Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBirdland
IN THE NEWS

Birdland

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 30, 2011
A sad, sad day in Birdland upon learning of the death of Mike Flanagan. Another link to the lost Oriole Way has left us all too soon. Mr. Flanagan was everything we Orioles fans loved about our Birds in those wonderful years of "Oriole Magic. " Tough, gritty, determined and a gamer. Rest in peace, Flanny. Allen Baker, Baltimore
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 2011
A sad, sad day in Birdland upon learning of the death of Mike Flanagan. Another link to the lost Oriole Way has left us all too soon. Mr. Flanagan was everything we Orioles fans loved about our Birds in those wonderful years of "Oriole Magic. " Tough, gritty, determined and a gamer. Rest in peace, Flanny. Allen Baker, Baltimore
Advertisement
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 5, 1994
"Birdland," ABC's new one-hour drama starring Brian Dennehy, is a celebration of the dysfunctional, the semi-functional, the unhappily functioning and the just-plain screwed-up. It's "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" sanitized and sweetened for prime-time.If you love seeing exhibitions of things that don't work, tune in the premiere at 10 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13).Dennehy plays the chief of a psychiatric unit in an Oakland hospital. He treats the dysfunctional for a living.Tonight's case involves a boy who can't sleep and who recently put his arm through his bedroom window.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Simon Habtemariam and Special to b | April 7, 2011
It’s opening day in Baltimore and Camden Yards is rocking.  Buck Showalter’s revamped club has just dispatched with the Detroit Tigers, and a boisterous crowd of more than 40,000 empties out into the greater downtown area. In the center of this mayhem, a reporter is nose deep in her iPhone while on commercial break during a local radio broadcast. The watering hole she sits in is filled beyond capacity and she tries to capture this image in 140 characters or fewer for her thousands of followers.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | January 5, 1994
"Grammy's Greatest Moments" (8-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) offers a little revisionist and manipulative history, because Grammy's "hits" are no more famous than its misses. The Beatles are shown in a performance clip singing "Hey Jude," for example, but that classic song from Apple Records didn't win a Grammy for song of the year in 1968. It was nominated -- but lost to "Little Green Apples." But this special is about performers and songs, not necessarily winners and losers. In that respect, it's not worthless, though it's hard to get too enthusiastic about a show built around excerpts from previous awards shows.
FEATURES
February 17, 2001
Ending blacklisting was his finest hour Screen tough guy Kirk Douglas, at the Berlin film festival to collect an award for his lifetime achievements, said ending Hollywood's anti-communist blacklist in 1960 was his proudest moment. The three-time Academy Award nominee and honorary Oscar winner is being feted with a retrospective at the Berlin festival and yesterday was to receive the event's top prize. But "the one thing in my career I'm most proud of is the breaking of the blacklist," the 84-year-old said at a news conference Thursday.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 3, 1994
You probably would not recognize John Rothman on sight. I mean, assuming you are not an old Park School classmate or next of kin, you probably would not stop, stare, point and say, "Hey, hey, hey! You're John Rothman, the actor!"John Rothman is not an immediately recognizable name throughout Baltimore -- not yet anyway. And though it has appeared on television and in motion pictures, his is not an instantly recognizable face. Brooks Robinson's face -- now that's instantly recognizable.Just the same, Baltimore should be proud to claim John Rothman as a native son, especially this week.
NEWS
By BOB BAYLUS GATHERINGS. Marina Rust. Simon & Schuster. 237 pages. $19. and BOB BAYLUS GATHERINGS. Marina Rust. Simon & Schuster. 237 pages. $19.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 7, 1993
TC THE SEVENTH BEARER.John C. Boland.Pocket Books.247 pages. $4.99 (paperback).Stockbroker Donald McCarry is on the best kind of business trip. He is in the South of France, playing mother hen to Imrie de Wohl, a young, rich, spoiled American with more money than brains. Imrie is not satisfied with merely making money from safe but boring investments; he's looking for the excitement of investing in films.Needless to say, Imrie falls in with a couple of artists more interested in a fast buck than cinema verite.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Billy Taylor is at the piano. No surprise there. The instrument is such a part of him that even when he's telling a story, his fingers move as if he's playing a phantom keyboard."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 5, 1993
Kids, the Nazis are in control. Kids, they're rounding up dissidents, annexing Czechoslovakia, goose-stepping toward Sept. 1, 1939. What can we do? I know. Let's put on a show!That's pretty much the thrust of the high-octane kitsch item "Swing Kids" from -- who else? -- the historical ignoramuses at Disney. It's about a group of teens who fight Nazism with be-bop. Guess what? They lose.Excuse me, but it doesn't take much to be anti-Nazi in 1993. Now, 50 years ago, that was a different story.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 8, 2011
During an appearance on Rob Long's radio show on FOX 1370 AM last week, Long snuck a quick Orioles question into our conversation about the Ravens' offseason. Putting me on the spot, he asked me if the Orioles would climb out of the AL East cellar this summer. I thought about it for a few seconds, let out a few "ums" -- my answer to Ray Lewis' "bottom line" -- and guaranteed that the Orioles would finish fourth. Hey, now is the time for optimism, right? You know you're in Birdland when picking the hometown team to finish in next-to-last place is considered ratcheting up the hype machine.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
News item: The Orioles came back from another big deficit Wednesday to defeat the Seattle Mariners and take the rubber game of the three-game series at Safeco Field. My take: It's a pretty weird team that would rather be down three runs in the ninth than up four runs in the third, but you know what they say. This is Birdland. News item: Baltimore has been proposed for a new IndyCar Series race starting in 2011. The Baltimore Grand Prix would mirror similar races in St. Petersburg, Fla., and Long Beach, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
Saxophonist Dave Liebman's journey of exploration through the jazz universe and beyond was launched when he was a teen-ager in Brooklyn and discovered John Coltrane at the height of his powers. "I wouldn't have this life I've had for 35 years if it wasn't for Coltrane, seeing him live," Liebman says during a phone conversation. "I still would have loved music, I'm sure. I might have played saxophone. But I certainly don't think I ever would have thought that this is something serious to get engaged in if I had not seen Coltrane in front of my eyes.
FEATURES
February 17, 2001
Ending blacklisting was his finest hour Screen tough guy Kirk Douglas, at the Berlin film festival to collect an award for his lifetime achievements, said ending Hollywood's anti-communist blacklist in 1960 was his proudest moment. The three-time Academy Award nominee and honorary Oscar winner is being feted with a retrospective at the Berlin festival and yesterday was to receive the event's top prize. But "the one thing in my career I'm most proud of is the breaking of the blacklist," the 84-year-old said at a news conference Thursday.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2000
Nationally renowned ornithologists Don and Lillian Stokes had just finished regaling a crowd of Marylanders about the beauty and wonder of the Baltimore oriole, when a spectator's voice thundered out with a sentiment many have been feeling. "Bring us some Orioles who can pitch," barked Morton Fisher, a Rockland resident and bird-watcher who went to the Baltimore Zoo yesterday for the Stokeses' chat about Maryland's favorite bird. Fisher is as much a Baltimore baseball fan as he is a Baltimore bird fan -- as painful as that is now amid the Orioles' slump.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1998
Halsey the parrot flew the coop to visit a flock of friends Sunday a few blocks away -- the Orioles.The bright green nanday condor parrot with a black face escaped Saturday night through the open french doors of Natasha Parks' home on Jasper Street, about five blocks north of Camden Yards.The heartbroken Parks thought she had seen the last of her feathered friend, which she's had for four years. But when Parks and her mother went to the exhibition game Sunday between the Orioles and New York Mets, she thought she heard the distinctive piercing screech of her pal, Halsey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
Saxophonist Dave Liebman's journey of exploration through the jazz universe and beyond was launched when he was a teen-ager in Brooklyn and discovered John Coltrane at the height of his powers. "I wouldn't have this life I've had for 35 years if it wasn't for Coltrane, seeing him live," Liebman says during a phone conversation. "I still would have loved music, I'm sure. I might have played saxophone. But I certainly don't think I ever would have thought that this is something serious to get engaged in if I had not seen Coltrane in front of my eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Simon Habtemariam and Special to b | April 7, 2011
It’s opening day in Baltimore and Camden Yards is rocking.  Buck Showalter’s revamped club has just dispatched with the Detroit Tigers, and a boisterous crowd of more than 40,000 empties out into the greater downtown area. In the center of this mayhem, a reporter is nose deep in her iPhone while on commercial break during a local radio broadcast. The watering hole she sits in is filled beyond capacity and she tries to capture this image in 140 characters or fewer for her thousands of followers.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Billy Taylor is at the piano. No surprise there. The instrument is such a part of him that even when he's telling a story, his fingers move as if he's playing a phantom keyboard."
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
It doesn't seem possible, but Ford is killing the Thunderbird.The car the Beach Boys sang about, the car Suzanne Somers drove in "American Graffiti," the car whose name evoked images of Pax Americana, is going the way of the AMC Gremlin. The last one rolls off the Lorain, Ohio, assembly line in late August.Its death is big news on the culture front: Generational Touchstone Dies; Victim of the Bottom Line. But in T-Bird Land, where the true believers live, there is barely a shrug of the shoulder.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.