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Birth Control

NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 3, 2010
The Pill turns 50 this month, and I swear I am feeling every one of those years. For me, that little disc of pink and white birth control pills has morphed into one of those day-of-the-week pill storage containers that's filled with all sorts of medicines, none of which holds the promise of a wild night of sex. The Pill is now "the pills," and they hold out hope of less joint pain and less risk of clogged arteries and dying of a sudden heart...
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FEATURES
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- Across the mahogany-paneled lobby, up the elevator to the 15th floor, the door opens into the world of Carl Djerassi, the renowned inventor of the birth control pill, who is now trying to make his mark as a novelist.As the owner of both the sumptuous apartments on the floor, Djerassi has taken command of the entryway and created a stunner: Walls and ceiling are cobalt blue, studded with symbols that pay tribute to his life and loves. Painted like a constellation is the chemical structure of the oral contraceptive.
NEWS
March 22, 1991
When Norplant, a surgical birth-control implant, was introduced, its relative high cost -- $500 -- was a drawback. But now Maryland's largest health-care providers are covering this birth-control option. The state will pick up the $500 tab for Medicaid patients. Blue Cross and Blue Shield and two health maintenance organizations are covering the device, too. "Everything points to this being a real advance in controlling unwanted pregnancies," said Dr. Arthur Keefe of Blue Cross. Uninsured women may also get help: Planned Parenthood is exploring ways to defray the cost for them.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 5, 2009
The Pill earned its capital letters in my house when my mother found mine after my freshman year in college. The packet had been designed to resemble a woman's compact so that birth control could be discreet. But I was a flower child and we didn't wear makeup, so I hid mine between the mattress and the box springs of my bed. I think my mother was looking for trouble. "You know," she said hotly. "Your father and I never relied on artificial means. We relied on prayer." "Mom," I said, with just as much heat.
FEATURES
By New York Times Syndication | April 20, 1993
Birth control is an important issue that affects a woman's overall health, says Dr. Ronald Chez, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of South Florida in Tampa.When a woman is weighing contraceptive options, she needs to consider any health conditions she has had in the past, such as overweight, high cholesterol, anemia or an abnormal Pap-smearresult.Dr. Chez also believes the following issues should be part of any doctor/patient discussion about birth control: frequency of intercourse, number of sexual partners, risk of exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, degree of reliability a woman demands from a contraceptive and interest in future pregnancies.
NEWS
By Janet Rosenbaum | January 16, 2009
It's a paradox worthy of the federal government: Abstinence-only education inhibits the effective promotion of abstinence. It is possible to keep teens abstinent, at least temporarily. More than a dozen programs have been shown, in peer-reviewed studies, to delay teen sex. For example, the Becoming a Responsible Teen program helped low-income African-American teenagers in Mississippi both to delay sex and to have safer sex, and its effects were visible one year later: Only 12 percent of sexually inexperienced participants became sexually active, compared with 31 percent in the comparison group.
NEWS
By Judith Bolton-Fasman | July 31, 1994
Carole R. McCann demonstrates in this book that early birth control politics attracted strange bedfellows. Dr. McCann, who teaches American studies at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, attempts to establish that feminist participation in the birth control movement was eclipsed by politics, cultural anxiety and ultimately sexism.Feminists of the era, those whom she labels "welfare feminists," were more concerned with "Americanizing" immigrants, remaining mute about women's birth control needs in order to avoid confronting the inherent sexuality of the topic.
NEWS
December 14, 1990
For the first time in three decades, American women have access to a new, effective birth control option offering greater control over their reproductive lives and the possibility of quelling the furor over abortion. Norplant, a surgical implant approved by the Food and Drug Administration this week, is in essence a new way of introducing pregnancy-preventing hormones into a woman's system. Its effectiveness and longevity make it far superior to existing methods.A small fan-like arrangement of soft tubes implanted under a woman's skin protects against pregnancy for five years and can be easily removed once a woman decides to conceive.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | July 26, 1994
Q: I've heard from friends about birth-control shots. Can you tell me what they are, and is it OK for a 15-year-old to get them?A: What you are referring to is a new form of birth control that has recently been approved by the Food and DrugAdministration. This form of birth control contains a chemical (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate or DMPA) very similar to the female hormone progesterone.It is manufactured in a liquid form that is injected into the muscle. The hormone is then very slowly absorbed into the bloodstream and provides protection against pregnancy for approximately 12 weeks.
NEWS
December 30, 1991
The disposition of the condom issue in Baltimore is an example of good sense prevailing over hysteria and wrong-headed perceptions. When it became widely known that Baltimore's health department was dispensing birth control pills and condoms at some city schools, some parents and clerics were upset. They felt the schools were not only out of bounds, but sending a dangerous message that teen sex is permissible.Now, little more than a year after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke quietly made the decision to dispense birth control devices in eight clinics in city schools, there are promising signs the decision was correct.
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