mine after my freshman year in college. The packet had been designed to resemble a woman's compact so that birth control could be discreet. But I was a flower child and we didn't wear makeup, so I hid mine between the mattress and the box springs of my bed. I think my mother was looking for trouble. "You know," she said hotly. "Your father and I never relied on artificial means. We relied on prayer." "Mom," I said, with just as much heat.
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NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., who has never met a domestic federal program he would not double, hit upon what seemed like a great idea for advertising the virtues of federal welfare programs.He invited Whoopi Goldberg -- one of America's most famous former welfare mothers -- to the Capitol to make a pitch for Aid to Families With Dependent Children.Not for Mr. Kennedy and Ms. Goldberg the usual staid style of congressional testimony. Instead, Whoopi put on a Phil Donahue-style show complete with cordless mike and invited guests.
NEWS
March 22, 1991
When Norplant, a surgical birth-control implant, was introduced, its relative high cost -- $500 -- was a drawback. But now Maryland's largest health-care providers are covering this birth-control option. The state will pick up the $500 tab for Medicaid patients. Blue Cross and Blue Shield and two health maintenance organizations are covering the device, too. "Everything points to this being a real advance in controlling unwanted pregnancies," said Dr. Arthur Keefe of Blue Cross. Uninsured women may also get help: Planned Parenthood is exploring ways to defray the cost for them.
FEATURES
By New York Times Syndication | April 20, 1993
Birth control is an important issue that affects a woman's overall health, says Dr. Ronald Chez, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of South Florida in Tampa.When a woman is weighing contraceptive options, she needs to consider any health conditions she has had in the past, such as overweight, high cholesterol, anemia or an abnormal Pap-smearresult.Dr. Chez also believes the following issues should be part of any doctor/patient discussion about birth control: frequency of intercourse, number of sexual partners, risk of exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, degree of reliability a woman demands from a contraceptive and interest in future pregnancies.
NEWS
By Janet Rosenbaum | January 16, 2009
It's a paradox worthy of the federal government: Abstinence-only education inhibits the effective promotion of abstinence. It is possible to keep teens abstinent, at least temporarily. More than a dozen programs have been shown, in peer-reviewed studies, to delay teen sex. For example, the Becoming a Responsible Teen program helped low-income African-American teenagers in Mississippi both to delay sex and to have safer sex, and its effects were visible one year later: Only 12 percent of sexually inexperienced participants became sexually active, compared with 31 percent in the comparison group.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1999
Robert E. Hunt, a former Roman Catholic priest who became known nationally in the 1960s for his public disagreement with Pope Paul VI's teaching on birth control, died Thursday at his Homeland residence of acute myeloid leukemia. He was 65.A North Baltimore resident since 1984, Mr. Hunt was born and raised in Newark, N.J. After graduating from Seton Hall University in 1954, he studied for the priesthood at the Vatican. He was ordained in 1957 and spent three years in Rome earning a doctoral degree in sacred theology.
NEWS
By Judith Bolton-Fasman | July 31, 1994
Carole R. McCann demonstrates in this book that early birth control politics attracted strange bedfellows. Dr. McCann, who teaches American studies at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, attempts to establish that feminist participation in the birth control movement was eclipsed by politics, cultural anxiety and ultimately sexism.Feminists of the era, those whom she labels "welfare feminists," were more concerned with "Americanizing" immigrants, remaining mute about women's birth control needs in order to avoid confronting the inherent sexuality of the topic.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | November 1, 1990
Criticizing the distribution of condoms in seven Baltimore public schools as "ineffective and even counterproductive," Roman Catholic leaders have challenged Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to address moral values instead."
NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | February 18, 1991
If Charlie Scott and other student leaders were writing Howard County's new sex education curriculum, they would bring condoms into the classrooms and show 11th- and 12th-graders how to use them.If Barbara Adams and other conservative parents were in charge, they would urge students to practice the only foolproof and, in their view, moral method of birth control -- holding onto their virginity until they get married.The gulf between the calls for contraceptive kits and abstinence demonstrates the challenge facing Howard school administrators as they draft a new sex education curriculum for ninth graders.
NEWS
By Michele Kayal and Michele Kayal,Special to The Sun | July 6, 1994
PRAGUE, Czech Republic -- Five years ago, Eastern Europe had revolutions in its streets. Now it's having them in its pharmacies.Contraception, so long spurned in this part of the world as unhealthy, uncomfortable and just a great bother, is now in vogue as couples in the former East Bloc abandon abortion as their primary means of birth control."
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