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July 30, 1991
CURRENT volunteers' news and needs:Carrie Murray Outdoor Education Campus wants volunteers 18 and older to work with injured birds of prey and assist with nature classes and workshops between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. daily. Training will be offered. Call 396-0808.Saint Vincent's Center for child and family care needs volunteers at its Chara House in Baltimore. It is a group home for infants and toddlers with AIDS. Call Janet Weisman, 252-4000.Howard County Department of Citizen Services wants volunteers to teach or help in ceramic classes, in the Rumsey Road office, wellness tests, senior information and assistance at the Florence Bain Center and Homebound Support program.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
KEMPTON, Pa. - These are exciting times on the wind-swept ridge of Blue Mountain, both in the sky and down below. Migrating hawks draft on rising thermals, saving energy as they head for their winter digs. Their every move is being followed by hundreds of binocular- and camera-toting humans, who marvel at the grace and acrobatics. At Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, it stands to reason that the hawks are being watched like, well, hawks. The mountain is only 1,475 feet tall by my GPS unit, but its location along the Atlantic Flyway means the air is a superhighway for southbound birds of prey, including golden eagles (more about them in a moment)
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 29, 1994
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Dumbo thinks Betty O'Leary is his mate for life.Dumbo is a barred owl. Ms. O'Leary, an education assistant at the Carolina Raptor Center, is a human. As much as Ms. O'Leary loves working with birds of prey, it just isn't in the cards, Dumbo.Dumbo's fixation with Ms. O'Leary is his disability; it is the reason he will never leave the center.Hootie is also a barred owl. He is free because of the love of the eight paid staffers and 100 volunteers at the Raptor Center, just outside Charlotte.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
Birds -- Artist Ernie Muehlmatt is showing his life-size and miniature wooden sculptures of birds (one of which is shown above) at Patuxent Research Refuge's John Hollingsworth Art Gallery in the National Wildlife Visitor Center until early next month. During a 25-year career, he has made more than 6,000 carvings of songbirds, wildfowl and birds of prey. Showing with him is sculptor and painter John Neal Mullican, a featured sculptor/carver at the Chesapeake Wildlife Art Expo, Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and other venues.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | December 2, 1991
Master falconer Kitty Marconi stood in the rain yesterday in Annapolis, tending to three falcons as she talked about the lure of falconry.The demonstration, about the ancient Persian method of using birds to hunt game, brought about 30 people out in the drizzle. Wide-eyed children lined the porch of the Wild Bird Center on Annapolis Street, watching as Marconi stood in the rain and showed them how she hoods the falcons.As she slipped blue-green leather hoods over the heads of the falcons, or hawks, one small boy explained the procedure to another.
FEATURES
By Rick Porter and Rick Porter,ZAP2IT | December 2, 2002
LOS ANGELES - A different kind of hero is moving to Wednesday nights on WB. Starting in January, Angel will move from Sunday nights to 9 p.m. Wednesdays, replacing the canceled Birds of Prey. The reality show High School Reunion, from Bachelor producer Mike Fleiss, will take the 9 p.m. Sunday spot for January and February. After debuting to an audience of more than 7 million, female-superhero series Birds of Prey has steadily lost viewers since then, falling to an average of about 5 million for the season.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 1997
Ranger Bill Offutt needs more volunteer feeders and more money for bird groceries in the second year of Downs Memorial Park's Adopt-An-Owl program.A Friends of Downs Park volunteer group set up a fund a year ago to help feed injured birds of prey that live in the park's raptor cage and aviary.More than $500 has been collected, but that is not much, considering the cost of feed and supplies.According to Offutt, an owl consumes 12 to 18 rodents a day -- at an estimated cost of 45 cents a mouse.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2001
HAWK MOUNTAIN, Pa. -- Bright autumn leaves drift down to the valley floor as spread-winged hawks easily glide across the crinkled Kittatinny Ridge of the Appalachians. There is serious purpose in the deceptively effortless flight of these magnificent birds, driven by primordial instinct and fortunate topography to follow this route in migrating to warmer wintering grounds. Here in these rocky outcroppings of east-central Pennsylvania, their southern journey attracts another flock of pilgrims: excited bird-watchers.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 24, 2000
Senators of both parties decided that marriage conveys sufficient penalties without including taxes among them. Cong Ehrlich looked for the root cause of crime and found the appointment of Democrats as U.S. attorneys. Pity Bill. Imagine coming back jet-fatigued after foxing with Putin, to find the gang lurking for you at Camp David. Ospreys are back in Baltimore Harbor. Some birds of prey never left.
NEWS
By William Amelia | February 11, 1992
Colored leaves falland then revealthe shapes of winter's trees,in images surreal.Stick-figures all, stretchedagainst lowering skies,frame a leafless parklandthrough winter's eyes.By the cold streambeds,sycamores peel and grate;at the edge of the wood,bare beeches congregate.There's no leafy camouflagefor winter's birds of prey;now the hawks and elmswait for a longer day.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL BARNETT and MICHAEL BARNETT,SUN REPORTER | March 9, 2006
In 1782, the bald eagle beat out the wild turkey to become the national emblem of the United States. In a more recent victory, the 3-foot-tall bird with the 6-foot wingspan escaped the clutches of extinction and soared back down to "threatened" status in Maryland, an improving classification due to proper management by places such as Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. And to celebrate the existence of these and other birds of prey in the state, the Cambridge refuge, now in its 73rd year, is holding its sixth annual Eagle Festival, a free event that starts at 8 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | November 13, 2005
Sculptor Leonard Streckfus' astonishing aviary of pigeons, pheasants and other feathered friends at Galerie Francoise are assembled from old car parts, bowling pins and similar industrial junk in the iconoclastic spirit of Picasso's famous 1943 collage of a bicycle seat and handlebars welded together in the shape of a bull's head. The works recall the "poor art" materials of Italy's Arte Povera movement of the 1960s, as well as the mix-and-match collages of earlier Cubist, Futurist and Constructivist artists, the "combine" paintings of Robert Rauschenberg and the surreal box constructions of Joseph Cornell.
TRAVEL
By Joyce Winslow and Joyce Winslow,Special to the Sun | January 2, 2005
A vast wilderness reserve teeming with wildlife, and a nearby raptor rehabilitation facility that leaves no bird behind are fascinating destinations for families eager to teach youngsters about nature. The two natural enclaves, on the outskirts of Morristown, N.J., are remarkably uncrowded and remain something of an insider's secret. On a country road outside Morristown, great oaks and maples tower over the road lined with houses. Then the country changes at Millington into lush meadows and wetlands.
FEATURES
By Rick Porter and Rick Porter,ZAP2IT | December 2, 2002
LOS ANGELES - A different kind of hero is moving to Wednesday nights on WB. Starting in January, Angel will move from Sunday nights to 9 p.m. Wednesdays, replacing the canceled Birds of Prey. The reality show High School Reunion, from Bachelor producer Mike Fleiss, will take the 9 p.m. Sunday spot for January and February. After debuting to an audience of more than 7 million, female-superhero series Birds of Prey has steadily lost viewers since then, falling to an average of about 5 million for the season.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | October 9, 2002
The image of Ashley Scott as Huntress, all black leather and cheekbones standing atop a skyscraper looking down on New Gotham at night, is already out as one of the fall's hotter posters. So, maybe it's time for the television series from which it comes to actually debut, don't you think? That would be WB's Birds of Prey, a dark fantasy drama featuring three female crime fighters based on characters from DC Comics. The acting is wooden, and the special effects are not quite feature-film quality.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2001
HAWK MOUNTAIN, Pa. -- Bright autumn leaves drift down to the valley floor as spread-winged hawks easily glide across the crinkled Kittatinny Ridge of the Appalachians. There is serious purpose in the deceptively effortless flight of these magnificent birds, driven by primordial instinct and fortunate topography to follow this route in migrating to warmer wintering grounds. Here in these rocky outcroppings of east-central Pennsylvania, their southern journey attracts another flock of pilgrims: excited bird-watchers.
NEWS
January 8, 1993
Carroll commissioners agreed yesterday to apply for a grant to help pay for a new $10,600 cage for birds of prey at the Hashawha Environmental Center.The current cage is old and falling apart, county grants analyst Michille Hyde said.The county will apply for a $5,000 grant from the Phillips Environmental Partnership.The Hashawha Recreational Council will contribute $2,700, anthe Hashawha-Bear Branch Advisory Council will contribute $500, she said.The county will be asked to contribute $2,400, she said.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
Birds -- Artist Ernie Muehlmatt is showing his life-size and miniature wooden sculptures of birds (one of which is shown above) at Patuxent Research Refuge's John Hollingsworth Art Gallery in the National Wildlife Visitor Center until early next month. During a 25-year career, he has made more than 6,000 carvings of songbirds, wildfowl and birds of prey. Showing with him is sculptor and painter John Neal Mullican, a featured sculptor/carver at the Chesapeake Wildlife Art Expo, Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and other venues.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2001
FEEDING TIME AT Piney Run Park Nature Center is a busy time for naturalist Elaine Sweitzer. She prepares meals for snakes, birds of prey, toads, frogs, snapping turtles, honeybees and fish. All these species are kept in various habitats around the nature center. Sweitzer enjoys feeding the animals, but has to prepare some very unusual meals. Some of the snakes eat mice (stored frozen and thawed for meal time). The toads and frogs like live crickets. The garter snakes like live goldfish to prey upon.
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