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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | February 16, 2012
I can't believe that I actually agree with something President Barack Obama has done. Granted, I'm one of those conservatives who has never subscribed to the full-meal-deal checklist, preferring to critically consider whether each of my positions is the most logical and sensible given the available information and my own values. Usually that process results in coming down on the "right" side of things. In this case, though, I somehow find myself in the odd position of agreeing with Mr. Obama and being rather miffed at his opponents.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 12, 2014
Author Jonathan Eig recalls hearing a rabbi say in a sermon that The Pill was the most important invention of the 20th century and scoffing at that declaration. He could think of half a dozen inventions more important. And besides, who invented it? If The Pill was so important, why wasn't there an Alexander Graham Bell or a Henry Ford story to go with it? Mr. Eig has now written that story. A rollicking, super-secret race against time, the Catholic Church and the federal government run by a disenfranchised scientist, a Catholic gynecologist women instinctively trusted, a woman who championed the pleasure of sex for women and her immensely wealthy friend.
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NEWS
March 28, 2012
Regarding the recent debate on birth control pills and their morality, if a Roman Catholic woman can afford to buy the pills and then uses them, is she a sinner? No one seems to address this conundrum. Given their ability to purchase the pill, how do Christian women who use birth control against the rules of their religion rationalize that decision? One way is a perpetual confession of one's sins, which suggests hypocrisy. Another is to stand up and challenge one's religion.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
A recent exchange within your opinion pages debated the benefit of over-the-counter access to oral contraceptives, with a letter to the editor ( "Sun wrong on OTC birth control," Sept. 16) citing the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as being supportive of recent proposals from Congressional candidates across the country. But there's a disclaimer to our support: while ACOG does believe that many oral contraceptives are safe and effective for over-the-counter use, and we would welcome this new level of access for some women, we strongly believe that this is not enough.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
It's amazing that the only way Hobby Lobby employees can get birth control is by someone else paying for it ( "Don't open Pandora's box," March 24). What is stopping any Hobby Lobby employee from paying for this themselves? I can tell you I paid for my own birth control my entire reproductive life and find ridiculous the entitlement attitude women have today. Diane Campbell - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | February 16, 2012
Where are the women? In the extreme and ill-tempered debate over the availability of contraceptives for women, we have heard from the president, the bishops of the Roman Catholic Church, the Republican presidential candidates, members if Congress and various talking heads on TV. All of them, so far as I can tell, are men. Men discussing the reproductive rights of women. Where are the women? Even Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius was silent as she stood next to President Barack Obama when he announced what he hoped would be a compromise in insurance coverage of contraceptives.
NEWS
February 20, 2012
Susan Reimer 's moral indignation regarding the dearth of women's responses to the political furor over birth control is misplaced ("In birth control debate, where are the women's voices?" Feb. 16). Women are not speaking out because birth control availability is not the issue, religious freedom is. President Barack Obama reneged on a promise to faith-based organizations that they would not have to violate their religious beliefs when providing health care coverage for their employees.
NEWS
July 27, 1993
In 1968, when Pope Paul VI issued an encyclical upholding the Catholic Church's ban on artificial means of birth control, talk of a population explosion was frequently countered by arguments that impressive advances in food production proved the Earth could easily accommodate the expected growth. Now, 25 years later, the signs are not encouraging. Sometime soon, the Earth will reach its "carrying capacity," the point at which its resources cannot sustain greater numbers of people.Many people who watch critical indicators think this point is now within sight.
NEWS
November 21, 1990
The disclosure that Baltimore's health department dispenses birth control pills and condoms at seven city schools has upset some parents and clerics. Schools are supposed to educate, not pass on moral judgments, they contend, adding that dispensing birth control not only crosses that line but sends the dangerous message that teen sex is permissible.Such concerns are understandable. Changing mores, together with alarming increases in teen pregnancies and venereal disease, are frightening realities.
NEWS
January 4, 1994
Conventional wisdom has its uses. Relied on too glibly, however, it can blind us to richer understandings of reality. Such is the case with the usual demographic explanations for population growth.Demographers have long linked falling fertility rates to rising economic prosperity. There is ample evidence that prosperity brings with it a lower birth rate, lower death rates and a relatively stable population. For years, this thinking helped shape foreign-aid policies. The idea was to jump-start economies of impoverished countries, then wait for soaring birthrates to fall as the development strategy took hold.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
In what on the surface seems like a remarkable turnaround, a number of conservative Republican Senate candidates this year are supporting a proposal to expand access to birth control by making it available without a prescription as an over-the-counter medication. Wider access to birth control traditionally has been a Democratic issue, so Republicans' sudden embrace of it seems almost too good to be true. Unfortunately, it is. This year four GOP Senate candidates in close races against Democratic incumbents have announced their support for over-the-counter access to birth control: Cory Gardener of Colorado; Thom Tillis of North Carolina; Ed Gillespie of Virgina and Mike McFadden of Minnesota.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Under increasing legal and political pressure, the Obama administration issued a new rule Friday designed to ensure that female employees have access to birth control while accommodating religious employers that object to covering it through their health insurance plans. But the latest attempt at a compromise — which comes in response to recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions — was quickly criticized by religious groups, including the Catonsville-based Little Sisters of the Poor, for not fully addressing their concerns.
HEALTH
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
When eight high school students are commissioned to make a graphic novel about sexual health, don't be surprised if the result includes pet dragons, a troll with genital warts and a guy named Funk Master Flexin'. These comedic touches appear in a booklet created during a six-week summer program for students at the Baltimore City Health Department that aims to raise awareness about sexual health and the department's relocated young adult center in Druid Hill. Meeting twice a week beginning July 8, the students were asked to write, photograph, draw, scan and digitally edit three stories about sexually transmitted diseases and birth control, and assemble them in a booklet.
NEWS
July 12, 2014
While writer Mike Gesker ( "U.S. food aid still critical abroad," July 10) rightly affirms our commitment to sending food to poor countries, as a member of Catholic Relief Services he fails though to address the other side of this economic problem. In part because of resistance of the Catholic Church to any form of birth control, poor populations are exploding, fueling the demand for more food - and, when food is not available, hunger and more poverty or political dissent. Keep up the supply side, but address reduction in the demand side.
HEALTH
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
A network of Catholic employers is temporarily exempt from the federal government's requirement to provide free birth control coverage for workers, a federal court has ruled. The ruling this week by an Oklahoma judge grants a preliminary injunction for some members of the Catholic Benefits Association, an organization of religious employers that owns an insurance company and is led by Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore. The CBA and other Catholic groups filed a class action lawsuit against the federal government in March, asking to be freed from the Affordable Care Act's requirement to provide contraceptive coverage without a co-pay.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
It's amazing that the only way Hobby Lobby employees can get birth control is by someone else paying for it ( "Don't open Pandora's box," March 24). What is stopping any Hobby Lobby employee from paying for this themselves? I can tell you I paid for my own birth control my entire reproductive life and find ridiculous the entitlement attitude women have today. Diane Campbell - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | January 10, 1995
Q: I have been on birth control pills for almost two years, since I was 15. Should I go off them for a while to make sure my system is OK?A: When birth control pills first became available, doctors suggested that women stop taking them periodically to give their bodies a rest and, as your question suggests, make sure everything is OK. Now that we have much more experience with these pills and know more about how they work and how they affect a teen-ager's body,...
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
A Catonsville-based group of nuns on Monday filed an appeal in a case centered on the federal health care law's requirement to provide contraceptive coverage for employees. The Little Sisters of the Poor oppose birth control on religious grounds and sued last year to challenge the rule. Although the law provides exceptions for churches, the nuns were not automatically exempt from the requirement. In January, the Supreme Court issued a temporary injunction shielding the organization from the requirement, and the Little Sisters are appealing to 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver to extend that protection.
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